Caudron G.III

Caudron G.III - 1914
Caudron G.III

The French Caudron G.III was a two seat, single-engined tractor biplane, with a twin-boom tail. The end of the lower booms was used as a landing skid. It was initially built in May of 1913. Its wing spars were of ash and spruce with reinforcing strips of metal. The wings had no dihedral. The design used wing warping, rather than ailerons, for controlling movement of the aircraft. Initially, the horizontal stabilizer also used warping, but later a hinged stabilizer was added. The aircraft was used as an Army cooperation and reconnaissance machine.

Caudron G.III
  • Type: Reconnaissance
  • Manufacturer: Caudron
  • Designed by: René and Gaston Caudron
  • Entered Service: 1914
  • Powerplant: Anzani 10 cylinder air cooled radial, 90 hp (67 kW)
  • Wing Span: 13.40 m
  • Length: 6.40 m
  • Height: 2.5 m
  • Wing Area: 290 ft² (27.00 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 420 kg
  • Loaded Weight: 710 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 112 mph
  • Service Ceiling: 14,110 ft (4,300 m)
  • Endurance: 4 hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: none

References

  1. From Wikipedia Caudron G.3, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caudron_G.III"
  2. Donald, David (Editor) (1997). "The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft". Aerospace Publishing, p.233. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.
  3. Holmes, Tony (2005). "Jane's Vintage Aircraft Recognition Guide". London: Harper Collins, p 26. ISBN 0 0071 9292 4.
  4. Kalevi Keskinen, Kyösti Partonen, Kari Stenman: "Suomen Ilmavoimat I 1918-27", 2005. ISBN 952-99432-2-9.
  5. Kalevi Keskinen, Kari Stenman, Klaus Niska: "Suomen ilmavoimien lentokoneet 1918-1939", Tietoteos, 1976.

Maurice Farman MF.7 "Longhorn"

Maurice Farman MF.7 Longhorn
Maurice Farman MF.7

The Maurice Farman MF.7 "Longhorn" is a French reconnaissance biplane developed before World War I, which served in both the French and British air services in the early stages of the war before being used as a trainer aircraft.

It had a single Renault "pusher" engine. Its name derived from the distinctive front-mounted elevator and elongated skids.

Farman MF.7
  • Type: Reconnaissance
  • Manufacturer: Farman Aviation Works
  • Designed by: Maurice Farman
  • Introduction: 1913
  • Retired: 1915
  • Primary Users:
    • France: French Air Force
    • Britian: Royal Flying Corps
  • Powerplant: 1× Renault 80 hp 8-cylinder air-cooled inline engine, 70 hp (52 kW)
  • Wingspan: 50 ft 5 in (15.40 m)
  • Length: 37 ft 2 in (11.35 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 4 in (3.45 m)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,885 lb (855 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 59 mph (95 km/h) at sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 13,123 ft (4,000 m)
  • Endurance: 3.5 hours
  • Crew: Two, pilot & observer
  • Armament: None

References

  1. Jackson, Robert, "The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft", Paragon, 2002. ISBN 0-75258-130-9
  2. Angelucci, Enzo (1983). "The Rand McNally encyclopedia of military aircraft, 1914-1980". The Military Press. pp. 21. ISBN 0-517-41021 4.

Maurice Farman MF.11 "Shorthorn"

Maurice Farman MF.11 - 1914
Maurice Farman MF.11 "Shorthorn"

The Maurice Farman MF.11 Shorthorn is a French reconnaissance and light bomber biplane developed during World War I by the Farman Aviation Works. It was essentially a Farman MF.7 with a more powerful engine, and a more robust and aerodynamic fuselage, which was raised above the lower wing on struts. The aircraft was also fitted with a machine gun for the observer, whose position was changed from the rear seat to the front in order to give a clear field of fire.

Its name derived from that of the MF.7 Longhorn, as it lacked the characteristic front-mounted elevator and elongated skids of its predecessor.

The MF.11 served in both the British and French air services on the Western Front in the early stages of the war. As a light bomber it flew the first bombing raid of the war when on 21 December 1914 an FM.11 of the Royal Naval Air Service attacked German artillery positions around Ostend, Belgium.

The MF.11 was withdrawn from front-line service on the Western Front in 1915, but continued to be used by the French in Macedonia and the Middle East, while the British also used it in the Dardanelles, Africa and Mesopotamia.
[Read more]

Maurice Farman MF.11
  • Type: Reconnaissance/Bomber/Trainer
  • Country: France
  • Manufacturers:
    • France: Farman Aviation Works
    • Great Britain: Airco
    • Italy: Societa Italiano Aviazione
  • First Flight: late 1913
  • Entered Service: May 1914
  • Produced: 1915 - 1916
  • Number Built: Unknown
  • Powerplant: Renault air-cooled V8 engine, 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wing Span: 51 ft 9 in (15.78 m)
  • Wing Area: 613 ft² (57.00 m²)
  • Length: 30 ft 6 in (9.3 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 4 in (3.15 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,442 lb (654 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,046 lb (928 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 72 mph (116 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: 3,280 ft (1,000 m) / 8 min
  • Service Ceiling: 12,467 ft (3,800 m)
  • Endurance: 3.75 hours
  • Crew: 1-2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 0.30 in Colt (7.5 mm) machine gun
    • Bombs: 18 × 16 lb (7.3 kg) bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Farman MF.11, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farman_MF.11"
  2. Taylor, Michael J H. "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". pg 805. Portland House, 1989. ISBN 0-517-69186-8
  3. Jackson, Robert, "The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft", Paragon, 2002. ISBN 0-75258-130-9

Voisin III (LA)

Voisin III
Voisin III (LA)

The Voisin III (or Voisin 3) was one of the first two-seat bomber and ground attack aircraft of World War I. It was a pusher biplane, developed by Aeroplanes Voisin of Gabriel Voisin in 1914 as a more powerful version of the 1912 Voisin I (Voisin 1) design. It also incorporated a light steel frame which made it survivable in the temporary airfields of wartime military aviation.

The Voisin III became the standard Allied bomber in the early years of the war. The main users were the French Air Force and the Imperial Russian Air Force. Russia ordered over 800 in France and built a further 400 under license at DUX in Moscow. Around 100 were built in Italy, and 50 in the United Kingdom, while smaller numbers were purchased by Belgium and Romania. [read more]

Voisin III (LA)
  • Type: Fighter/Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Aeroplanes Voisin
  • Designed by: Gabriel Voisin
  • First Flight: 1914
  • Entered Service: 1914
  • Number Built: over 800
  • Powerplant: 1× Salmson M.9 water-cooled radial engine, 130 hp (97 kW)
  • Wing Area: 49.7 m² (534 ft²)
  • Wingspan:
    • Upper WIng: 48 ft 4.31 in (14.74m)
    • Lower Wing: 41 ft 1.7 in (12.54 m)
  • Length: 31 ft 2 in (9.50 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 8 in (2.95 m)
  • Empty Weight: 2,094 lb (950 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,976 lb (1,350 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 57 knots, 65 mph (105 km/h) at sea level
  • Climb: to 3,300 ft (1,000 m): 12 min
  • Climb: to 6,600 ft (2,000 m): 30 min
  • Endurance: 4 ½ hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1× 0.303 in Lewis gun
    • Bombs: up to 91 kg (200 lb) of bombs

References

  1. Voisin III. (2010, May 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 01:56, July 7, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Voisin_III&oldid=362292592
  2. Angelucci, Enzo (1983). "The Rand McNally encyclopedia of military aircraft, 1914-1980". The Military Press. p. 21. ISBN 0-517-41021 4.
  3. Bruce, J.M. (1982). "The Aeroplanes of the Royal Flying Corps" (Military Wing). London: Putnam. ISBN 0 370 30084 x.
  4. Guttman, Jon, et. al. "Pusher Aces of World War 1". Osprey Pub Co, 2009. ISBN 1846034175, 9781846034176.