Air Department AD Seaplane Type 1000

Air Department AD Seaplane Type 1000
Air Department AD Seaplane Type 1000 - 1916

The AD Seaplane Type 1000 also known as the Admiralty Type 1000 and the AD.1 (from Air Department) was a British seaplane of the First World War designed to attack German warships. When it first flew, it was the largest British aircraft yet to take to the air.

The design of the AD.1 was by Harris Booth of the Admiralty's Air Department just prior to World War I. It was the world's first aircraft designed from scratch as a torpedo bomber, one of the three planned versions of the plane. The other two were a bomber and a plane armed with a recoilless Davis 12-pounder gun (approximately 76 mm calibre).

The aircraft was a float-equipped biplane of pod-and-boom design, with engines mounted at the front of both booms, as well as at the rear of the crew pod. Development began in 1915; it was completed and flown for the first time during the summer of 1916. It was found that the Davis gun would project a blast rearwards so the weapon was changed for a conventional 12-pounder "Naval Landing Gun" though in practice a gun was never installed in the AD.1.
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AD Seaplane Type 1000
  • Type: Torpedo bomber, bomber
  • Manufacturer: J. Samuel White
  • Designed by: Harris Booth
  • First flight: 1916
  • Primary user: Royal Naval Air Service
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant:
    • 3 × Hispano-Suiza rotary engines, 100 hp (75 kW) each
    • or
    • 1 × Smith Static 10-cylinder air-cooled radial engine 150hp
  • Wingspan: 115 ft (35.1 m)
  • Wing area: (33.82 m² 364.04 ft²
  • Length: 64 ft 3 in (19.6 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 9 in (3.89 m)
  • Empty weight: 22,352 lb (10,160 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 27,900 lb (12,700 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 73 knots (84 mph, 135 km/h)
  • Range: 481 nm (553 mi, 885 km)
  • Service ceiling: 4,900 ft (1,500 m)
  • Crew: 5
  • Armament:
    • Gun: × 12 pdr gun
    • or
    • Torpedoes: 2 × 14 in, 810 lb (360 mm, 367 kg) torpedoes

References

  1. "Big Guns". Archived from the original on 2009-10-24. http://www.webcitation.org/5klUXJycs.
  2. http://www.localhistory.scit.wlv.ac.uk/Museum/Transport/planes/SunbeamEngines4.htm Accessed 29 January 2007
  3. AD Seaplane Type 1000. (2010, April 27). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:18, July 5, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=AD_Seaplane_Type_1000&oldid=358555548
  4. Goodall, Mike. "Wight Elephants: Murray Sueter's Quest for a Large Military Aircraft". Air Enthusiast, No. 73, January/February 1998. Stamford, Lincs, UK:Key Publishing. ISSN 0143 5450. pp.14-19.
  5. Mason, Francis K. The British Bomber since 1914. London:Putnam, 1994. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.

Armstrong Whitworth F.K.5 and F.K.6

Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.6 - 1916
Armstrong Whitworth F.K.6

The Armstrong Whitworth F.K.5 and F.K.6 were experimental triplanes built as escort fighters by Armstrong Whitworth during the First World War. They carried two gunners in nacelles mounted on the center wing. One example of each type was built, with no further development or production following.
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Armstrong Whitworth F.K.6
  • Role: Experimental Escort fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Armstrong Whitworth
  • Designed by: Frederick Koolhoven
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Project Terminated: 1916
  • Number Built: 2
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Rolls-Royce Eagle water-cooled V-12 engine, 250 hp (187 kW)
  • Wingspan: 62 ft in (18.90 m)
  • Length: 37 ft 0¾ in (11.30 m)
  • Height: 17 ft in (5.18 m)
  • Maximum Speed: 99 mph (160 km/h)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis guns, one in each nacelle

References

  1. Armstrong Whitworth F.K.6. (2010, September 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 17:11, October 30, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Armstrong_Whitworth_F.K.6&oldid=385009811
  2. Armstrong Whitworth F.K.6 1916 Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 17:11, October 30, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/arm_fk-6.php
  3. Koolhoven Aeroplanes Foundation http://www.koolhoven.com/history/airplanes/aw/
  4. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957.
  5. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume One Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1965.
  6. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York:Smithmark, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  7. Lewis, Peter. "The British Fighter since 1912". London:Putnam, Fourth edition, 1979. ISBN 0 370 10049 2.
  8. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7
  9. Tapper, Oliver. "Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft since 1914". London:Putnam, 1988. ISBN 0 85177 826 7.

Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10

Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10 - 1916
Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10

The Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10 was a two-seat quadruplane built for fighting and bombing. Like its predecessor, the F.K.9, it was a poor performer with serious design flaws. Of the fifty aircraft ordered by the Royal Naval Air Service, only eight were delivered.

Armstrong-Whitworth F.K.10
  • Type: Fighter/Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • First Introduced: 1916
  • Number Built: 8
  • Powerplant: Clerget 9B, 9 cylinder air cooled, 95kW
  • Wing Span: 8.48 m
  • Length: 6.78 m
  • Height: 3.5 m
  • Empty Weight: 560 kg
  • Loaded Weight: 916 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 153 km/h
  • Endurance: 2.5 hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm)Vickers machine guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Armstrong Whitworth F.K.10, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armstrong_Whitworth_F.K.10"
  2. Bruce, J.M. (1965). Warplanes of the First World War, Fighters Volume One, Great Britain. London: Macdonald.
  3. Green, W.; Swanborough, G. (1994). The Complete Book of Fighters. New York: Smithmark, p.25. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  4. Mason, Francis K (1992). The British Fighter since 1912. Annapolis, Ma: Naval Institute Press., p.11-14 ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Avro 523 Pike

Avro 523 - 1916
Avro 523 Pike - 1916

The Avro 523 Pike (the first Avro aircraft to receive a name) was a British multi-role combat aircraft of the First World War that did not progress past the prototype stage. It was intended to provide the Royal Naval Air Service with an anti-Zeppelin fighter that was also capable of long-range reconnaissance and light bombing.

The Avro Pike was a large, three-bay biplane of conventional layout driven by two pusher propellers. Three open cockpits were provided, the centre one for the pilot, and gunners fore and aft of him. The Admiralty evaluated the type, but rejected it. Avro then built a second prototype, changing the original's Sunbeam engines for Green E.6 engines instead and designating it the 523A.

The Admiralty evaluated this in November 1916, but found that the type was now obsolete and did not place an order. The two prototypes flew as testbeds with Avro for the remainder of the war.

Avro 523 Pike
  • Role: Multi-role military aircraft
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: A.V. Roe and Company
  • Designed by: Roy Chadwick
  • First flight: May 1916
  • Evaluation Test: November 1916
  • Primary user: Avro
  • Number built: 2
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 2 × Sunbeam Nubian, 160 hp (121 kW) each each
  • Wingspan: 60 ft in (18.30 m)
  • Wing area: 815 ft² (75.7 m²)
  • Length: 39 ft 1 in (11.92 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 8 in (3.56 m)
  • Empty weight: 4,000 lb (1,814 kg)
  • Gross weight: 6,064 lb (2,756 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 97 mph (156 km/h)
  • Endurance: 7 hours
  • Rate of climb: 526 ft/min (2.67 m/s)
  • Climb to: 5,000 ft (1,524 m) in 9 min 30 sec
  • Crew: three, pilot and two gunners
  • Armament:
    • 1 × flexible .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun in nose
    • 1 × flexible .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun in rear fuselage
    • 2 × 112 lb (51 kg) bombs carried in internal bay

References

  1. Avro Pike. (2010, November 10). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 04:46, November 27, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_Pike&oldid=395871349
  2. Jackson, A.J. Avro Aircraft since 1908. London: Putnam, 1990. ISBN 0-85177-834-8.
  3. Mason, Francis K. The British Bomber since 1912. London: Putnam, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions, 1989, p. 93.
  5. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing.

Avro 528

Avro 528 - 1916
Avro 528 - 1916

The Avro 528 was an unsuccessful large span single engined biplane built to an Admiralty contract in 1916. It carried a crew of two; only one was built.

Very little is known about the Avro 528 apart from a photograph and a general arrangement diagram. It was a two seat single engined biplane ordered by the Admiralty in 1915, and not even the task for which it was intended is recorded. It had some similarities with the Avro 519 (a single seater intended for the RFC) and the twin seat 519A, built for the RNAS, though neither of these were armed and both had 150 hp Sunbeam Nubian engines rather than the 225 hp Sunbeam of the 528. Both the 519s and the 528 had some shared features with the Naval Avro 504.
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Avro 528
  • Role: Two seat single engined biplane
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Avro
  • First flight: September 9, 1916
  • Retired: 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Sunbeam, 250 hp (187 kW)
  • Wingspan: 65 ft 0 in (19.82 m)
  • Length: 33 ft 8 in (10.26 m)
  • Gross weight: 5,509 lb (2,504 kg)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine gun in rear cockpit
    • provision for bombs in nacelles under lower wing

References

  1. Avro 528. (2010, May 20). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:39, December 9, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_528&oldid=363265695
  2. Jackson, A.J. (1965). Avro Aircraft since 1908, pp. 73-4, pp. 90-1. London:Putnam Publishing.
  3. Jackson, A.J. (1990). Avro Aircraft since 1908 (Second ed.), p. 150-151. London: Putnam. ISBN 0-85177-834-8.
  4. Mason, Francis K. (1994). The British Bomber since 1914, p. 70. London: Putnam. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.

Nieuport Triplane Nie-11C

Nieuport Triplane - 1916
Nieuport Triplane

The Nieuport Triplane was an experimental design built by the French and tested by the British Royal Flying Corps. As with many of the attempts to build successful triplanes by aircraft manufactures, the design was doomed to failure. The design was never adopted as a production aircraft because of the poor handling characteristics due to the aircraft's unusual wing configuration.

During 1915, designer Gustave Delage of the Société Anonyme des Établissements Nieuport had fitted a Nieuport 10 fuselage with tri-plane wings of unusual fore-and-aft geometry for experimental purposes, the arrangement being patented on 10 January 1916. It was test flown from a field next to the factory at Issy-les-Moulineaux, just a few miles from the famous Eiffel Tower. This was the first of the extraordinary Nieuport tri-planes
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Nieuport Triplane Nie-11C
  • Type: Experimental Triplane Fighter
  • National Origin: France
  • Designer: Gustave Delage
  • Manufacturer: Société Anonyme des Établissements Nieuport
  • First Flight: Late 1916
  • Retired: 1917
  • Primary User:
    • France: Section Technique de l'Aéronautique
    • Britian: Royal Flying Corps
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: Unknown
  • Airframes:
    • Nieuport Nie. X 2-seater
    • Nieuport Nie 17
  • Powerplant: 1× Le Rhône 9J rotary engine, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Length: 24 ft 0.5 in
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun mounted forward of the cockpit

Parnall Scout

Parnall Scout - 1916
Parnall Scout - 1916

Parnall and Sons of Bristol initiated work on the company's first original aircraft, a single-seat anti-airship fighter to the designs of A Camden Pratt, in 1916. Intended to meet a requirement formulated by the Admiralty, this aircraft, unofficially known as the Zeppelin Chaser, was a large, two-bay staggered biplane of wooden construction. It was powered by a 260hp (194 kW) Sunbeam Maori 12-cylinder water-cooled engine and armed with a single 0.303 in (7.7mm) gun offset to starboard and firing upward at an angle of 45°. Two prototypes were ordered, but the first of these proved appreciably overweight. Although the Scout reportedly flew twice, it was considered to possess unacceptably low safety factors and was returned to the manufacturer, development being abandoned.
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Parnall Scout
  • Type: Fighter
  • Country of Origin: Great Britian
  • Manufacturer: Parnall and Sons
  • Designer: A. Camden-Pratt
  • First flight: 1916
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: 2
  • Powerplant: 1 × Sunbeam Maori 12-cylinder water-cooled engine, 260 hp (194 kW)
  • Wingspan: 44 ft 0 in (13.41 m)
  • Wing Area: 516 ft² (47.94 m²)
  • Maximum speed: 113 mph (182 km/h)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm)Vickers machine gun offset to starboard and at an upward angle of 45°

References

  1. Parnall Scout. (2010, September 18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11:50, October 28, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Parnall_Scout&oldid=385560970
  2. Parnall Scout 1916 Retrieved 11:53, October 28, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/parnall_scout.php
  3. Parnall Scout Retrieved 11:56, October 28, 2010, fromhttp://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/11426865
  4. Parnall Scout (1916) (England) The-Blueprints.com Retrieved 19:56, October 08, 2010, from http://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww1planes/ww1-english/36141/view/parnall_scout__1916___england_/
  5. Green, William; Gordon Swanborough. The Complete Book of Fighters. Godalming, UK: Salamander Books. pp. 463.

Port Victoria P.V.2

Port Victoria PV.2 - 1916
Port Victoria P.V.2

The Port Victoria P.V.2 was a British prototype floatplane fighter of the First World War, designed and built at the Royal Naval Air Service's Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot on the Isle of Grain. Only a single aircraft was built, with the type not being chosen for production.

The Port Victoria Depot's second design, designated Port Victoria P.V.2 was a floatplane fighter intended to intercept German Zeppelins. The P.V.2 was a small single engined biplane, powered by a Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine driving a four blade propellor. It was of wood and fabric construction, and of sesquiplane configuration, i.e. with its lower wing much smaller than its upper wing (both of which used the high-lift wing sections pioneered by the P.V.1). Unusually, the aircraft's wing bracing struts also carried the aircraft's floats, forming a "W" shape when viewed from the front. The upper wing was attached directly to the top of the fuselage, giving a good field of fire for the intended armament of a single 2-lb Davis gun recoiless gun.
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Port Victoria P.V.2
  • Role: Floatplane Fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot
  • First Flight: 16 June 1916
  • Status: Prototype only
  • Number Bbuilt: 1
  • Powerplant: 1× Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 0 in (8.84 m)
  • Wing Area: 180 ft² (16.7 m²)
  • Length: 22 ft 0 in (6.71 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 4 in (2.85 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,211 lb (550 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,702 lb (774 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 81 knots (93 mph, 150 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Climb to 3,000 ft (915 m): 6 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis guns above upper wing.

References

  1. "Port Victoria P.V.2". (2010, September 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 23:34, November 8, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Port_Victoria_P.V.2&oldid=385055205
  2. "Port Victoria P.V.2 1916" Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 23:33, November 8, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/portvictoria_pv-2.php
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Tabloid,Schneider and Baby: Historic Military Aircraft No.17 Part IV". Flight, 29 November 1957. pp. 845—848.
  4. Collyer, David. "Babies Kittens and Griffons". Air Enthusiast, Number 43, 1991. Stamford, UK:Key Publishing. ISSN 0143 5450. pp. 50—55.
  5. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.

Sopwith L.R.T.Tr - 1916
Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.

The Sopwith Long Range Tractor Triplane (L.R.T.Tr) was a prototype British long-range three seat triplane escort fighter of the First World War. Of unusual layout, with a small gunner's nacelle mounted on the upper wing to give an all-round field of fire. Only a single example was built, other, smaller, fighters proving more practicable.
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Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.
  • Role: Escort fighter
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith
  • First flight: 1916
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Rolls-Royce Eagle water-cooled V12 engine, 250 hp (187 kW)
  • Wingspan: 52 ft 9 in (16.08 m)
  • Length: 35 ft 3 in (10.75 m)
  • Maximum speed: approx 107 mph (172 km/h)
  • Crew: 3 (pilot and two gunners)
  • Armament:
  • 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun in nacelle
  • 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun in rear cockpit

References

  1. Sopwith L.R.T.Tr.. (2010, September 22). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 19:22, November 28, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sopwith_L.R.T.Tr.&oldid=386348868
  2. Sopwith L.R.T.Tr. Virtual Aircraft Museum 1916 http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/sopwith_lrtt.php
  3. Sopwith LRTTr. (1916) (England) http://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww1planes/ww1-english/36180/view/sopwith_l_r_t_tr_(1916)_(england)/
  4. Bruce, J.M. British Aeroplanes 1914-18. London:Putnam, p.25, 1957.
  5. Bruce, J.M. War Planes of the First World War: Volume Two Fighters. London:Macdonald, 1968, pp. 139-142. ISBN 0 356 01473 8.
  6. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. The Complete Book of Fighters. New York:Smithmark, p.535, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  7. Lewis, Peter. The British Fighter since 1912. London:Putnam, Fourth edition, p.99, 1979. ISBN 0 370 10049 2.
  8. Mason, Francis K. The British Fighter since 1912. Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, p.67, pp.78-79, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7
  9. Gunston, Bill "Back to the Drawing Board: Aircraft That Flew But Never Took Off". First Edition edition (Jun 1996) Airlife Publishing Ltd; ISBN-10: 1853107581

Vickers E.S.1

Vickers E.S.1
Vickers E.S.1

The Vickers E.S.1 was an early British Fighter aircraft of the First World War. A single engined biplane, only three E.S.1s were built, although at least one was used by a home defence squadron of the Royal Flying Corps.

In late 1914, Harold Barnwell, chief test pilot with Vickers Limited, designed a single seat "scout" or fast reconnaissance aircraft, and had it built without the knowledge or approval of his employers, "borrowing" a Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine from Vickers' stores to power the aircraft. Barnwell attempted a first flight of his design, named the "Barnwell Bullet" in early 1915, but the aircraft crashed and was wrecked, possibly due to a miscalculated Center of gravity. Now aware of Barnwell's design, Vickers instructed their junior designer Rex Pierson to redesign the Bullet.

The redesigned aircraft, the Vickers E.S.1 (Experimental Scout), was a single-engined tractor biplane of fabric covered wooden construction. It had single-bay unstaggered wings with ailerons on both the upper and lower wings. Like the Barnwell Bullet, the E.S.1 was powered by a Monosoupape engine, closely cowled into a circular section fuselage. The pilot's cockpit was situated under the trailing edge of the upper wing, from which the view both downwards and upwards was poor.
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E.S.1 Mk II, Clerget engine
  • Type: Fighter aircraft
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed By: Rex Pierson
  • First Flight: August 1915
  • Operational Trials: 1916
  • Status: Prototype
  • Primary User: Royal Flying Corps
  • Number Built: 3
  • Powerplant: 1× Clerget 9-cylinder rotary engine, 110 hp (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 24 ft 5.5 in (7.46 m)
  • Wing Area: 215ft² (20.0 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 3 in (6.17 m)
  • Height: 8 ft (2.44 m)
  • Empty Weight: 981 lb (446 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,502 lb (683 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 112 mph (97 knots, 180 km/h) at sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 15,500 ft (4,730 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 1,000 ft/min (5.1 m/s)
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft (3,050 m) 18 min
  • Endurance: 2 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1× synchronised forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers E.S.1, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_E.S.1"
  2. Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, E.B. "Vickers Aircraft since 1908". London:Putnam, Second edition, 1988, p.60, p.74. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three, Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1969, pp. 86-89, p.91. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  4. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York, Smithmark, 1994, p. 576. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  5. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992, pp. 43-44. ISBN

Vickers F.B.11

Vickers F.B.11
Vickers F.B.11

The Vickers F.B.11 was a prototype British three-seat escort fighter of the First World War. A large single engined biplane, it carried one gunner in a nacelle mounted on the upper wing to give an all-round field of fire. Only a single example was completed.

In early 1916, the British War Office drew up a specification for a multi-seat escort fighter to be powered by one of the new Rolls-Royce Eagle engines, intended to protect formations of bombers from German fighters such as the Fokker E.I, with an additional role of destroying enemy airships. While the specification did not require high speed, a good field of fire for its guns was essential, while the secondary anti-Zeppelin role demanded an endurance of at least seven hours.
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Vickers F.B.11
  • Type: Escort fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed By: R.L Howard-Flanders
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1× Rolls-Royce Eagle III water-cooled V-12, 250 hp (187 kW)
  • Wingspan: 51 ft 0 in (15.55 m)
  • Wing Area: 845 ft² (78.5 m²)
  • Length: 43 ft 0 in (13.11 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 8 in (4.17 m)
  • Empty Weight: 3,340 lb (1,518 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 4,934 lb (2,243 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 96 mph (83 knots, 155 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,520 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 11,000 ft (3,350 m)
  • Endurance: 7.5 hours
  • Climb to: 5,000 ft (1,520 m) 16 min 30 s
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft (3,050 m) 55 min
  • Crew: 3 (pilot and two gunners)
  • Armament: 1× .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun in nacelle, 1× Lewis gun in rear gunners cockpit

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers F.B.11, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.11"
  2. Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, E.B. "Vickers Aircraft since 1908". London:Putnam, 1988, p.69. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957, p.25, p.572.
  4. Bruce, J.M. War "Planes of the First World War: Volume Three Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1969, p.100. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  5. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York:Smithmark, 1994, p.577-578. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  6. Lewis, Peter. "The British Fighter since 1912". London:Putnam, Fourth edition, 1979, p.99. ISBN 0 370 10049 2.
  7. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992, p.67. ISBN 1-55750-082-7

Vickers F.B.12

Vickers F.B.12
Vickers F.B.12

The slow, low flying and fragile Vickers F.B.12 marks the last gasp for British pusher-type fightercraft development. The introduction of the Sopwith Pup, and Triplane, which were both far superior aircraft in terms of handling characteristics, maximum speed, and operational celings killed chances for the F.B.12 before it could enter into production.

At the start of the First World War, Vickers entered into a partnership with the Hart Engine Company to develop a 150 hp (110 kW) nine-cyliner radial engine designed by Hart. This engine was planned to power a number of new designs by Vickers, the first of which was a small single-engine pusher biplane fighter, the F.B.12.
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Vickers F.B.12
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • First Flight: July 1916
  • Number Built: 22
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome Monosoupape nine-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft in (7.93 m)
  • Wing area: 204 ft² (19.0 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 6 in (6.55 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 8 in (2.64 m)
  • Empty weight: 845 lb (384 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,275 lb (580 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 86 mph (138 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Service ceiling: 11,500 ft (3,500 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 - 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers F.B.12, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.12"
  2. Bruce, J.M. (1969)." War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three Fighters". london: Macdonald. ISBN 356 01490 8. .
  3. Lamberton, W.M. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Herts: Harleyford Publications Ltd..
.

Vickers F.B.16

Vickers F.B.16
Vickers F.B.16

The F.B.16 was a single-bay staggered biplane with an elliptical cross section, designed by Rex K Pierson, to utilise the 150 hp Hart engine. The initial F.B.16 was completed and flown in the summer of 1916. The fuselage was fully faired out, and the Hart engine was partly cowled. Armament consisting of a single centrally-mounted synchronised 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun. During the course of testing, the part-cowling was removed from the engine to improve cooling. The decking aft of the cockpit was cut down and new vertical tail surfaces were fitted. With the suspension development of the Hart engine, the basic F.B.16 underwent a major redesign.

F.B.16A

The redesigned aircraft was designated the F.B.16A. It was powered with a 150 hp Hispano-Suiza water-cooled V-eight engine. This aircraft was destroyed in a crash on 20 December 1916, but a second identical aircraft was completed in the following month. The F.B.16A had flat fuselage sides and the single synchronised 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun was supplemented by a 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine gun mounted above the center section.
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Vickers F.B.16D
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed By: Rex K Pierson
  • First Flight: Summer of 1916
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant:
    • F.B.16: 1× Hart radial, 150 hp (110 kW)
    • F.B.16A: × Hispano-Suiza V-8 cylinder water-cooled engine, 150 hp (110 kW)
    • F.B.16D:1× Hispano-Suiza V-8 cylinder water-cooled engine, 200 hp (149 kW)
    • F.B.16E: Lorraine-Dietrich 8Bd V-8 cylinder water-cooled engine, 275 hp (205 kW)
  • Wingspan: 25 ft 0 in (7.62 m)
  • Wing Area: 206.99 ft² (19.23 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 6 in (5.94 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 9 in (2.67 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1376 lb (624 kg)
  • Take-off Weight: 1874 lb (850 kg)
  • Maximum Speed:
    • F.B.16D: 135 mph (217 km/h)
    • F.B.16E: (220km/h at 3050m)
  • Service Ceiling: 18500 ft (5640 m)
  • Climb To: (3050 m - 7.85 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • F.B.16A: 1 × forward firing, synchronised 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns, 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis
    • F.B.16D: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis firing through the hollow propeller shaft.
    • F.B.16E: 2 × forward firing, synchronised 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns

References

  1. Virtual Aircraft Museum Vickers F.B.16 http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/vickers_fb-16.php
  2. The Aerodrome Forum, F.B.16D: http://www.theaerodrome.com/forum/aircraft/14680-vickers-f-b-16d.html
  3. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three, Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1969. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.
  4. Bruce, J.M. "Fighters W.W.1" VOL. III
  5. Andrews, C.F. and Morgan, E.B. "Vickers Aircraft since 1908". London:Putnam, Second edition, 1988. ISBN 0 85177 815 1.

Wight Quadruplane

Wight Quadraplane
Wight Quadruplane

Confusingly, aircraft of original design produced by the J S White company bore the appellation Wight, to link them with the location of the works at Cowes on the Isle of Wight. The last of some eight types developed under the direction of Howard T Wright as chief designer was the only Wight aircraft in the fighter category.
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Wight Quadruplane
  • Type: Fighter
  • Status: Prototype
  • Manufacturer: J. S. White Company
  • Original Design: J. S. White Company
  • Redesigned by: Howard T. Wright
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Testing Period: 1916-1918
  • Development Canceled: 1918
  • Powerplant: 1 × Clerget 9Z nine-cylinder rotary engine 110hp (82 kw)
  • Wingspan: 19 ft 0 in (5.79 m)
  • Length: 21 ft 6 in (6.25 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 6 in (3.20 m)
  • Crew: One
  • Planned Armament: 2× fixed forward-firing synchronised 7.62mm Vickers guns.
  • Performance Data: Unavailable

References

  1. Wight Quadruplane: &http://wwi.priswell.com/british/wight/index.htm"
  2. Virtual Aircraft Museum: Wight Quadruplane "http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/wight_quadruplane.php"
  3. J. Samuel White & Co. "http://daveg4otu.tripod.com/iowweb/jsw.html"
  4. The-Blueprints.com, Wight Quadruplane (1916) (England)
  5. Wight Quadruplane "http://cs.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wight_Quadruplane" (Czechoslovakian)
  6. Francis K. Mason, "The British fighter since 1912": The Putnam Aviation Series Putnam Aeronautical Books, Naval Institute Press, 1992 ISBN 1557500827, 9781557500823
  7. J. M. Bruce, "British Fighters Of WW1" (Sopwith Hippo To Wight Quadruplane) (War Planes Of The First World War) (Hardcover), Macdonald (1969) ASIN: B002QB5HHW