Anatra-DSS

Anatra-DSS
Anatra-DSS

The Anatra D, DS, and DSS were almost identical. Most of the differences between the aircraft were in the powerplant. Radiators were installed on the sides of the Plywood covered fuselage or under the nose section. In February 1917 a few of the Anatra DSS with more powerful engine and some design changes were built. This variant was slightly faster than the previously produced model.

Anatra-DSS
  • Type: reconnaissance
  • Manufacturer: Anatra Factories
  • First Flight:1917
  • Entered Service: 1917
  • Primary User: Imperial Russian Air Service
  • Engines: 1 × Salmson Canton-Unne water cooled radial 160 hp (119 kW)
  • Wingspan: (11.4 m)
  • Length: (95m)
  • Empty Weight: (808kg)
  • Loaded weight: (1164kg)
  • Speed: (153km/h
  • Service Ceiling: (4400m
  • Endurance: 3.0h
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 2 × machineguns

References

  1. "The Imperial Russian Air Service" Flying Machine Press, pp.338-344, p 488-491
  2. "Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One" Flying Machine Press, p. 454
  3. Windsock Volume 2, No. 4, Winter, 1986, p. 19-21.

Anadwa Salmson

Anadwa VKh - 1916
Anadwa Salmson

After test flights in 1916, the Anatra VKh was rebuilt using fuselages from the Anasal. It was powered by the more powerful by 140 hp Salmson engines. It was concluded that aircraft could be used as a light bomber. Fifty were ordered to compensate supply shortages of the Ilya Mouromets”. The order was signed November 3, 1917, but it was never completely filled.

Anadwa Salmson
  • Type: light bomber
  • National Origin: Russia
  • First Flight:1917
  • Entered Service: 1917
  • Primary User: Imperial Russian Air Service
  • Engines: 2 × Salmson B.9, water-cooled 9 cylinder, radial 140 hp (104 kW)
  • Length: (8.1m)
  • Wingspan: (19.1m)
  • Empty Weight: (1280kg)
  • Loaded weight: (1300kg)
  • Maximum Speed: (140km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: (4000m)
  • Endurance: 3.0h
  • Payload: (650kg)
  • Crew: 3-6

Nieuport 17

Nieuport 17
Nieuport 17

Many of the French and British aces began their careers flying the Nieuport 17. The highly maneuverable "Superbébé" was a larger, improved version of the Nieuport 11. Like its predecessor, it was initially equipped with a Lewis gun but was upgraded to a synchronized Vickers machine gun. Helping end Germany's domination of the air war, the Nieuport 17 easily outclimbed and outperformed the Fokker E.III. The superior design was so successful that German high command ordered it copied.

Nieuport 17
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Société Anonyme des Establissements Nieuport
  • First Introduced: March 1916
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône 9J, 9 cylinder air cooled radial, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wing Span: 26 ft 11 in 8.22 m
  • Length: 18 ft 10 in 5.74 m
  • Height: 7 ft 10 in
  • Empty Weight: 827 lb
  • Loaded Weight: 1246 lb 565 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 110 mph 177 kmh
  • Service Ceiling: 17,388 ft 5,300 m
  • Endurance: 2 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun and/or 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Nieuport 17, "From Wikipedia Nieuport 17"
  2. Bruce, Jack. "Those Classic Nieuports". Air Enthusiast Quarterly. Number Two, 1976. Bromley, UK:Pilot Press. pp. 137-153.
  3. Cheesman E.F., ed. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918" War. Letchworth, UK: Harleyford Publications, 1960.
  4. Cooksley, Peter. "Nieuport Fighters in Action". Carrollton, Texas: Squadron/Signal Publications, 1997. ISBN 0-89747-377-9.
Nieuport 17 - DUK - 1917

Sikorsky S-20

Sikorsky S-20
Sikorsky S-20

The Sikorsky S-20 (named after its designer) or RBVZ S-XX (named after its manufacturer) was a Russian single-bay un-equal span two-seat biplane designed by Igor Sikorsky in 1916. Displaying some Nieuport influence, it saw very little service during World War I. Five S-XX aircraft were built in September 1916, with the first two powered by the 100 hp Gnome rotary engine which had powered its predecessor, the RBVZ S-XVI. However, the other three were powered with the 120 hp Le Rhðne engine, with which they were allegedly faster than the French Nieuport 17.

The S-XX saw little service due to it being viewed as inferior to newer enemy aircraft and no series production was undertaken. As such only 5 aircraft were ever produced.

Sikorsky S-20 (RBVZ S-XX)
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: RBVZ (Russo-Baltic Wagon Works)
  • Designed by: Igor Sikorsky
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Introduced: 1916
  • Retired: 1920
  • Primary User: Imperial Russian Air Service
  • Number Built: 5
  • Powerplant: 1× Le Rhône air-cooled rotary engine, 120 hp (90 kW)
  • Wingspan: 28 ft 2.5 in (8.60m)
  • Wing Area: 182.99 ft² (17m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 0.8753 in (6.50m)
  • Empty Weight: 871 lb (395 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,257 lb (570 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 118 mph (190 km/h)
  • Climb to: 6,560 ft (2,000 m) 6.33 minutes
  • Crew: Two
  • Armament: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lavrov machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Sikorsky S-20, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sikorsky_S-20"
  2. Green, William and Gordon Swanborough. "The Complete Book of Fighters". Colour Library Direct, Godalming, UK: 1994. ISBN 1-85833-777-1.

SPAD S VII

SPAD VII - 1917
SPAD S VII

The French Air Service replaced the Nieuport 17 with the SPAD S.VII. Although disadvantaged by poor forward and downward visibility from the cockpit, the SPAD S.VII was fast, durable and difficult to shoot down. It was a good performer, flown by nearly all the French aces. However it proved to be less successful in the hands of British, possibly due to the combat tactics employed by the pilots of the Royal Flying Corps. With 18 victories, Irish ace William Cochran-Patrick scored more victories with the SPAD S.VII and SPAD S.XIII than any other ace.

SPAD S VII
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Société Pour L'Aviation et ses Dérivés
  • Designed By: Louis Béchereau
  • First Introduced: September 1916
  • Number Built: 3,825
  • Powerplant: Hispano-Suiza 8A, Water cooled V-8, 150 hp (110 kW)
  • Wing Span: 25 ft 7.75 in 7.82 m
  • Length: 20 ft 2 in 6.15 m
  • Height: 7 ft 6.5 in
  • Empty Weight: 1,102 lb
  • Loaded Weight: 1632 lb 740 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 119 mph 191.5 kmh
  • Service Ceiling: 17,500 ft
  • Endurance: 1.5 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × or 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia SPAD S.VII, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPAD_S.VII"
  2. Bordes, Gerard. "SPAD." Mach 1, L'encyclopédie de l'Aviation, Volume 8. Paris: Atlas, 1981, pp. 2173-2187.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The First Fighting SPADs". Air Enthusiast, Issue 26, April - July 1981. Bromley, Kent: Pilot Press, p. 59, p. 61-62. ISSN 0143-5450.
  4. Connors, John F., Don Greer and Perry Manley. "SPAD Fighters in Action" (Aircraft in Action No. 93). Carrollton, Texas: Squadron-Signal Publications, 1989. ISBN 0-89747-217-9.
  5. Crosby, Francis. "A Handbook of Fighter Aircraft". London: Hermes House, 2003. ISBN 1-84309-444-4.
  6. Sharpe, Michael. "Biplanes, Triplanes, and Seaplanes". London: Friedman/Fairfax Books, 2000, p. 270. ISBN 1-58663-300-7.
  7. "United States Air Force Museum Guidebook". Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio: Air Force Museum Foundation, 1975, p. 9.

Torpedo, Olkhovskij

Torpedo, Olkhovskij - 1917
Torpedo, Olkhovskij

The Torpedo was a two-seat fighter with a wooden monocoque fuselage. It was the first such aircraft built in Russia. The aircraft had very clean lines, it's engine was completely covered with a cowling and the propeller was fitted with a large spinner. The design proved to be unsuccessful because the split wing resulted in increased drag and a loss of lift. One plane was built at the Anatra factory in February 1917, and was flown on March 6-20 in Odessa. The aircraft flew well, but it was underpowered. This aircraft was used later as a trainer.

Torpedo, Olkhovskij
  • Type: two-seat fighter
  • National Origin: Russia
  • Designed By: V.M.Olkhovskij
  • Manufacturer: Anatra factory
  • Entered Service: 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône Model J, air-cooled 9 cylinder Rotary (82 kw)
  • Service Ceiling: (5000 m)
  • Climb:
    • 1000m 4.0min
    • 3000m 17.0min
  • Crew: 2
  • Amament: None

References

  1. Shavrov, V.B. "History of aircraft construction in the USSR (Istoriya Konstruktsij Samoletov v SSSR.)". Vol.1 Moskva, Mashinostroenie, 1994. p.199 ISBN 5-217-02528-X