Albatros D.I

Albatros D.I - 1916
Albatros D.I

The Albatros D.I was a German fighter aircraft used during World War I. Although its operational career was short, it was the first of the Albatros D types which equipped the bulk of the German and Austrian fighter squadrons (Jagdstaffeln) for the last two years of the war.

The D.I was designed by Robert Thelen, R. Schubert and Gnädig, as an answer to the latest Allied fighters, such as the Nieuport 11 Bébé and the Airco D.H.2, which had proved superior to the Fokker Eindecker and other early German fighters, and established a general Allied air superiority. It was ordered in June 1916 and introduced into squadron service that August.1

The D.I used a paneled plywood semi-monocoque fuselage, which was lighter and stronger than the fabric-skinned box-type fuselage then in common use, as well being easier to give an aerodynamically clean shape. On the other hand it was less costly to manufacture than a "full monocoque" fuselage. It was powered by either a 110 kW (150 hp) Benz Bz.III or a 120 kW (160 hp) Mercedes D.III six-cylinder watercooled inline engine. The D.I thus became the most powerful fighter aircraft yet introduced by the Luftstreitkräfte. The additional power enabled twin fixed Spandau machineguns to be fitted without any loss in performance.
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Albatros D.I
  • Role: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Albatros Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed By: Robert Thelen
  • Introduced: 1916
  • Primary User: German Empire Luftstreitkräfte
  • Number Built: 50
  • Powerplant:
  • 1 × Benz Bz.III six-cylinder watercooled inline engine 150 hp (110 kW)
  • or
  • 1 × Mercedes D.III six-cylinder watercooled inline engine 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 11 in (8.50 m)
  • Wing Area: 247 ft² (22.9 m²)
  • Length: 23 ft 3.5 in (7.40 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 8 in (2.95 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,422 lb (645 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 1,809 lb (898 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 110 mph (175 km/h)
  • Endurance: 1.5 hours
  • Service Ceiling: 9,840 ft (3,000 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 547 ft/min (2.8 m/s)
  • Crew: one pilot
  • Armament: 2 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. Albatros D.I. (2010, December 30). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 16:54, January 3, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Albatros_D.I&oldid=404943660
  2. Cheesman, E.F. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Harleyford Publications, P.108.
  3. Munson, Kenneth (1968). "Fighters, Attack and Training Aircraft 1914-1919 War". Blndford Press.
  4. Taylor, John W.R. (1969). "Albatros D.I and D.II. Combat Aircraft of the World from 1909 to the Present".. Putman.
  5. Grey & Thetford (1962-70). "German Aircraft of the First World War" (2nd ed.). Putnam & Company, p.39.

Albatros D.II

Albatros D.II - 1916
Albatros D.II

The Albatros D.II was a modified version of the Albatros D.I. Pilots complained that the D.I offered poor visibility from the cockpit. To solve this problem, the D.IIs upper wing was brought closer to the fuselage. Mounted to the fuselage in front of the pilot, the D.IIs twin, synchronous machine guns set the standard for other German and Allied fighters. By the end of 1916, increased production of the Albatros gave Germany numerical superiority in the air war.

Albatros designers Thelen, Schubert and Gnädig produced the D.II in response to pilot complaints about poor upward vision in the Albatros D.I. The solution was to reposition the upper wing 36 cm (14 in) closer to the fuselage and stagger it forward slightly. Rearrangement of the cabane struts also improved forward view. The D.II otherwise retained the same fuselage, engine installation, and armament as the D.I. Basic performance was unchanged. Idflieg ordered an initial batch of 100 D.II aircraft in August 1916.
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Albatros D.II
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Albatros Flugzeugwerke GmbH
  • Designed by: Robert Thelen
  • First Introduced: 1916
  • Powerplant: Mercedes D.IIIa, water cooled 6 cylinder in-line, 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wing Span: 27 ft 10.75 in (8.5 m)
  • Length: 24 ft 3 in (7.4 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 6.5 in (2.95 m)
  • Wing Area: 264 ft² (24.5 m²)
  • Empty weight: 1,404 lb (637 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,954 lbs (888 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 109 mph (175 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 17,060 ft (5,200 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 3 m/s (596 ft/min)
  • Endurance: 1 hour 30 mins
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. Albatros D.II, From Wikipedia "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albatros_D.II"
  2. Cheesman, E.F. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Harleyford Publications.
  3. Munson, Kenneth (1968). "Fighters, Attack and Training Aircraft of the 1914-1919 War". Blandford Press.
  4. Taylor, John W.R. (1969). "Albatros D.I and D.II. Combat Aircraft of the World from 1909 to the Present.". Putman.
  5. Grey & Thetford (1962-70). "German Aircraft of the First World War" (2nd ed.). Putnam &Company.

Albatros D.III

Albatros D.III - 1916
Albatros D.III

The Albatros D.III was a biplane fighter aircraft used by the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte) and the Austro-Hungarian Air Service (Luftfahrtruppen) during World War I. The D.III was flown by many top German aces, including Manfred von Richthofen, Ernst Udet, Erich Löwenhardt, Kurt Wolff, and Karl Emil Schäfer. It was the preeminent fighter during the period of German aerial dominance known as "Bloody April" 1917.

Work on the prototype D.III started in late July or early August 1916. The date of the maiden flight is unknown, but is believed to have occurred in late August or early September. Following on the successful Albatros D.I and D.II series, the D.III utilized the same semi-monocoque, plywood-skinned fuselage. At the request of the Idflieg (Inspectorate of Flying Troops), however, the D.III adopted a sesquiplane wing arrangement broadly similar to the French Nieuport 11. The upper wing was extended while the lower wing was redesigned with reduced chord and a single main spar. "V" shaped interplane struts replaced the previous parallel struts. For this reason, British aircrews commonly referred to the D.III as the "V-strutter."
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Albatros D.III
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Albatros-Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed by: Robert Thelen
  • First Flight : August 1916
  • Number Built: approximately 1866
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.IIIa inline water cooled engine, 170 hp (127 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 6 in (9.00 m)
  • Length: 24 ft 0 in (7.33 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 6 in (2.90 m)
  • Wing Area: 254 ft² (23.6 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 1,532 lb (695 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 1,949 lb (886 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 2,105 lb (955 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 94 kn, 109 mph (175 km/h) at sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 18,044 ft (5,500 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 886ft/min (4.5 m/s)
  • Wing Loading: 7.67 lb/ft² (37.5 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 0.081 hp/lb (0.13 kW/kg)
  • Range: 261 nmi, 300 mi (480 km)
  • Endurance: 2 hours
  • Crew: one
  • Armament: 2 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. "Albatros D.III", From Wikipedia "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albatros_D.III"
  2. Connors, John F. "Albatros Fighters In Action" (Aircraft No. 46). Carrollton, TX: Squadron/Signal Publications, Inc., 1981. ISBN 0-89747-115-6.
  3. Franks, Norman, Hal Giblin and Nigel McCrery. "Under the Guns of the Red Baron: Complete Record of Von Richthofen's Victories and Victims". London: Grub Street, 1998 p. 59. ISBN 1-84067-145-9.
  4. Grosz, Peter M. "Albatros D.III (Windsock Datafile Special)". Berkhamsted, Herts, UK: Albatros Publications, 2003 p. 6, p. 8, pp. 11, 13, p. 18-19, pp. 21-22. ISBN 1-90220-762-9.
  5. Grosz, Peter M., George Haddow and Peter Schiemer. "Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War I". Boulder, CO: Flying Machines Press, 2002 p. 249, p. 251. ISBN 1-89126-805-8.
  6. Mikesh, Robert C. "Albatros D.Va. : German Fighter of World War I". Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1980. ISBN 0-87474-633-7
  7. Van Wyngarden, Greg. "Albatros Aces of World War I Part 2" (Aircraft of the Aces No. 77). Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2007 p. 19. ISBN 1-84603-179-6

Fokker B.II

Fokker B.II - 1916
Fokker B.II

The Fokker B.II designation was shared by two different unarmed German observation aircraft of World War I. One was developed from the same M.17 prototype that had been developed into the Fokker D.II fighter, and the other from the M.10. Both machines had a crew of two and resembled the B.I.

Fokker B.II
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Fokker-Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed by: Martin Kreutzer
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Powerplant: 1× Oberursel U.0, air cooled 9 cylinder in-line, rotary engine, 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: 32 ft 7 in (9.94 m)
  • Wing Area: 297 ft² (27.6 m²)
  • Length: 24 ft 7 in (7.49 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 2 in (2.5 m)
  • Maximum Speed: 56 mph (90 km/h)
  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer

References

  1. "Fokker B.II", From Wikipedia "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_B.II_(1916)"
  2. "World Aircraft Information Files". London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 894 Sheet 40.

Fokker D.I

Fokker D.I - 1916
Fokker D.I

The Fokker D.I (company designation M.18) was a development of the D.II fighter. The D.I was also flown in Austro-Hungarian service as a reconnaissance aircraft under the designation B.III. Confusing the matter further, both the D.II and D.I arrived at the Front in German service at similar times, in July-August 1916. The main designer was Martin Kreutzer.

Similar to the D.II, the D.I was an unstaggered single-bay equal-span biplane. The upper fuselage was parallel with the upper wing. Unlike the D.II, the D.I was fitted with the 100 hp (75 kW) Mercedes D.I six cylinder water-cooled engine.

Control was achieved using wing-warping. The wings were also tested in twin bay form. To improve visibility, the center section was cut into and the wings were slightly staggered.
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Fokker D.I and B.III
  • Type: Fighter aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Fokker-Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed By: Martin Kreutzer
  • Introduced: 1916
  • Produced: July 1916
  • Number Built: 144
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Developed from: Fokker D.II
  • Variants: D.III and D.IV.
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.II inline six-cylinder water-cooled engine, 120 hp (89 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 8 in (9.05 m)
  • Wing Area: 215.3 ft² (20.00 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 8 in (6.30 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 4 in (2.55 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,020 lb (463 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,477 lb (670 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 81 kn, 93 mph (150 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: 656 ft/min (3.33 m/s)
  • Endurance: 1.5 hours
  • Crew: One, pilot
  • Armament: 1 × forward-firing synchronised 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine gun

References

  1. "Fokker D.I", From Wikipedia "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_D.I"
  2. Gray, Peter and Thetford, Owen. "German Aircraft since the First World War". London:Putnam, 1962.
  3. Green William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York: Smithmark, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8
.

Fokker D.II

Fokker D.II - 1916
Fokker D.II

The Fokker D.II was a German fighter biplane of World War I. It was a single seat fighter aircraft developed before the Fokker D.I. It was based on the M.17 prototype, with single-bay unstaggered wings and a larger fuselage and shorter span than production D.IIs. Using a 75 kW (100 hp) Oberursel U.I, the D.II was underpowered, though the single 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine gun was normal for 1916. The German Army purchased 177.

In service, the D.II proved to be little better than the earlier Fokker Eindecker fighters - in particular, it was outclassed by the superior French Nieuport 11 and 17. Several Fokker D.IIs were used by the Kampfeinsitzerkommandos and the early Jagdstaffeln alongside the Halberstadt D.II but the early Fokker biplanes were quickly discarded when the new Albatros fighters came out.

Fokker D.II
  • Manufacturer: Fokker-Fluzeugwerke
  • Designed by: Martin Kreutzer
  • Engine:
    • 1 × Oberursel U.I air cooled 9 cylinder in-line, rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
    • 1× Oberursel U.II, air cooled 9 cylinder in-line, rotary engine, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 28 ft 9 in (8.75 m)
  • Length: 21 ft 0 in (6.40 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 4 in (2.55 m)
  • Wing area: 194 ft² (18.0 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 847 lb (384 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,268 lb (575 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 93 mph (150 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 13,125 ft (4,000 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 820 ft/min (4.2 m/s)
  • Range: 124 miles (200 km)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × fixed, forward-firing synchronised 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine gun

References

  1. "Albatros D.II", From Wikipedia "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_D.II"
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions. pp. 399.
  3. "World Aircraft Information Files". London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 894 Sheet 40.

Fokker D.III

Fokker D.III - 1916
Fokker D.III

The Fokker D.III (Fokker designation M.19) was a German single-seat fighter aircraft of World War I.

The M.19 began as an effort to improve the performance of the Fokker D.II (Fokker designation M.17). The M.19 featured the Oberursel U.III 14-cylinder, two-row rotary engine, combined with the two-bay wing cellule of the Fokker D.I. The U.III engine, first used in the Fokker E.IV, required a revised fore-and-aft mount and a strengthened fuselage. The prototype M.19 arrived at Adlershof for testing on 20 July 1916. Idflieg issued a production order for 50 aircraft at that time, followed by orders for an additional 60 aircraft in August and 100 in November. The new aircraft was designated D.III by Idflieg.
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Fokker D.III
  • Role: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Fokker-Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed by: Martin Kreutzer
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Produced: 210
  • Powerplant: 1 × Oberursel U.III, air cooled 9 cylinder in-line, rotary engine, 120 kW (160 hp)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 8 in (9.05 m)
  • Wing Area: 215 ft² (20.0 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 8 in (6.30 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 4 in (2.55 m)
  • Empty Weight: 948 lb (430 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,565 lb 710 kg()
  • Maximum Speed: 100 mph (160 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 15,420 ft (4,700 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 940 ft/min (4.8 m/s)
  • Range: 137 miles (220 km)
  • Crew: one pilot
  • Armament: 2 × fixed forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine guns

References

  1. "Fokker D.III", From Wikipedia "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_D.III"
  2. Gray, Peter and Owen Thetford. "German Aircraft of the First World War". London: Putnam, 1962, p. 92. ISBN 0-93385-271-1
  3. Green, William and Gordon Swanborough. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York: Smithmark, 1994, p. 221. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  4. Lamberton, W.M., and E.F. Cheesman. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Letchworth: Harleyford, 1960, p. 120. ISBN 0-90043-501-1.
  5. Leaman, Paul. "Fokker Dr.I Triplane: A World War One Legend". Hersham, Surrey, UK: Classic Publications, 2003, p. 23. ISBN 1-90322-328-8.
  6. Van Wyngarden, Greg. "Early German Aces of World War I" (Aircraft of the Aces No. 73). Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2006, p. 10, p. 76. ISBN 1-84176-997-5.
  7. Van Wyngarden, Greg. "Jagdstaffel 2 Boelcke: Von Richthofen's Mentor" (Aviation Elite Units No. 26). Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2007. ISBN 1-84603-203-2.
  8. Weyl, A.R. "Fokker: The Creative Years". London: Putnam, 1965, pp. 122-123, p. 171-173. ISBN 0-85177-817-8.

Fokker D.IV

Fokker D.IV - 1916
Fokker D.IV

The Fokker D.IV was a German fighter biplane of World War I, this was the last variant in the development of the D.I. In the quest for improved performance it was fitted with the more powerful Mercedes D.III inline six-cylinder water-cooled engine, generating 160 hp (120 kW). The aircraft was fitted with twin fixed, forward-firing synchronised 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine guns. The upper wing was raised and the wing struts were strengthed by bracings configured in an N-pattern.

The aircraft was purchased in small numbers (40) by the German Army and the Swedes bought 4. The D.IV production life did not last long. It was soon superceded by newer and better designs. This type was soon overshadowed in 1917 by the higher performance D.VI and the iconic Fokker Dr.I triplane.

Fokker D.IV
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Albatros Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed by: Martin Kreutzer
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Number Built: 44
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.III inline six-cylinder water-cooled engine, 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 31 ft 10 in (9.70 m)
  • Wing Area: 226 ft² (21.0 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 0 in (6.30 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 0 in (2.75 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,336 lb (606 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,852 lb (840 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 100 mph (160 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: 1,100; 20 minutes to 13,100 Ft. ft/min (5.6 m/s)
  • Range: 137 miles (220 km)
  • Crew: one pilot
  • Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing synchronised 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine guns

References

  1. "Fokker D.IV," From Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_D.IV
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions. pp. 399.
  3. "World Aircraft Information Files". London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 894 Sheet 40-41.
  4. Green, William; Gordon Swanborough (1994). "The Complete Book of Fighters. London": Greenwich Editions. pp. 221.
  5. Lamberton, W. M. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Letchworth,Herts: Harleyford Publications Limited. pp. 218.

Halberstadt D.II

Halberstadt D.II - 1916
Halberstadt D.II

The Halberstadt D.II was not a particularly well received biplane fighter aircraft that served through the period of Allied air superiority in early 1916, but had begun to be replaced with the superior Albatros fighters by the autumn of that year. The Halberstadt D.II was underpowered, slow, lacking in firepower. It was unable to match the altitudes reached by other planes in the German arsenal.

If the only performance figures available for the type are accurate, the Halberstadt fighter's speed and climb were little better than the Eindecker's, and inferior to such Allied contemporaries as the Nieuport 11 and the D.H.2, but it earned the respect of Allied fighter pilots, and was the preferred mount of the pilots of the early Jagdstaffeln, until the Albatros D.I became available.
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Halberstadt D.II
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Halberstädter Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed by: Karl Theis
  • First flight: Late 1915
  • Introduced: Early 1916
  • Retired: 1917
  • Number Built: 85
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.II six cylinder in-line, 120 hp (90 kW)
  • Wingspan: 28 ft 11 in (8.8 m)
  • Length: 23 ft 11 in (7.3 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 9 in (2.67 m)
  • Wing Area: 254 ft² (23.6 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 1,144 lb (519 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,606 lb (728.5 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 90 mph (145 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: 15 min to 9,850 ft (3,000 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) lMG 08 "Spandau" machine gun

References

  1. "Halberstadt D.II", From Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halberstadt_D.II
  2. Cheesman, E.F. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Harleyford Publications.
  3. Munson, Kenneth (1968). "Fighters, Attack and Training Aircraft 1914-1919 War". Blndford Press.
  4. Grey & Thetford (1962-70). "German Aircraft of the First World War" (2nd ed.). Putnam & Company.
  5. Grosz, Peter M. (1996). "Halberstadt Fighters-Classics of World War I Aviation". Albatros Publications.

Roland D.II

LFG Roland D.II
Roland D.II

The D.II was a single-seat escort fighter, based on the structural principles of the C II, a wooden veneer shell fuselage. The deep fuselage filled to gap between the biplane wings completely. The production was hampered by a fire in the L.F.G. factory; about 20 were built. The Roland D.II suffered from a design flaw that limited the forward view of the pilot.

Roland D.II
  • Role: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft G.m.b.H.
  • First Flight: October 1916
  • Introduction: Early 1917
  • Number Built: 300
  • Developed From: Roland D.I
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.III, water cooled 6 cylinder in-line,160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 8.94 m
  • Length: 6.93 m
  • Empty Weight: 653 kg
  • Loaded Weight: 793 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 169 km/h
  • Service Ceiling: 5200 m
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × forward firing Spandau 7.92mm machine guns

References

  1. "LFG Roland D.II", From Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LFG_Roland_D.II
  2. Angelucci, Enzo (editor). "World Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft". London:Jane's, 1981. ISBN 0 7106 0148 4.
  3. Donald, David (editor). "The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft". London:Blitz, 1997. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.
  4. Gray, Peter and Thetford, Owen. "German Aircraft of the First World War". London: Putnam, 1962.
  5. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". London: Salamander Books, 1994. ISBN 0-83173-939-8.

LFG Roland D.III

LFG Roland D.III
LFG Roland D.III

The LFG Roland D.III was a fighter aircraft produced in Germany during World War I. It was a further development of the D.I fighter, itself derived from the C.II reconnaissance aircraft. These machines had a fuselage that completely filled the interplane gap, a design feature intended to improve aerodynamics. However, it also resulted in limiting the pilot's field of vision in the down and forward direction, leading to complaints. LFG attempted to remedy this in the D.III design by introducing a gap between the upper fuselage and the upper wing, braced by cabane struts. The size of the tailplane was also increased.

While this did indeed result in an improvement over the Roland D.II that had preceded it, the performance of the D.III was inferior to that of other contemporary fighters available to the German Army, in particular those produced by Albatros, and the aircraft was therefore only produced in small quantities.

Roland D.III
  • Role: Fighter
  • National Origin: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft G.m.b.H.
  • Designed By: Dipl Ing Tantzen
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Entered Service: 1917
  • Number Built: 100
  • Powerplant: 1 × Argus As.III, 134 hp (180 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 4 in (8.94 m)
  • Wing Area: 213 ft² (19.8 m²)
  • Length: 22 ft 5 in (6.84 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 1 in (2.76 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,580 lb (717 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 2,119 lb (961 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 109 mph (175 km/h)
  • Cruising Speed: 98 mph (156 km/h)
  • Endurance: 2 hours 30 min
  • Service Ceiling: 14,800 ft (4,500 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 880 ft/min (4.5 m/s)
  • Crew: One pilot
  • Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. "LFG Roland D.III". (2010, September 17). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 08:35, December 5, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=LFG_Roland_D.III&oldid=385429298
  2. "LFG Roland D.III". Retrieved 08:45, December 5, 2010, from http://www.airwar.ru/enc/fww1/lfgd3.html
  3. Taylor, Michael J. H. "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation".1989 p 576. London: Studio Editions.
  4. "World Aircraft Information Files". File 900 Sheet 06 London: Bright Star Publishing.

Siemens-Schuckert D.I

Siemens-Schuckert D.I - 1916
Siemens-Schuckert D.I

A number of captured Nieuport 17 fighters were given to German aircraft manufacturers to study, the Siemens-Schukert Werke produced the D.I based on the captured fighter. The D.I was a biplane powered by 110 hp (82 kW) Siemens-Halske Sh.I rotary engine. An order for 150 aircraft for the Imperial German Army Air Service was placed, but these were delayed by late delivery of the complicated geared engine, so that the aircraft was outclassed in combat by newer Allied aircraft when delivered. Only 95 aircraft were produced, most of which were used for training.

A single D.Ia was produced with a greater wing area and more powerful engine but was not ordered into production. The development continued through a prototype D.II to the D.III.

Siemens-Schuckert D.I
  • Role: Single-seat biplane fighter
  • Manufacturer: Siemens-Schuckert Werke
  • First Flight : 1916
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Number Built: 95
  • Developed From: Nieuport 17
  • Powerplant: 1× Siemens-Halske Sh.I geared rotary engine, 110 hp (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 24 ft 7.375 in 7.50 m()
  • Wing Area: 156 ft² (14.4 m²)
  • Length: 19 ft 8.25 in (6.0 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 5.875 in (2.59 m)
  • Empty Weight: 946 lb (430 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,485 lb (675 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 97 mph (155 km/h)
  • Endurance: 2 hr 20 min
  • Climb to: 13,125 ft (4,000 m) 24 min 18 sec
  • Crew: One
  • Armament: One or two × 7.92 mm LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. "Halberstadt D.II", From Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemens-Schuckert_D.I
  2. Green, W; Swanborough, G (1994). "The Complete Book of Fighters". Smithmark. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  3. Grey, Peter; Thetford, Owen (1962). "German Aircraft of the First World War". London: Putnam.
  4. "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft" (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.