Airco D.H.5

Airco D.H.5
Airco D.H.5 - 1917

Unlike other biplane fighters of its day, the Airco D.H.5 featured an unusual wing configuration. By positioning the upper wing toward the rear of the cockpit, designer Geoffrey de Havilland was able to improve the pilot's field of vision. Despite this improvement, at high altitude the D.H.5 was a poor performer due to its underpowered engine. By the end of 1917, it was removed from combat and used as a trainer.

Airco D.H.5
  • Type: Fighter
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Aircraft Manufacturing Company. Ltd.
  • Entered Service: May 1917
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône 9J, 9 cylinder air cooled rotary, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wing Span: 25 ft 8 in 7.82 m
  • Length: 22 ft 6.71 m
  • Height: 9 ft 1.5 in 2.78 m
  • Loaded Weight: 1,492 lb 677 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 102 mph 164 km/h
  • Service Ceiling: 16,000 ft 4,877 m
  • Endurance: 2 hr 45 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Airco DH-5, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airco_DH.5"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "Warplanes of the First World War Vol. 1". London: MacDonald, 1965, p. 128-132.
  3. Jackson, A.J. "De Havilland Aircraft since 1915". London: Putnam, 1962.
  4. Lamberton, W.M. et al. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Lethworth, Herts, UK: Harleyford, 1960, p. 42-43.
  5. Taylor, John W.R. "D.H.5;. Combat Aircraft of the World from 1909 to the Present". New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1969. ISBN 0-425-03633-2.

Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10

Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10 - 1916
Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10 - 1916

The Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10 was a two-seat quadruplane built for fighting and bombing. Like its predecessor, the F.K.9, it was a poor performer with serious design flaws. Of the fifty aircraft ordered by the Royal Naval Air Service, only eight were delivered.

Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10
  • Type: Fighter/Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • First Introduced: 1916
  • Number Built: 8
  • Powerplant: Clerget 9B, 9 cylinder air cooled, 95kW
  • Wing Span: 8.48 m
  • Length: 6.78 m
  • Height: 3.5 m
  • Empty Weight: 560 kg
  • Loaded Weight: 916 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 153 km/h
  • Endurance: 2.5 hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 2 machine guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Armstrong Whitworth F.K.10, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armstrong_Whitworth_F.K.10"
  2. Bruce, J.M. (1965). Warplanes of the First World War, Fighters Volume One, Great Britain. London: Macdonald.
  3. Green, W.; Swanborough, G. (1994). The Complete Book of Fighters. New York: Smithmark, p.25. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  4. Mason, Francis K (1992). The British Fighter since 1912. Annapolis, Ma: Naval Institute Press., p.11-14 ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Avro 528

Avro 528 - 1916
Avro 528 - 1916

The Avro 528 was an unsuccessful large span single engined biplane built to an Admiralty contract in 1916. It carried a crew of two; only one was built.

Very little is known about the Avro 528 apart from a photograph and a general arrangement diagram. It was a two seat single engined biplane ordered by the Admiralty in 1915, and not even the task for which it was intended is recorded. It had some similarities with the Avro 519 (a single seater intended for the RFC) and the twin seat 519A, built for the RNAS, though neither of these were armed and both had 150 hp Sunbeam Nubian engines rather than the 225 hp Sunbeam of the 528. Both the 519s and the 528 had some shared features with the Naval Avro 504.
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Avro 528
  • Role: Two seat single engined biplane
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Avro
  • First flight: September 9, 1916
  • Retired: 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Sunbeam, 250 hp (187 kW)
  • Wingspan: 65 ft 0 in (19.82 m)
  • Length: 33 ft 8 in (10.26 m)
  • Gross weight: 5,509 lb (2,504 kg)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine gun in rear cockpit
    • provision for bombs in nacelles under lower wing

References

  1. Avro 528. (2010, May 20). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:39, December 9, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_528&oldid=363265695
  2. Jackson, A.J. (1965). Avro Aircraft since 1908, pp. 73-4, pp. 90-1. London:Putnam Publishing.
  3. Jackson, A.J. (1990). Avro Aircraft since 1908 (Second ed.), p. 150-151. London: Putnam. ISBN 0-85177-834-8.
  4. Mason, Francis K. (1994). The British Bomber since 1914, p. 70. London: Putnam. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.

Blackburn Triplane

Blackburn Triplane
Blackburn Triplane - 1917

The Blackburn Triplane was a single-engine pusher single-seater, designed specifically to attack Zeppelins. It flew in 1917, but was not successful.

The Triplane was the third unsuccessful attempt at an anti-Zeppelin fighter that involved Blackburn. The first was Blackburn's own Twin Blackburn and the second the AD Scout, Blackburn building two of the four machines of this type to an Air Department of the Admiralty design. In 1916, the Scout's designer, Harris Booth moved to Blackburn where he created a heavily-revised aircraft, the Triplane.
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Blackburn Triplane
Data from Jackson 1968, p. 101 No performnace data is known to exist
  • Type: Anti-airship fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Blackburn
  • Designed By: Harris Booth
  • Designed: 1916
  • First Flight: 1917
  • Accepted by Admiralty: Feb. 20, 1917
  • Retired: March 1917
  • Number Built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome rotary, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 24 ft 0 in (7.32 m)
  • Wing Area: 221 ft² (20.5 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 5.25 in (6.53 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × Recoilless Davis gun 2 lb (1 kg) shells

References

  1. From Wikipedia Blackburn Triplane, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackburn_Triplane"
  2. Jackson, A.J. (1968). Blackburn Aircraft since 1909. London: Putnam Publishing, pp. 98-101. ISBN 0 370 00053 6.

Kennedy Giant

Kennedy Giant

The creation of C.J.H. MacKenzie-Kennedy, the Kennedy Giant biplane bomber was aptly named. A huge aircraft for its time, it was also a giant design failure. Manufactured in Hayes, England by the Gramophone Company, Ltd., it was constructed out in the open because none of the Northolt Aerodrome hangars were large enough to contain it. Despite its four engines, the Kennedy Giant was so underpowered that once airborne it could do little more than fly in a straight line.

Kennedy Giant
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Kennedy Aeroplanes, Limitetd.
  • First Introduced: 1914
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 4 Salmson, 200 hp
  • Wing Span: 142 ft
  • Length: 80 ft
  • Empty Weight: 19,000 lb

RAF R.E. 7

RAF RE.7 - 1915
RAF RE.7 - 1915

The R.E. 7 has been called the most useless airplane ever made, and for some good reasons. Between it's top speed and the speed at which it stalled and spun out of control there was a margin of only twenty miles an hour. It was intended to have a top speed of 80 mph, but it usually managed only 60, and it's stall speed was 48 mph. This made take-offs, landings and manoeuvring in the air very difficult. It came armed with a forward firing machine gun mounted oblique to the aircraft to avoid the propeller. This made it very difficult to hit anything, as the aircraft had to be crabbed to one side when aiming at another plane. The observer could not stand, or turn around like in later aircraft, so a machine gun in the back was nearly ineffective as the observer had to aim it by leaning back and swivelling the gun while looking over his shoulder.

RAF RE7
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Royal Aircraft Factory
  • First Introduced: 1915
  • Type: Reconnaissance/Bomber
  • Number Built: 250
  • Powerplant: RAF 4a, air cooled 12 cylinder rotary, 150 hp (110 kW)
  • Speed: 82 mph (37 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 6,500 ft (1980 m)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 4 x Machine guns 1× 500 lb bomb

References

  1. From Wikipedia Royal Aircraft Factory RE-7, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Aircraft_Factory_R.E.7"
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions.
  3. "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft" (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing. pp. 2820.
  4. British Aircraft Directory

Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.

Sopwith L.R.T.Tr - 1916
Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.

The Sopwith Long Range Tractor Triplane (L.R.T.Tr) was a prototype British long-range three seat triplane escort fighter of the First World War. Of unusual layout, with a small gunner's nacelle mounted on the upper wing to give an all-round field of fire. Only a single example was built, other, smaller, fighters proving more practicable.
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Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.
  • Role: Escort fighter
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith
  • First flight: 1916
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Rolls-Royce Eagle water-cooled V12 engine, 250 hp (187 kW)
  • Wingspan: 52 ft 9 in (16.08 m)
  • Length: 35 ft 3 in (10.75 m)
  • Maximum speed: approx 107 mph (172 km/h)
  • Crew: 3 (pilot and two gunners)
  • Armament:
  • 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun in nacelle
  • 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun in rear cockpit

References

  1. Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.. (2010, September 22). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 19:22, November 28, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sopwith_L.R.T.Tr.&oldid=386348868
  2. Sopwith L.R.T.Tr. Virtual Aircraft Museum 1916 http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/sopwith_lrtt.php
  3. Sopwith LRTTr. (1916) (England) http://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww1planes/ww1-english/36180/view/sopwith_l_r_t_tr_(1916)_(england)/
  4. Bruce, J.M. British Aeroplanes 1914-18. London:Putnam, p.25, 1957.
  5. Bruce, J.M. War Planes of the First World War: Volume Two Fighters. London:Macdonald, 1968, pp. 139-142. ISBN 0 356 01473 8.
  6. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. The Complete Book of Fighters. New York:Smithmark, p.535, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  7. Lewis, Peter. The British Fighter since 1912. London:Putnam, Fourth edition, p.99, 1979. ISBN 0 370 10049 2.
  8. Mason, Francis K. The British Fighter since 1912. Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, p.67, pp.78-79, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7
  9. Gunston, Bill "Back to the Drawing Board: Aircraft That Flew But Never Took Off". First Edition edition (Jun 1996) Airlife Publishing Ltd; ISBN-10: 1853107581

Sopwith Bulldog

Sopwith Bulldog

Overweight and clumsy, the Sopwith Bulldog two-seater biplane was heavily armed with two forward firing machine guns and two independently mounted machine guns in the rear. Only two of them were built during World War I.

Sopwith Bulldog
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • Type: Fighter
  • First Introduced: 1917
  • Number Built: 2
  • Powerplant: Clerget 11B, air cooled rotary, 200 hp
  • Wing Span: 10.29 m
  • Length: 7 m
  • Height: 2.67 m
  • Empty Weight: 645 kg
  • Loaded Weight: 1132 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 175 km/h
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 4 machine guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Sopwith Bulldog, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Bulldog"
  2. Bruce, J.M. War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three Fighters. London:Macdonald, 1969. ISBN 0356 01490 8.
  3. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. The Complete Book of Fighters. New York:Smithmark, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  4. Mason, Francis K. The British Fighter since 1912. Annapolis, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.