Vickers E.F.B.1

Vickers E.B.1 - 1913
Vickers E.B.1 - 1913

Vickers received a contract from the Admiralty on November 19, 1912 for an experimental fighting biplane armed with a machine gun. Vickers investigated various configurations before deciding on placing the gunner in the extreme nose of the aircraft, in order to achieve a clear field of fire and avoid the still unsolved problem of firing a machiegun through the propeller's arc. Designated E.F.B. or Experimental Fighting Biplane 1 the aircraft was also known as the "Destroyer". Even though the prototype was unsuccessful; the Vickers E.F.B.1 was, if not the first, then one of the earliest dedicated fighter aircraft ever built.
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Vickers E.F.B.1
  • Type: Experimental Fighter
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Ltd (Aviation Department)
  • First Flight: Early 1913
  • Number Built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: Wolseley V-eight-cylinder engine 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: 40 ft 0 in (12.19 m)
  • Wing Area: 385.02ft² (35.77 m²)
  • Length: 28 ft 6 in (8.38 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 11 in (3.63 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1759 lb (798 kg)
  • Take-off Weight: 2661 lb (1207 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 70 mph (113 km/h)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 1× forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7mm) Maxim machine gun

Vickers E.F.B.2

Vickers E.B.2 - 1913
Vickers E.B.2 - 1913

Following the loss of the E.F.B.1, Vickers undertook major redesign of its gun carrier while retaining the basic configuration to result in the E.F.B.2, again against an Admiralty contract. The E.F.B.2 eliminated the wing stagger of the previous aircraft and increased the span of the lower wing while retaining warping for lateral control. The fuselage nacelle was redesigned and large celluloid windows were inserted in its sides; the angular horizontal tail surfaces gave place to surfaces of elliptical form and a 100hp Gnome Monosoupape nine-cylinder rotary engine was fitted. The 7.7mm machine gun on a ball-and-socket mounting in the forward cockpit was retained, and the E.F.B.2 entered flight test at Bognor in the autumn of 1913, but crashed there during the course of October.

Vickers E.F.B.2
  • Type: Experimental Fighter
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Ltd (Aviation Department)
  • First Flight: Autumn 1913
  • Number Built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1× Gnome Monosoupape air cooled 9-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 39 ft 7 in (11.76 m)
  • Wing area: 379.97 sq ft (35.30 m2)
  • Length: 29 ft 2 in (8.89 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 7 in (2.92 m)
  • Take-off Weight: 1759 lb (798 kg)
  • Empty Weight: 1049 lb (476 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 60 mph (97 km/h)
  • Range: 150 miles (241 km)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 1× forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7mm) Maxim machine gun

Vickers E.F.B.3

Vickers E.B.3 - 1913
Vickers E.B.3 - 1913

In December 1913, a third Vickers Experimental Fighting Biplane, the E.F.B.3, made its debut. The slight overhang of the top wing was eliminated to result in an equi-span biplane, the fuselage nacelle underwent further redesign, the celluloid windows being eliminated, and, most important, ailerons on both upper and lower wings supplanted the wing-warping control of its predecessors. The 100hp Gnome Monosoupape rotary was retained as was also the 7.7mm Vickers gun. Displayed at the Aero Show held at Olympia in 1914, the E.F.B.3. was the subject of an order from the Admiralty for six aircraft placed in December 1913. This contract was subsequently taken over by the War Office, the six aircraft embodying a number of modifications - at least one was fitted with an eight-cylinder Vee-type 80hp Wolseley engine - and being referred to as the Vickers No (or Type) 30. These were to lead in turn to the E.F.B.5 and F.B.5 Gunbus.

Vickers E.F.B.3
  • Type: Experimental Fighter
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Ltd (Aviation Department)
  • First Flight: December 1913
  • Number Built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1× Gnome Monosoupape air cooled 9-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 4 in (11.38 m)
  • Wing area: 385.02 sq ft (35.77 m2)
  • Length: 28 ft 6 in (8.38 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 9 in (2.97 m)
  • Take-off weight: 1680 lb (762 kg)
  • Empty weight: 1049 l (476 kg)b
  • Max. speed: 60 mph (97 km/h)
  • Range: 300 miles (483 km)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 1× forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7mm) Maxim machine gun

Vickers E.F.B.7

Vickers E.B.7 - 1914
Vickers E.B.7 - 1914

The Vickers E.F.B.7 was a prototype British fighter aircraft of the First World War. A twin-engined biplane, the E.F.B.7 was unsuccessful, only a single example being built.

In August 1914, following the outbreak of the First World War, the British pioneer aircraft designer Howard Flanders was hired by Vickers Limited as an aircraft designer, with his first job to design a fighting aircraft to carry a Vickers 1 pounder (37 mm) cannon. (This was not the well-known pom-pom, but a smaller and lighter long recoil cannon firing less powerful ammunition.) Flanders produced a twin engined development of his earlier Flanders B.2 single-engined biplane, the E.F.B.7 (Experimental Fighting Biplane No.7).
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Vickers E.F.B.7
  • Role: Fighter aircraft
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed By: Howard Flanders
  • First Flight: August 1915
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: 1
  • Developed From: Flanders B.2
  • Powerplant: 2 × Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 59 ft 6 in (18.14 m)
  • Wing Area: 640 ft² (59.5 m²)
  • Length: 36 ft 0 in (10.98 m)
  • Empty Weight: 2,136 lb (971 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 3,196 lb (1,453 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 75 mph (121 km/h)
  • Endurance: 2½ hours
  • Service Ceiling: 9,000 ft (2,700 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 278 ft/min (1.4 m/s)
  • Crew: Two
  • Armament: 1× Vickers 1-lbr gun

References

  1. Vickers E.F.B.7 Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_E.F.B.7
  2. Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, E.B. Vickers Aircraft since 1908. London:Putnam, Second edition, 1988, p.104. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Bruce, J.M. War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three, Fighters. London:Macdonald, 1969, pp. 81-85. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  4. Mason, Francis K. The British Fighter since 1912. Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992, p.43. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  5. Williams, Anthony G. and Gustin, Emmanuel. Flying Guns: World War I and its Aftermath 1914-32 pp. 86-88. Ramsbury, UK:Airlife, 2003. ISBN 1 84037 396 2.

Vickers E.F.B.8

Vickers E.B.8 - 1915
Vickers E.F.B.8

The Vickers E.F.B.8 was a prototype British twin-engined fighter of the First World War. It was abandoned after only one aircraft was built, single engined fighters being considered to have superior manoeuvrability.

In autumn 1915, as well as the big, cannon armed, Vickers E.F.B.7, Vickers were working on the design of a second twin-engined fighter, the E.F.B.8 (Experimental Fighting Biplane No. 8). This design, which was assigned to Rex Pierson was for a smaller, machine gun armed fighter. With twice the power of Vickers' single-engined pusher Vickers F.B.5 Gunbus, which, while possessing an effective armament, was far too slow, the E.F.B.8 was hoped to have adequate performance. Like the E.F.B.7, the E.F.B.8 was a two-bay biplane with a steel-tube structure with plywood and fabic covering, and powered by two tractor Gnome Monosoupape rotary engines mounted between the wings. It was however, much more compact, with a wingspan 20 ft less and 500 lb (230 kg) lighter. The gunner, armed with a single Lewis gun was sat in the nose, while the pilot again like the E.F.B.7. sat under the trailing edge of the wings, remote from the gunner and hindering co-operation between them in battle.
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Vickers E.F.B.8
  • Type: Fighter aircraft
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed By: Rex Pierson
  • First Flight: November 1915
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 2× Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 38 ft 4 in (11.69 m)
  • Wing Area: 468 ft² (43.5 m²)
  • Length: 28 ft 2 in (8.59 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 10 in (3.00 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,840 lb (836 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,610 lb (1,186 kg)
  • Maximum Take-off Weight: 2701 lb (1225 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 98 mph (85 knots, 157 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,520 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 14,000 ft (4,300 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Climb to: 5,000 ft (1,520 m) 10 min
  • Crew: Two
  • Armament: 1× .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun in nose

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers E.F.B.8, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_E.F.B.8"
  2. Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, E.B. Vickers Aircraft since 1908. London:Putnam, Second edition, 1988. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18. London:Putnam, 1957.
  4. Bruce, J.M." War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three, Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1969. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  5. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters. New York, Smithmark, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  6. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Vickers E.S.1

Vickers E.S.1
Vickers E.S.1

The Vickers E.S.1 was an early British Fighter aircraft of the First World War. A single engined biplane, only three E.S.1s were built, although at least one was used by a home defence squadron of the Royal Flying Corps.

In late 1914, Harold Barnwell, chief test pilot with Vickers Limited, designed a single seat "scout" or fast reconnaissance aircraft, and had it built without the knowledge or approval of his employers, "borrowing" a Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine from Vickers' stores to power the aircraft. Barnwell attempted a first flight of his design, named the "Barnwell Bullet" in early 1915, but the aircraft crashed and was wrecked, possibly due to a miscalculated Center of gravity. Now aware of Barnwell's design, Vickers instructed their junior designer Rex Pierson to redesign the Bullet.

The redesigned aircraft, the Vickers E.S.1 (Experimental Scout), was a single-engined tractor biplane of fabric covered wooden construction. It had single-bay unstaggered wings with ailerons on both the upper and lower wings. Like the Barnwell Bullet, the E.S.1 was powered by a Monosoupape engine, closely cowled into a circular section fuselage. The pilot's cockpit was situated under the trailing edge of the upper wing, from which the view both downwards and upwards was poor.
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E.S.1 Mk II, Clerget engine
  • Type: Fighter aircraft
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed By: Rex Pierson
  • First Flight: August 1915
  • Operational Trials: 1916
  • Status: Prototype
  • Primary User: Royal Flying Corps
  • Number Built: 3
  • Powerplant: 1× Clerget 9-cylinder rotary engine, 110 hp (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 24 ft 5.5 in (7.46 m)
  • Wing Area: 215ft² (20.0 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 3 in (6.17 m)
  • Height: 8 ft (2.44 m)
  • Empty Weight: 981 lb (446 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,502 lb (683 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 112 mph (97 knots, 180 km/h) at sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 15,500 ft (4,730 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 1,000 ft/min (5.1 m/s)
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft (3,050 m) 18 min
  • Endurance: 2 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1× synchronised forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers E.S.1, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_E.S.1"
  2. Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, E.B. "Vickers Aircraft since 1908". London:Putnam, Second edition, 1988, p.60, p.74. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three, Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1969, pp. 86-89, p.91. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  4. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York, Smithmark, 1994, p. 576. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  5. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992, pp. 43-44. ISBN

Vickers F.B.5 Gun Bus

Vickers F.B.5 Gun Bus
Vickers Fighting Biplane 5 Gun Bus

The Vickers F.B.5 (Fighting Biplane 5) was the first aircraft specifically designed for air-to-air combat to see service as a fighter for the Royal Flying Corps, making it the world's first operational fighter aircraft.. With its engine mounted behind the cockpit, it the first pusher to enter service during World War I. Commonly referred to as the "Gunbus," it was armed with a moveable, forward firing 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun operated by the observer in the front of the nacelle. Vulnerable to attack from the rear, the Gunbus was soon replaced by more advanced single-seat fighter aircraft. Lionel Rees scored more victories with this aircraft than any other ace. In 1915, he and his gunner downed six enemy planes while flying the F.B.5.
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Vickers F.B.5 Gun Bus
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Ltd (Aviation Department)
  • Entered Service: February 5, 1915
  • Number Built: 224
  • Powerplant: 1× Gnome Monosoupape air cooled 9-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wing Span: 36 ft 6 in (11.13 m)
  • Length: 27 ft 2 in (8.28 m)
  • Height: 11 ft (3.35 m)
  • Wing Area: 382 ft² (35.5 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 1,220 lb (555 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,050 lb (930 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 70 mph (61 knots, 113 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,520 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 9,000 ft (2,743 m)
  • Climb: to 5,000 ft (1,520 m): 16 min
  • Wing Loading: 5.4 lb/ft² (26 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 0.05 hp/lb (0.08 kW/kg)
  • Range: 250 mi (403 km)
  • Endurance: 4 hours 30 minutes
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 1 or 2 × trainable 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis guns in observer's cockpit

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers F.B.5, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.5"
  2. Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, "E.B. Vickers Aircraft since 1908". London:Putnam, 1988. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "Vickers' First Fighters". Air Enthusiast No 12, April -July 1980. pp.54-70. ISSN 0143-5450.
  4. Gutmann, Jon and Dempsey, Harry. "Pusher Aces of World War 1". Osprey Pub Co, 2009. ISBN 1846034175, 9781846034176.

Vickers F.B.11

Vickers F.B.11
Vickers F.B.11

The Vickers F.B.11 was a prototype British three-seat escort fighter of the First World War. A large single engined biplane, it carried one gunner in a nacelle mounted on the upper wing to give an all-round field of fire. Only a single example was completed.

In early 1916, the British War Office drew up a specification for a multi-seat escort fighter to be powered by one of the new Rolls-Royce Eagle engines, intended to protect formations of bombers from German fighters such as the Fokker E.I, with an additional role of destroying enemy airships. While the specification did not require high speed, a good field of fire for its guns was essential, while the secondary anti-Zeppelin role demanded an endurance of at least seven hours.
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Vickers F.B.11
  • Type: Escort fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed By: R.L Howard-Flanders
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1× Rolls-Royce Eagle III water-cooled V-12, 250 hp (187 kW)
  • Wingspan: 51 ft 0 in (15.55 m)
  • Wing Area: 845 ft² (78.5 m²)
  • Length: 43 ft 0 in (13.11 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 8 in (4.17 m)
  • Empty Weight: 3,340 lb (1,518 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 4,934 lb (2,243 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 96 mph (83 knots, 155 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,520 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 11,000 ft (3,350 m)
  • Endurance: 7.5 hours
  • Climb to: 5,000 ft (1,520 m) 16 min 30 s
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft (3,050 m) 55 min
  • Crew: 3 (pilot and two gunners)
  • Armament: 1× .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun in nacelle, 1× Lewis gun in rear gunners cockpit

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers F.B.11, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.11"
  2. Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, E.B. "Vickers Aircraft since 1908". London:Putnam, 1988, p.69. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957, p.25, p.572.
  4. Bruce, J.M. War "Planes of the First World War: Volume Three Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1969, p.100. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  5. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York:Smithmark, 1994, p.577-578. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  6. Lewis, Peter. "The British Fighter since 1912". London:Putnam, Fourth edition, 1979, p.99. ISBN 0 370 10049 2.
  7. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992, p.67. ISBN 1-55750-082-7

Vickers F.B.12

Vickers F.B.12
Vickers F.B.12

The slow, low flying and fragile Vickers F.B.12 marks the last gasp for British pusher-type fightercraft development. The introduction of the Sopwith Pup, and Triplane, which were both far superior aircraft in terms of handling characteristics, maximum speed, and operational celings killed chances for the F.B.12 before it could enter into production.

At the start of the First World War, Vickers entered into a partnership with the Hart Engine Company to develop a 150 hp (110 kW) nine-cyliner radial engine designed by Hart. This engine was planned to power a number of new designs by Vickers, the first of which was a small single-engine pusher biplane fighter, the F.B.12.
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Vickers F.B.12
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • First Flight: July 1916
  • Number Built: 22
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome Monosoupape nine-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft in (7.93 m)
  • Wing area: 204 ft² (19.0 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 6 in (6.55 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 8 in (2.64 m)
  • Empty weight: 845 lb (384 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,275 lb (580 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 86 mph (138 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Service ceiling: 11,500 ft (3,500 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 - 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers F.B.12, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.12"
  2. Bruce, J.M. (1969)." War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three Fighters". london: Macdonald. ISBN 356 01490 8. .
  3. Lamberton, W.M. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Herts: Harleyford Publications Ltd..
.

Vickers F.B.14

Vickers F.B.12
Vickers F.B.14

The Vickers F.B.14 was a British two-seat fighter/reconnaissance biplane designed and built by Vickers Limited. About 100 were built for the Royal Flying Corps but saw only limited use as it was designed for a larger engine which was not available when production commenced and it did not meet performance expectations.

The F.B.14 was a conventional single-bay biplane with two tandem open cockpits and a fixed tailskid landing gear. It was designed to use a new engine, the 230 hp (170 kW) BHP inline engine (later to become the Siddeley Puma). The steel-tube airframe was completed in mid-1916, but the engine was not ready and it was fitted with a 160 hp (120 kW) Beardmore engine instead. The aircraft was underpowered with the Beardmore engine and suffered reliability problems and over 50 production aircraft were delivered to the Royal Flying Corps without engines. A more reliable engine was tested, but the 120 hp (90 kW) Beardmore did not help meet the performance required. Attempts to fit alternate engines resulted in a number of variants with the most successful being a Rolls-Royce Eagle IV Vee engine. The aircraft performance was inferior to the contempary Bristol F.2B, however, and further development of the F.B.14 was abandoned.
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Vickers F.B.14
  • Role: Fighter, reconnaissance biplane
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers
  • First flight: 1916
  • Primary user: Royal Flying Corps
  • Number built: 100+
  • Powerplant: 1 × Beardmore engine, 160 hp (119 kW)
  • Wingspan: 39 ft 6 in (12.04 m)
  • Wing area: 427 ft² (39.7 m²)
  • Length: 28 ft 5 in (8.66 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 0 in (3.05 m)
  • Empty weight: 1662 lb (755 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2603 lb (1183 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 99.5 mph ( km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours 45 min
  • Service ceiling: 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • 1 × forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun
    • 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun fitted on a Scarff ring in rear cockpit

References

  1. Vickers F.B.14. (2010, September 16). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:37, December 29, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Vickers_F.B.14&oldid=385148999
  2. Andrews, C.F.; Morgan, E.B. (1988). Vickers Aircraft since 1908 (Second ed.), p.71-72, p.75. London: Putnam. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions.
  4. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.

Vickers F.B.16

Vickers F.B.16
Vickers F.B.16

The F.B.16 was a single-bay staggered biplane with an elliptical cross section, designed by Rex K Pierson, to utilise the 150 hp Hart engine. The initial F.B.16 was completed and flown in the summer of 1916. The fuselage was fully faired out, and the Hart engine was partly cowled. Armament consisting of a single centrally-mounted synchronised 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun. During the course of testing, the part-cowling was removed from the engine to improve cooling. The decking aft of the cockpit was cut down and new vertical tail surfaces were fitted. With the suspension development of the Hart engine, the basic F.B.16 underwent a major redesign.

F.B.16A

The redesigned aircraft was designated the F.B.16A. It was powered with a 150 hp Hispano-Suiza water-cooled V-eight engine. This aircraft was destroyed in a crash on 20 December 1916, but a second identical aircraft was completed in the following month. The F.B.16A had flat fuselage sides and the single synchronised 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun was supplemented by a 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine gun mounted above the center section.
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Vickers F.B.16D
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed By: Rex K Pierson
  • First Flight: Summer of 1916
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant:
    • F.B.16: 1× Hart radial, 150 hp (110 kW)
    • F.B.16A: × Hispano-Suiza V-8 cylinder water-cooled engine, 150 hp (110 kW)
    • F.B.16D:1× Hispano-Suiza V-8 cylinder water-cooled engine, 200 hp (149 kW)
    • F.B.16E: Lorraine-Dietrich 8Bd V-8 cylinder water-cooled engine, 275 hp (205 kW)
  • Wingspan: 25 ft 0 in (7.62 m)
  • Wing Area: 206.99 ft² (19.23 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 6 in (5.94 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 9 in (2.67 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1376 lb (624 kg)
  • Take-off Weight: 1874 lb (850 kg)
  • Maximum Speed:
    • F.B.16D: 135 mph (217 km/h)
    • F.B.16E: (220km/h at 3050m)
  • Service Ceiling: 18500 ft (5640 m)
  • Climb To: (3050 m - 7.85 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • F.B.16A: 1 × forward firing, synchronised 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns, 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis
    • F.B.16D: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis firing through the hollow propeller shaft.
    • F.B.16E: 2 × forward firing, synchronised 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns

References

  1. Virtual Aircraft Museum Vickers F.B.16 http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/vickers_fb-16.php
  2. The Aerodrome Forum, F.B.16D: http://www.theaerodrome.com/forum/aircraft/14680-vickers-f-b-16d.html
  3. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three, Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1969. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  4. Bruce, J.M. "Fighters W.W.1" VOL. III
  5. Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, E.B. "Vickers Aircraft since 1908". London:Putnam, Second edition, 1988. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.

Vickers F.B.19

Vickers F.B.19
Vickers F.B.19

The Vickers F.B.19 was an aircraft with several design flaws that prevented it from becoming popular, or widely used aircraft. It was relatively slow, underpowered, and not at all capable of reaching higher altitudes.
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Vickers F.B.19
  • Type: Fighter
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône 9J air-cooled 9 cylinder rotary, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 24 ft 0 in (7.31 m)
  • Length: 18 ft 2 in (5.54 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 3 in (2.51 m)
  • Empty Weight: 893 lb (405 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,477 lb (670 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 98 mph, 85 knots (158 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 16,995 ft (5,180 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1× 0.303 (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers_FB-19, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.19"
  2. "Virtual Aircraft Museum". avia.russian.ee. http://avia.russian.ee/air/england/vickers_fb-19.php.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes Of The First World War: Volume Three Fighters". London: Macdonald, 1969. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.

Vickers F.B.24

Vickers F.B.24 - 1917
Vickers F.B.24

The Vickers F.B.24 was a British two-seat fighter aircraft of the First World War. Only a few prototypes were built, as although it had good performance, the Bristol F.2 Fighter was preferred.

In the early years of the First World War, Vickers Limited designed a number of aircraft to use the 150 hp (112 kW) Hart radial engine, the development of which was being funded by Vickers, including two single seat fighters, the F.B.12 pusher and the tractor F.B.16. A third design planned to use the Hart was the F.B.24, a two seat fighter reconnaissance aircraft.

The Hart engine proved to be unreliable, however, and was abandoned prior to the first prototype being completed in December 1916, and it became necessary to find a new powerplant for the F.B.24, with the Hispano-Suiza 8 being chosen. The first two prototypes, the F.B.24A and F.B.24B used a 150 hp Hispano-Suiza, with the first probably flying in March 1917. but were converted to use a 200 hp (149 kW) Hispano-Suiza, becoming the F.B.24D. The F.B.24D was a two-bay biplane with a rectangular section fuselage. The pilot and observer/gunner sat close together in separate open cockpits, with the pilot directly under the upper wings. Despite transparent panels built into the upper wings, the pilots view was very poor.
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Vickers F.B.24.24C
  • Role: Two-seat fighter
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers
  • First flight: 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: Aproximately 6
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lorraine-Dietrich 8Bd water-cooled V-8 engine, 275 hp (205 kW)
  • Upper wingspan: 37 ft 6 in (11.43 m)
  • Lower wingspan: 31 ft 0 in (9.45 m)
  • Wing area: 384 ft² (35.7 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,709 lb (775 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,650 lb (1,202 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 129.5 mph (208.4 km/h; 112.5 kn) at 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Service ceiling: 23,000 ft (7,010 m) (absolute ceiling)
  • Time to altitude:
    • 11 minutes to 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
    • 18 minutes to 15,000 ft (4,670 m)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Pilot: 2 × fixed, forward firing, .303 inch (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns
    • Observer: 1 × Lewis gun on Scarff ring in rear cockpit

References

  1. Vickers F.B.24. (2010, September 16). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:31, December 29, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Vickers_F.B.24&oldid=385149748
  2. Vickers F.B.24 1916 Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 07:32, December 29, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/vickers_fb-24.php
  3. Andrews, C.F. and E.B. Morgan. Vickers Aircraft since 1908. London:Putnam, 1988, pp. 63, 66, pp. 72-73. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  4. Bruce, J.M. British Aeroplanes 1914-18. London:Putnam, 1957, pp. 691-692.
  5. Bruce, J. M. War Planes of the First World War:Volume Three Fighters. London:Macdonald, 1969, pp. 118-120, pp. 122-123. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  6. Mason, Francis K. The British Fighter since 1912. Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992, p. 101. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  7. ""Milestones":The Vickers Machines". Flight, 12 June 1919. pp. 760-769.

Vickers F.B.26 Vampire I

F.B.26 Vampire I
F.B.26 Vampire I

The Vickers F.B.26 Vampire was a British single-seat biplane pusher fighter built by Vickers during the First World War. Four were built by Vickers at Bexleyheath, one of these was subsequently modified to become the F.B.26A.

The design was a development of the earlier Vickers F.B.12 prototypes; it was a single-bay biplane with a nacelle for the pilot and armament of two .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns. Behind this was a water-cooled 200 hp (150 kW) Hispano-Suiza engine driving the propeller. The tailplane was a boom-mounted single rudder.

From an initial two Lewis guns, the planned effectiveness of the armament was increased; firstly by adding flexibility in elevation, then by addition of an extra gun. With three guns capable of firing up at a 45° angle, the FB.26 was thought able to engage enemy bombers from below.
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F.B.26 Vampire I
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers
  • First Flight: May 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: 4
  • Developed From: Vickers F.B.12
  • Powerplant: 1× Hispano-Suiza 8 water cooled V-8, 200 hp (149 kW)
  • Wingspan: 31 ft 6 in (9.60 m)
  • Wing Area: 267 ft² (24.8 m²)
  • Length: 23 ft 5 in (7.14 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 5 in (2.87 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,467 lb (667 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,030 lb (923 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 105 kn (121 mph, 195 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,500 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 20,500 ft (6,250 m)
  • Wing Loading: 7.60 lb/ft² (37.2 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 0.099 hp/lb (0.16 kW/kg)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft (3,050 m) 10 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers Vampire, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_Vampire"
  2. Andrews, C.F and Morgan, E.B. "Vickers Aircraft since 1908". London:Putnam, Second edition 1988. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1969. ISBN 356 01490 8.
  4. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York: Smithmark, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  5. Lamberton, W.M. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Herts, UK:Harleyford Publications, 1960.

Vickers Vimy

 Vickers Vimy
Vickers Vimy

The Vickers Vimy was a British heavy bomber aircraft of the First World War and post-First World War era. By October 1918, only three aircraft had been delivered to the Royal Air Force, one of which had been deployed to France for use by the Independent Air Force. The war ended, however, before it could be used on operations.

Reginald Kirshaw "Rex" Pierson, chief designer of Vickers Limited Aviation Department designed a twin-engine biplane bomber, the Vickers F.B.27 to meet a requirement for a night bomber capable of attacking targets in Germany, a contract being placed for three prototypes on August 14, 1917. Design and production of the prototypes was extremely rapid, with the first flying on November 30, 1917, powered by two 200 hp (150 kW) Hispano Suiza engines. It was named after the Battle of Vimy Ridge.
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Vickers Vimy
  • Type: Heavy bomber
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed by: Reginald Kirshaw Pierson
  • First flight: 30 November 1917
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Retired: 1933
  • Primary User: Royal Air Force
  • Variants: Vickers Vernon
  • Powerplant: 2 × Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII piston engines, 360 hp (268 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 68 ft 1 in (20.75 m)
  • Wing Area: 1,330 ft² (123.56 m²)
  • Length: 43 ft 7 in (13.28 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 8 in (4.77 m)
  • Empty Weight: 7,104 lb (3,222 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 10,884 lb (4,937 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 100 mph (161 km/h)
  • Range: 900 mi (1,448 km)
  • Service ceiling: 7,000 ft (2,134 m)
  • Power/mass: 0.07 hp/lb (0.11 kW/kg)
  • Crew: 4
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun in Scarff ring in nose and 1 × in Scarff ring in mid-fuselage
    • Bombs: 2,476 lb (1,123 kg) of bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia, Vickers Vimy, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_Vimy"
  2. Andrews, C.F. and Eric B. Morgan. Vickers Aircraft since 1908, Second edition. London: Putnam, 1988. ISBN 0-85177-815-1.
  3. Jackson, A.J. British Civil Aircraft 1919-1972: Volume III. London: Putnam, revised second edition, 1988. ISBN 0-85177-818-6.
  4. Jarrett, Philip. "By Day and By Night: Part Six." Aeroplane Monthly Volume 20, No. 11, November 1992. London: IPC. pp. 8-14.
  5. Mason, Francis K. The British Bomber Since 1914. London: Putnam Aeronautical Books, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.
  6. McMillan, Peter. "The Vimy Flies Again" National Geographic Volume 187, No. 5, May 1995. Washington. pp. 4-43.
  7. Thetford, Owen. "By Day and By Night: Part Seven." Aeroplane Monthly Volume 20, No. 12, December 1992. London: IPC. pp. 30-38.
  8. Winchester, Jim, ed. "Vickers Vimy." Biplanes, Triplanes and Seaplanes (Aviation Factfile). London: Grange Books plc, 2004. ISBN 1-84013-641-3.