Austin-Ball A.F.B.1

Austin-Ball A.F.B.1
Austin-Ball A.F.B.1

The Austin-Ball A.F.B.1 was a British fighter plane of World War I built by car manufacturer Austin with input from Britain's leading fighter ace at the time, Albert Ball. Ball's father, Albert Ball Sr., was on the Board of Directors of Austin, and used his influence on behalf of his son to have the ace's sketches and specifications considered by the company. Young Albert Ball's design ideas were taken from the Nieuport that he was flying at the time. Actual design of the craft was by C. H. Brooks.

It was a biplane of largely conventional configuration with unstaggered, equal-span wings. The top wing was attached to the upper fuselage, granting the pilot excellent visibility on all sides and above. The armament was unusual: the fixed, forward-firing Lewis gun fired through the hollow propeller shaft; but its muzzle was located aft of the powerplant. A second Lewis gun with an upwards firing arc was mounted on the upper wing. This weapon, combined with the excellent topside visibility was well-suited to Ball's favoured method of attack, from below the enemy.
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Austin-Ball A.F.B.1
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: Austin Motor Company
  • Designed By: C. H. Brooks
  • First flight: July 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hispano-Suiza 8 V-8, 200 hp (150 kW)
  • Wingspan: 30 ft (9.14 m)
  • Wing area: 290 ft² (26.9 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 6 in (6.55 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 3 in (2.84 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,525 lb (693 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 2,077 lb (942 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 138 mph (222 km/h)
  • Endurance: 2 hrs 15 min
  • Service Ceiling: 22,000 ft (6,700 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 1,120 ft/min (5.7 m/s)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • 1 × fixed, forward-firing .303 (7.7 mm) Lewis gun
    • 1 × hinged upward-firing .303 (7.7 mm) Lewis gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Austin-Ball A.F.B.1, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austin-Ball_A.F.B.1"
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions. pp. 85.
  3. "World Aircraft Information Files". London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 889 Sheet 85.

Avro 529

Avro 529 - 1917
Avro 529 - 1917

The Avro 529 was a twin-engined biplane long-range bomber of the First World War. Two prototypes were built but no production ensued.

The Avro 529 was Avro's second twin-engined aircraft and their second attempt at a heavy bomber. Their first in both categories was the Pike, developed in early 1916 to Royal Flying Corps (RFC) guidelines for a short-range bomber. The Pike arrived too late to secure orders from the RFC who would order the Handley-Page O/100 and for the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) who had ordered the Short Bomber. Nonetheless, after trials of the Pike, the Admiralty ordered two prototypes of an enlarged Pike for a long range bomber role. This was the Type 529.

Like the Pike, it was a large twin-engined biplane of the then-standard wood and canvas construction. It had three-bay wings without sweepback, dihedral or stagger, partly to facilitate wing folding. The vertical tail was different to that of the Pike: it had a small, roughly triangular fin and a rudder with a round balance surface above the fin, a reminder of Avro's "comma" rudder form.
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Avro 529A
  • Role: Long range bomber
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: A.V. Roe & Co.
  • First flight: April 1917
  • Number built: 2
  • Developed from: Avro Pike
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 2 × B.H.P. (Galloway built), 230 hp (170 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 64 ft 1 in (19.53 m)
  • Wing area: 910 ft² (84.54 m²)
  • Length: 39 ft 8 in (12.09 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 0 in (3.96 m)
  • Empty weight: 4,361 lb (1,978 kg)
  • Gross weight: 7,135 lb (3,236 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 116 mph (187 km/h)
  • Endurance: 5.25 hours
  • Service ceiling: 17,500 ft (5,335 m)
  • Rate of climb: to 5,000 ft (1525 m) 715 ft/min (3.6 m/s)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • 20 × 50 lb (23 kg) bombs
    • 1 × trainable 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun on Scarff ring in nose
    • 1 × trainable 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun on Scarff ring in dorsal position

References

  1. Avro 529. (2011, January 21). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 06:09, January 28, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_529&oldid=409163298
  2. Jackson, A.J. "Avro Aircraft since 1908". 1965, pp. 92-94. London: Putnam Publishing.

Avro 530

Avro 530 - 1917
Avro 530

Of relatively clean aerodynamic design by contemporary standards and featuring a ducted propeller spinner, the Avro 530 two-seat fighter was designed in 1916 to compete with the Bristol F.2A, but the first prototype was not flown until July 1917. Powered by a 200hp Hispano- Suiza 8Bd eight-cylinder water-cooled engine, the Avro 530 was of wooden construction with fabric skinning, and mounted an armament of a single fixed and synchronised 7.7mm Vickers gun, a Lewis gun of similar calibre being mounted on a Scarff ring in the rear cockpit. Although performance of the Avro 530 proved to be good, it did not improve sufficiently on that of the Bristol F.2A to warrant production orders. Furthermore, priority in the supply of the Hispano- Suiza engine was being given to the S.E.5a. During 1918, one of the two Avro 530 prototypes was flown with a 200hp Sunbeam Arab engine, revised undercarriage, an extended tail fin and flapless wings of new section with long-span ailerons, but development was subsequently

Avro 530
  • Role: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Avro
  • First flight: 1917
  • Number built: 2
  • Status: Prototype
  • Wingspan: 36 ft 0 in (10.97 m)
  • Wing area: 325.5 ft² (30.23m²)
  • Length: 28 ft 6 in (8.69 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 7 in (2.92 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,695 lb (769 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 2,680 lb (1,216 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1× Hispano-Suiza 8Bd eight cylinder water-cooled engine, 200 hp (149 kW)
  • Maximum speed: 114 mph (183 km/h) 102 mph (164 km/h) at 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Time to 10,000 ft: 15 minutes
  • Endurance: 4 hours
  • Crew: One
  • Armament:
  • Guns:
    • Forward: 1 × engine mounted .303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun
    • Rear: 1 × rear mounted .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun

References

  1. Avro 530. (2010, September 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 00:53, November 18, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_530&oldid=384956362
  2. Avro 530 1917 The Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 00:55, November 18, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/avro-530.php
  3. William Green and Gordon Swanborough. The Complete Book of Fighters. Colour Library Direct, Godalming, UK: 1994. ISBN 1-85833-777-1.

Beardmore W.B.IV

Beardmore W.B.IV-1917
Beardmore W.B.IV

The Beardmore W.B.IV was a British single-engine biplane ship-based fighter of World War I developed by William Beardmore and Company. Only one was built.

The W.B.IV was designed to meet Admiralty Specification N.1A for a naval land or ship based fighter aircraft. The design was dominated by the demands of safely ditching and remaining afloat, with a large permanent flotation chamber built into the fuselage under the nose. The pilot was in a watertight cockpit over the propeller shaft, with the Hispano-Suiza V-8 engine behind him over the center of gravity of the aircraft. The entire undercarriage could be released from the plane for water landings. The wing tips were fitted with additional floats, while the aircraft's two-bay wings could fold for storage on board ship.

The single prototype first flew at Beardmore's Dalmuir factory on 12 December 1917, being delivered for evaluation at Martlesham Heath in July 1918. The W.B.IV had poorer performance than the much simpler and smaller Sopwith 2F.1 Camel and was not developed further.The sole prototype was lost when it sank during ditching.

Beardmore W.B.IV
  • Type: Fighter
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Beardmore
  • Designed by: G Tilghman Richards
  • First flight: 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hispano-Suiza 8 water-cooled V-8 piston engine, 200 hp (149 kW)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 10 in (10.92 m)
  • Wing area: 350 ft² (32.5 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 10.5 in (3.01 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,960 lb (891 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,600 lb (1,182 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 110 mph (177 km/h)
  • Endurance: 2 hours 30 min
  • Service ceiling: 14,000ft (4,270 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • 1 × synchronized 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun
    • 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun on tripod mounting

References

  1. "Beardmore W.B.IV". (2010, June 1). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 02:21, September 5, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Beardmore_W.B.IV&oldid=365332294
  2. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume 1 Fighters". London: Macdonald (1965), p.74-73.
  3. Mason, Francis K . "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland US: Naval Institute Press. (1992), pp.116-117.ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1990). "Jane's Fighting Aircraft of World War I". London: Studio Editions. p. 57.

Blackburn Triplane

Blackburn Triplane
Blackburn Triplane

The Blackburn Triplane was a single-engine pusher single-seater, designed specifically to attack Zeppelins. It flew in 1917, but was not successful.

The Triplane was the third unsuccessful attempt at an anti-Zeppelin fighter that involved Blackburn. The first was Blackburn's own Twin Blackburn and the second the AD Scout, Blackburn building two of the four machines of this type to an Air Department of the Admiralty design. In 1916, the Scout's designer, Harris Booth moved to Blackburn where he created a heavily-revised aircraft, the Triplane.
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Blackburn Triplane
Data from Jackson 1968, p. 101 No performnace data is known to exist
  • Type: Anti-airship fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Blackburn
  • Designed By: Harris Booth
  • Designed: 1916
  • First Flight: 1917
  • Accepted by Admiralty: Feb. 20, 1917
  • Retired: March 1917
  • Number Built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome rotary, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 24 ft 0 in (7.32 m)
  • Wing Area: 221 ft² (20.5 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 5.25 in (6.53 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × Recoilless Davis gun 2 lb (1 kg) shells

References

  1. From Wikipedia "Blackburn Triplane", ;http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackburn_Triplane
  2. Jackson, A.J. (1968). "Blackburn Aircraft since 1909". London: Putnam Publishing, pp. 98-101. ISBN 0 370 00053 6.

Mann Egerton Type H

Mann Egerton Type H
Mann Egerton Type H

The Mann Egerton Type H, also known as the Mann Egerton H.2, was an unsuccessful British ship-borne fighter aircraft designed in 1916.

The Type H was the first original design by Mann Egerton, and was designed by J W Carr according to Air Ministry specification N.1a in 1916. Its biplane wings could be folded manually (a feature first introduced in 1913 on the Short Folder), due to its intended use as a naval fighter. Other features of the design were the use of flotation chambers and a float attached to the underside of the fuselage for extra buoyancy. An innovation was that the undercarriage could be jettisoned if the aircraft needed to land on water. However, in autumn 1917, the aircraft failed flotation tests, and a new aircraft prototype, the Type H Mk II was developed.

This aircraft had inflatable flotation bags in place of the large float on the Mk I, a more conventional undercarriage and a horn-balanced rudder. This aircraft was tested in December 1917, however it was determined as unfit for production in the Fleet Air Arm and further development was discontinued.

Mann Egerton Type H Mk II
  • Type: Shipboard fighter
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Mann Egerton
  • Designed by: J W Carr
  • First flight: Autumn 1917
  • Number built: 2
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hispano-Suiza 8Bd eight-cylinder water cooled engine, 200 hp (149 kW)
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 9 in (9.37 m)
  • Wing Area: 310 ft² (28.80 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 11 in (6.68 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 11.5 in (2.73 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1760 lb (798 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 2326 lb (1055 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 113 mph (182 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours 15 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
  • 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers gun mounted to port on the fuselage
  • 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun mounted above the wing center section

References

  1. "Mann Egerton Type H". (2008, August 25). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 23:45, August 5, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mann_Egerton_Type_H&oldid=234206123
  2. Green, William; Gordon Swanborough. "The Complete Book of Fighters". Godalming, UK: Salamander Books. pp. 44.

Port Victoria PV.5

Port Victoria PV.5 - 1917
Port Victoria PV.5

Shortly after the Depot initiated work on the P.V.4, it was asked to develop a single-seat fighter seaplane also capable of performing light bombing tasks with two internally-stowed 30kg bombs. To meet this requirement, two different aircraft were designed and built, the P.V.5 and the P.V.5a. The former was developed from the P.V.2bis and employed a similar sesquiplane wing cellule devoid of flying wires and braced by struts to the float undercarriage. The wings employed a high-lift aerofoil section, the armament comprised a single synchronised 7.7mm machine gun plus the two 30kg bombs specified and power was provided by a 150hp Hispano- Suiza engine. Fitted with pontoon-type floats rather than the Linton Hope floats for which it had been designed, the P.V.5 was flight tested in mid-1917 with promising results, but the original requirement had been overtaken and development was discontinued.

Port Victoria PV.5
  • Type: Single seat floatplane
  • National Origin: Britian
  • First Flight: 1917
  • Manufacturer: RNAS Marine Experimental Depot, Port Victoria
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hispano- Suiza engine 150hp
  • Wingspan: 32 ft 0 in (9.75 m)
  • Wing Area: 244.99 ft² (22.76 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 6 in (7.77 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 9 in (2.97 m)
  • Take-off Weight: 2456 lb (1114 kg)
  • Empty Weight: 1788 lb (811 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 94 mph (151 km/h)
  • Crew: one
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers gun
    • Bombs: 2 × internally-stowed 30kg bombs

References

  1. "Port Victoria P.V.5 1917" Virtual Aircraft Museum Retreived from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/portvictoria_pv-5.php
  2. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  3. Green, William and Gordon Swanborough. "The Complete Book of Fighters". London: Salamander Books, 1994. ISBN 0-83173-939-8.
  4. Bruce, J.M. British "Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957.

Port Victoria P.V.7

Port Victoria PV.7 - Grain Kitten - 1917
Port Victoria PV.7 - Grain Kitten - 1917

The Port Victoria P.V.7 Grain Kitten was a prototype British Fighter aircraft of the First World War designed and built by the Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot on the Isle of Grain. A very small and light biplane intended to fly off platforms on Royal Navy Destroyers, it was unsuccessful, only a single prototype being built.

Following Royal Navy experience in operating land planes from platforms on ships, in late 1916, the British Admiralty came up with the idea of a lightweight fighter aircraft, capable of flying off short platforms on the forecastle of Destroyers in order to provide large numbers of aircraft at sea capable of intercepting and destroying German Airships. It therefore instructed the Marine Aircraft Experimental Department at Port Victoria on the Isle of Grain, and the RNAS Experimental Flight at Eastchurch to each produce a design to meet this requirement.
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P.V.7 Grain Kitten
  • Role: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: RNAS Marine Experimental Depot, Port Victoria
  • Designed by: W H Sayers
  • First flight: 22 June 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1× ABC Gnat two-cylinder horizontally-opposed air-cooled, 35 hp (26 kW)
  • Wingspan: 18 ft 0 in (5.49 m)
  • Wing area: 85 ft² (7.9 m²)
  • Length: 14 ft 11 in (4.55 m)
  • Height: 5 ft 3 in (1.60 m)
  • Empty weight: 284 lb (129 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 491 lb (223 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 74 knots (85 mph, 137 km/h) at 6,500 ft (1,980 m)
  • Service ceiling: 11,900 ft (3,630 m)
  • Wing loading: 5.77 lb/ft² (28.2 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.071 hp/lb (0.12 kW/kg)
  • Climb to: 6,500 ft (1,980 m) 10 min 50 s
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × .303 in Lewis gun above upper wing.

References

  1. "Port Victoria PV7 Grain Kitten - airship interceptor" Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 01:03, November 9, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/portvictoria_pv-7.php
  2. "Port Victoria PV7 Grain Kitten (1917) (England)" The-Blueprints.com, Retrieved 12:03, October 19, 2010, from http://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww1planes/ww1-english/36145/view/port_victoria_p_v_7_grain_kitten_%281917%29_%28england%29/
  3. "Port Victoria P.V.7". (2010, September 18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 00:35, November 10, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Port_Victoria_P.V.7&oldid=385587956
  4. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume One Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1965.
  5. Collyer, David. "Babies Kittens and Griffons". Air Enthusiast, Number 43, 1991. Stamford, UK:Key Publishing. ISSN 0143 5450. pp. 50–55.
  6. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Port Victoria P.V.8 Eastchurch Kitten

Port Victoria PV.8 - Eastchurch Kitten - 1917
P.V.8 Eastchurch Kitten'

The Port Victoria P.V.8 Eastchurch Kitten was a prototype British fighter aircraft of the First World War designed and built by the Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot on the Isle of Grain. It was a small and light biplane with a conventional wheeled undercarriage intended to operate from platforms on small ships, but while it had good handling, an unreliable and underpowered engine meant that the aircraft did not enter production, only the one prototype being built.

In 1916, the British Admiralty produced a requirement for a small single seater fighter landplane intended to fly off short platforms on the forecastle of the Royal Navy's Destroyers and other small ships to provide a widely distributed airship interceptor. Orders were placed with the RNAS Experimental Flight at Eastchurch and the Marine Aircraft Experimental Department at Port Victoria on the Isle of Grain for single prototypes to meet this requirement.
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Port Victoria P.V.8
  • Role: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: RNAS Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot, Port Victoria
  • Designed by: G H Millar
  • First flight: September 7, 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 1
  • Wingspan: 18 ft 11½ in (5.78 m)
  • Wing area: 106 ft² (9.85 m²)
  • Length: 15 ft 7½ in (4.76 m)
  • Height: 5 ft 2 in (1.58 m)
  • Empty weight: 340 lb (155 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 586 lb (266 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1× ABC Gnat two-cylinder horizontally-opposed air-cooled, 35 hp (26 kW)
  • Maximum speed: 82 knots (94.5 mph, 152 km/h) at 2,500 ft (760 m)
  • Service ceiling: 14,900 ft (4,540 m)
  • Wing loading: 5.53 lb/ft² (27.0 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.060 hp/lb (0.098 kW/kg)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × 0.303 in Lewis gun above upper wing.

References

  1. "Port Victoria P.V.8". (2010, September 18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 00:32, November 9, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Port_Victoria_P.V.8&oldid=385587921
  2. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume One Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1965.
  3. Collyer, David. "Babies Kittens and Griffons". Air Enthusiast, Number 43, 1991. Stamford, UK:Key Publishing. ISSN 0143 5450. pp. 50–55.
  4. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York:Smithmark, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  5. Mason, Francis K. The British Fighter since 1912. Annapolis, Maryland:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Port Victoria P.V.9

Port Victoria PV.9 - 1917
Port Victoria PV.9

The Port Victoria P.V.9 was a British single-seat biplane floatplane fighter of the First World War. Although claimed to be the best aircraft of its type yet to be tested, only a single prototype was built.

In mid-1917, the RNAS Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot at Port Victoria on the Isle of Grain was instructed to build a new single-seat floatplane fighter as a possible replacement for the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS)'s Sopwith Babys. The new aircraft was to combine the good manoeuvrability and pilot view of Port Victoria's earlier P.V.2 floatplane with superior speed.

Like the P.V.2, the new design, the Port Victoria P.V.9 was a single-engined sesquiplane (i.e. a biplane with its lower wing much smaller than its upper wing) braced with faired steel tubes. The fuselage, wider than that of the P.V.2, was mounted between the upper and lower wings, almost filling the inter-wing gap, giving an excellent view for the pilot. Armament was a Vickers machine gun synchronised to fire through the propeller disc, with a Lewis gun mounted above the upper wing firing over the propeller. Power was provided by a Bentley BR1 rotary engine. While the designers had hoped to use the same high-lift aerofoil section as used in the P.V.2, this was rejected by the Admiralty, who demanded the use of the more conventional RAF 15 aerofoil, which resulted in a larger aircraft with a reduced climb rate and ceiling.
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Port Victoria P.V.9
  • Role: Floatplane fighter
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: RNAS Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot
  • First flight: December 1917
  • Number built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Bentley BR1 9-cylinder air-cooled rotary engine, 150 hp (110 kW)
  • Upper wingspan: 30 ft 11 in (9.42 m)
  • Lower wingspan: 20 ft 1 in (6.12 m)
  • Wing area: 227 ft² (21.1 m²)
  • Airfoil: RAF 15
  • Length: 25 ft 2 in (7.67 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 0 in (2.74 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,404 lb (637 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,965 lb (891 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 34.5 Imp Gallons
  • Maximum speed: 110.5 mph (177.8 km/h; 96.0 kn) at 2,000 ft (610 m)
  • Service ceiling: 11,500 ft (3,505 m)
  • Time to altitude: 3 min 10 s to 2,000 ft (610 m), 27 min 20 s to 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Endurance: 2.5 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7mm) synchronised Vickers machine gun and 1× 0.303 in (7.7mm) Lewis gun above upper wing

References

  1. "Port Victoria P.V.9". (2010, September 18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 00:02, November 9, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Port_Victoria_P.V.9&oldid=385587893
  2. "Port Victoria P.V.9 1917" Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 00:03, November 9, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/portvictoria_pv-9.php
  3. "Port Victoria PV.9" (in Russian) http://www.airwar.ru/enc/fww1/pv9.html
  4. Bruce, J.M. British "Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957.
  5. Collyer, David. "Babies Kittens and Griffons". Air Enthusiast, Number 43, 1991. Stamford, UK:Key Publishing. ISSN 0143 5450. pp. 50-55.
  6. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.9

RAF FE.9 - 1917
RAF FE.9 S/n A 4818 - 1917

The Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.9 was a prototype British two seat fighter-reconnaissance aircraft of the First World War. A single-engined pusher biplane of 1917, the F.E.9 had poor performance and handling, and only three were built.

In summer 1916, the Royal Aircraft Factory set out to design a replacement for its F.E.2b two-seat pusher fighter. The F.E.9 was of similar pusher configuration and therefore already obsolescent by the time it appeared in 1917. Although effective gun synchronising gear was now available, which would allow a tractor design with superior performance to be designed, the factory chose to continue the pusher layout of the F.E.2 in its new two seat fighter, the F.E.9. Emphasis was placed in the design upon providing the gunner with a good field of fire and the pilot a good all-round view. Its nacelle extended well forward of the wings and was located high up in the wing gap to give a good field of fire for the observer, who was seated in the nose, ahead of the pilot, with dual controls fitted. It had unequal span, single-bay wings, with ailerons on the upper wing only with large horn balances (the amount of control surface forward of the hinge). It was powered by a 200 hp (149 kW) Hispano-Suiza 8 V8 engine, with the Royal Aircraft Factory having priority for this important and widely used engine.
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F.E.9 final layout
  • Role: Two-seat fighter aircraft
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Royal Aircraft Factory
  • Operators: United Kingdom Royal Flying Corps
  • First Flight: April 1917
  • Number built: 3
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hispano-Suiza 8 water-cooled V8 engine, 200 hp (149 kW)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 9½ in (11.52 m)
  • Wing area: 365 sq ft (33.9 m²)
  • Length: 28 ft 3 in (8.61 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 9 in (2.97 m)
  • Loaded weight: 2,480 lb (1,127 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 105 mph (91 knots, 169 km/h) at sea level
  • Service ceiling: 15,500 ft (7,730 m)
  • Climb to 5,000 ft (1,520 m): 8 min 25 sec
  • Climb to 10,000 ft (3,050 m): 19 min 50 sec
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns:
    • 1 × 0.303 in Lewis gun on Scarff ring in observer's cockpit
    • 1 × Lewis gun on pillar mounting between cockpits

References

Vickers F.B.24

Vickers F.B.24 - 1917
Vickers F.B.24

The Vickers F.B.24 was a British two-seat fighter aircraft of the First World War. Only a few prototypes were built, as although it had good performance, the Bristol F.2 Fighter was preferred.

In the early years of the First World War, Vickers Limited designed a number of aircraft to use the 150 hp (112 kW) Hart radial engine, the development of which was being funded by Vickers, including two single seat fighters, the F.B.12 pusher and the tractor F.B.16. A third design planned to use the Hart was the F.B.24, a two seat fighter reconnaissance aircraft.

The Hart engine proved to be unreliable, however, and was abandoned prior to the first prototype being completed in December 1916, and it became necessary to find a new powerplant for the F.B.24, with the Hispano-Suiza 8 being chosen. The first two prototypes, the F.B.24A and F.B.24B used a 150 hp Hispano-Suiza, with the first probably flying in March 1917. but were converted to use a 200 hp (149 kW) Hispano-Suiza, becoming the F.B.24D. The F.B.24D was a two-bay biplane with a rectangular section fuselage. The pilot and observer/gunner sat close together in separate open cockpits, with the pilot directly under the upper wings. Despite transparent panels built into the upper wings, the pilots view was very poor.
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Vickers F.B.24.24C
  • Role: Two-seat fighter
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers
  • First flight: 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: Aproximately 6
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lorraine-Dietrich 8Bd water-cooled V-8 engine, 275 hp (205 kW)
  • Upper wingspan: 37 ft 6 in (11.43 m)
  • Lower wingspan: 31 ft 0 in (9.45 m)
  • Wing area: 384 ft² (35.7 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,709 lb (775 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,650 lb (1,202 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 129.5 mph (208.4 km/h; 112.5 kn) at 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Service ceiling: 23,000 ft (7,010 m) (absolute ceiling)
  • Time to altitude:
    • 11 minutes to 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
    • 18 minutes to 15,000 ft (4,670 m)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Pilot: 2 × fixed, forward firing, .303 inch (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns
    • Observer: 1 × Lewis gun on Scarff ring in rear cockpit

References

  1. Vickers F.B.24. (2010, September 16). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:31, December 29, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Vickers_F.B.24&oldid=385149748
  2. Vickers F.B.24 1916 Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 07:32, December 29, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/vickers_fb-24.php
  3. Andrews, C.F. and E.B. Morgan. Vickers Aircraft since 1908. London:Putnam, 1988, pp. 63, 66, pp. 72-73. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  4. Bruce, J.M. British Aeroplanes 1914-18. London:Putnam, 1957, pp. 691-692.
  5. Bruce, J. M. War Planes of the First World War:Volume Three Fighters. London:Macdonald, 1969, pp. 118-120, pp. 122-123. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  6. Mason, Francis K. The British Fighter since 1912. Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992, p. 101. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  7. ""Milestones":The Vickers Machines". Flight, 12 June 1919. pp. 760-769.

Vickers F.B.26 Vampire I

Vickers F.B.26
F.B.26 Vampire I

The Vickers F.B.26 Vampire was a British single-seat biplane pusher fighter built by Vickers during the First World War. Four were built by Vickers at Bexleyheath, one of these was subsequently modified to become the F.B.26A.

The design was a development of the earlier Vickers F.B.12 prototypes; it was a single-bay biplane with a nacelle for the pilot and armament of two .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns. Behind this was a water-cooled 200 hp (150 kW) Hispano-Suiza engine driving the propeller. The tailplane was a boom-mounted single rudder.

From an initial two Lewis guns, the planned effectiveness of the armament was increased; firstly by adding flexibility in elevation, then by addition of an extra gun. With three guns capable of firing up at a 45° angle, the FB.26 was thought able to engage enemy bombers from below.
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F.B.26 Vampire I
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers
  • First Flight: May 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: 4
  • Developed From: Vickers F.B.12
  • Powerplant: 1× Hispano-Suiza 8 water cooled V-8, 200 hp (149 kW)
  • Wingspan: 31 ft 6 in (9.60 m)
  • Wing Area: 267 ft² (24.8 m²)
  • Length: 23 ft 5 in (7.14 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 5 in (2.87 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,467 lb (667 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,030 lb (923 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 105 kn (121 mph, 195 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,500 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 20,500 ft (6,250 m)
  • Wing Loading: 7.60 lb/ft² (37.2 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 0.099 hp/lb (0.16 kW/kg)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft (3,050 m) 10 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia "Vickers Vampire", http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_Vampire
  2. Andrews, C.F and Morgan, E.B. "Vickers Aircraft since 1908". London:Putnam, Second edition 1988. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1969. ISBN 356 01490 8.
  4. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York: Smithmark, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  5. Lamberton, W.M. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Herts, UK:Harleyford Publications, 1960.