British AviationBritish Roundel

Sopwith Snipe

Sopwith Snipe - 1918
Sopwith Snipe

A descendant of the Sopwith Camel, the Sopwith Snipe was equipped with a more powerful engine and provided better visibility from the cockpit. Though not much faster than the Camel, the Snipe had a better rate of climb and pilots found it much easier to fly.

On 27 October 1918, Canadian ace William Barker made the Sopwith Snipe famous in a single-handed battle with more than 60 enemy aircraft that earned him the Victoria Cross. Flying the Sopwith Snipe, Captain Elwyn King scored 7 victories making him the highest scoring ace to fly this aircraft.

Sopwith Snipe
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • Type: Fighter
  • First Introduced: 1918
  • Number Built: 497
  • Powerplant: Bentley B.R.2, air cooled rotary, 230 hp
  • Wing Span: 31 ft 1 in (9.47 m)
  • Length: 19 ft 2 in (5.84 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 6 in (2.90 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,305 lb (590 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,105 lb (955 kg)
  • Max Speed: 121 mph (195 km/h) - 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,100 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hrs
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns
    • × 25 lb (11 kg) bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Sopwith Snipe, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Snipe"
  2. Franks, Norman. "Dolphin and Snipe Aces of World War I (Aircraft of the Aces)". London: Osprey Publishing, 2002. ISBN 1-84176-317-9.

Sopwith Buffalo

Sopwith Buffalo
Sopwith Buffalo

The Sopwith Buffalo was a British armored fighter/reconnaissance aircraft of the First World War. A single-engined biplane, two examples of the Buffalo were built by Sopwith to carry out reconnaissance missions low over the trenches while protected against machine-gun fire from the ground, but no production followed, with the end of the war removing the need for such an aircraft.

In July 1918, the British Air Ministry requested Sopwith, who was already building the Sopwith Salamander armored single-seat ground attack fighter, to build an armored two-seat aircraft to carry out the dangerous contact patrol mission. This mission involved flying at low altitude over the battlefield to locate and keep in contact with attacking forces, therefore keeping commanders in touch with the progress of the battle. This exposed aircraft carrying out such missions to heavy small arms fire from enemy trenches, resulting in heavy casualties.
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Sopwith Buffalo
  • Role: Armored fighter/reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • First flight: September 19, 1918
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 2
  • Developed from: Sopwith Bulldog
  • Powerplant: 1× Bentley BR.2 rotary engine, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • Wingspan: 36 ft 6 in (10.52 m)
  • Wing area: 326 sq ft (30.3 m²)
  • Length: 23 ft 3½in (7.10 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 6 in (2.90 m)
  • Empty weight: 2,178 lb (990 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 3,071 lb (1,396 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 114 mph (99 knots, 184 km/h) at 1,000 ft (300 m)
  • Service ceiling: 9,000 ft (2,700 m)
  • Climb to 3,000 ft (900 m): 4 min 55 sec
  • Range: 275 mi (239 nmi, 443 km/h)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Gun - Pilot: 1× forward firing .303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun
    • Gun - Observer: 1× flexibly mounted Lewis gun in rear cockpit

References

  1. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957.
  2. Bruce, J.M. "The First British armoured Brigade",Part 3. Air International, April 1979, Vol 16 No. 4. Bromley, UK:Fine Scroll Publishing. pp. 182-190, 199-200.
  3. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  4. "Milestones:The Sopwith Machines". Flight, 6 February 1919. pp. 163-174.
  5. Robertson, Bruce. "Sopwith–The Man and his Aircraft". Letchworth, UK:Air Review, 1970. ISBN 0 900 435 15 1

French AviationFrench Roundel

Morane-Saulnier Type AI

Morane-Saulnier Type AI - 1917
Morane-Saulnier Type AI

The Morane-Saulnier Type AI was a French parasol-wing fighter aircraft produced by Morane-Saulnier during World War I, to replace the obsolete Morane-Saulnier Type N. Its engine was mounted in a circular open-front cowling. The parasol wing was swept back. The spars and ribs of the circular section fuselage were wood, wire-braced and covered in fabric. The production aircraft were given service designations based on whether they had 1 gun (designated MoS 27) or 2 guns (designated MoS 29).
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Morane-Saulnier AI
  • Type: fighter/trainer
  • Country: France
  • Manufacturer: Morane-Saulnier
  • First Flight: August 1917
  • Primary User: French Air Force
  • Number Built: 1210
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome Monosoupape 9Nb, 9-cylinder rotary 150 hp (112 kW)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 11 in (8.51 m)
  • Length: 18 ft 6.2 in (5.65 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 10.5 in (2.40 m)
  • Empty Weight: 912 lb (414 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 1,486 lb (674 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 137 mph (221 km/h)
  • Endurance: 1 hours 45 min
  • Service Ceiling: 7000 m (22,965 ft)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 or 2 ×0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun foward of cockpit

References

  1. Donald, David, ed (1997)."The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft". Prospero Books. pp. pg 659. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.
  2. Holmes, Tony (2005). "Jane's Vintage Aircraft Recognition Guide". London: Harper Collins. pp. 36. ISBN 0 0071 9292 4.
  3. Lamberton, W.M. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Herts: Harleyford Publications Ltd.. pp. 84-85.

Salmson 2

Salmson 2a
Salmson 2

Built in large numbers, the Salmson 2 was the most widely used reconnaissance aircraft in the final year of the war. A versatile two-seater biplane featuring a new Canton-Unné radial engine, it was also employed as a daylight bomber and ground attack aircraft by French and American air services.

Salmson 2
  • Country: France
  • Manufacturer: Société des Moteurs Salmson
  • Type: Reconnaissance
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Number Built: 3,200
  • Powerplant: Canton-Unné, 9 cylinder, radial, 260 hp (194 kW)
  • Wing Span: 38 ft 8.5 in (11.8 m)
  • Length: 27 ft 10.75 in (8.5 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 6.25 in (2.9 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,676 lbs (760 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,954 lb (1,340 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 115 mph (185 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 20,505 ft (6,250 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 2-3 machine guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Salmson 2, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmson_2"
  2. Davilla, James J., & Soltan, Arthur M., "French Aircraft of the First World War". Stratford, Connecticut: Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0

Italian AviationItalian Rondel

Pomilio Gamma

Pomilio Gamma
Pomilio Gamma

The Pomilio Gamma was an Italian fighter prototype of 1918.

The Pomilio company of Turin designed and manufactured the Gamma, a wooden, single-seat, single-bay biplane with wings of unequal span, the upper wing being of greater span than the lower. It was powered by a 149-kilowatt (200-horsepower) SPA 6A water-cooled engine driving a two-bladed tractor propeller. It had fixed, tail skid landing gear.
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Pomilio Gamma
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Pomilio
  • First Flight: 1918
  • Number Built: 2
  • Powerplant: 1 × Isotta-Fraschini V6 piston, 250 hp (186 kW)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft 2½ in (7.99 m)
  • Wing area: 235.74 ft² (21.90 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 8 in (6.30 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,499 lb (680 kg)
  • Loaded Weight 2,094 lb (950 kg)
  • Time To: 9,842 ft (3,000 m) 7 min 30 sec
  • Maximum Speed: 140 mph (225 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: Unknown

References

  1. From Wikipedia Pomilio Gamma, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomilio_Gamma"
  2. Green, William, and Gordon Swanborough. "The Complete Book of Fighters: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Every Fighter Aircraft Built and Flown". New York: SMITHMARK Publishers, 1994, pp. 478-479. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.

Pomilio PE

Pomilio PE
Pomilio PE

Manufactured in Italy and the United States, the Pomilio PE was effectively used by thirty squadrons for reconnaissance and artillery spotting. Like its predecessors, the PC and PD, the PE two-seater biplane had a wood and metal airframe but featured a redesigned tail with larger tailplanes. Built in large numbers, it was very fast, maneuverable and had an excellent rate of climb.

Pomilio PE
  • Manufacturer: Fabbrica Aeroplani Ing. O. Pomilio & Compagnia
  • Type: Reconnaissance
  • Number Built: 1,616
  • Engines:
    • Italy: Fiat A12, 260 hp
    • USA: Liberty, 400 hp
  • Wing Span: 38 ft 8.5 in 11.78 m
  • Length: 29 ft 4 in 8.94 m
  • Height: 11 ft 3.35 m
  • Loaded Weight: 3,391 lb 1,538 kg
  • Max Speed: 120 mph 194 km/h
  • Ceiling: 16,405 ft 5000 m
  • Endurance: 3.5 hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 2 machine guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Pomilio PE, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomilio_PE"
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions.
  3. "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft" (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing. pp. 2759.

United States AviationAmerican Roundel

Loening M-8

Loening M-8 - 1918
Loening M-8

The Leoning M-8 was a 1910s American fighter monoplane designed by Grover Loening and built by his Loening Aeronautical Engineering Company. An order of 5000 for the United States Army Air Corps was canceled when the First World War ended.

The first design by Grover Loening after he had formed his company was a two-seat braced-wing monoplane fighter the M-8. It had a fixed tailskid landing gear and was powered by a nose-mounted Hispano-Suiza engine with a tractor propeller. The pilot and gunner had tandem open cockpits.

The first aircraft was flown in 1918 and after testing the United States Army Air Corps ordered 5000 aircraft to be built. Only two aircraft were delivered to the Army and one to the United States Navy with the designation M-8-0.

At the end of the war the order was canceled. The Navy ordered 46 aircraft in two variants for use as observation aircraft. The Navy also ordered six M-8-S twin-float seaplane versions. A single-seat version was developed for the Army as the Loening PW-2.

Loening M-8-0
  • Role: Monoplane fighter
  • Manufacturer: Loening Aeronautical Engineering
  • National Origin: United States
  • Designed by: Grover Loening
  • First flight: 1918
  • Primary users:
    • United States Navy
    • United States Army Air Corps
  • Number built: 55
    • Variants:
    • M-8 Production variant for the United States Army Air Corps, two prototypes, 5000 cancelled.
    • M-8-0 One M-8 for evaluation by the United States Navy.
    • M-8-0 Production version for the United States Navy, 10 built.
    • M-8-1 Second production variant for the United States Navy, 36 built by the Naval Aircraft Factory.
    • M-8-S Seaplane variant for the United States Navy, six built.
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hispano-Suiza V-8 engine, 300 hp (224 kW)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 0 in (10.67 m)
  • Length: 21 ft 6 in (6.55 m)
  • Gross weight: 2068 lb (938 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 145 mph (233 km/h)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: Twin 0.3in (7.62mm) Lewis machine guns

References

  1. Loening M-8. (2011, January 17). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:16, January 18, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Loening_M-8&oldid=408358502
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions.
  3. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing. pp. 2376.

Packard-Le Peré LUSAC-11

Packard-Le Peré LUSAC-11 - 1918
Packard-Le Peré LUSAC-11

The LUSAC-11 (Le Peré United States Army Combat) was an early American Army two-seat fighter aircraft. It was designed during World War I and ordered in large numbers, but the contract was cancelled at the end of the war, and only 30 were built. The type was used for experimental purposes, setting several altitude records during the 1920s.

When the U.S. entered World War I, the Signal Corps had just 55 aircraft, none fit for combat. The American Expeditionary Force was equipped with French types, and the LUSAC was part of a plan to build French designs in the U.S.

Georges Le Peré, a member of the French Aeronautical Mission to the United States, was tasked by the Engineering Division of the United States Army Air Service to design a two-seat escort fighter. His design was a two-bay biplane with upper and lower wings of equal span with forward stagger. It was of wood and fabric construction, with the fuselage consisting of a wooden box girder with plywood covering. It was powered by a 425 hp (317 kW) Liberty L-12 engine cooled by a radiator faired into the upper wing. Armament was two .30 inch (7.62 mm) machine guns synchronized to fire through the propeller, with two Lewis guns flexibly mounted on a Scarff ring at the observer's cockpit.
[Read more]

Packard-Le Peré LUSAC-11
  • Role: Fighter aircraft
  • National origin: United States of America
  • Manufacturer: Engineering Division/Packard
  • Designed by: Georges Lep�re
  • First flight: 15 May 1918
  • Primary user: United States Army Air Service
  • Number built: 30
  • Developed into: Waterman 3-L-400
  • Powerplant: 1 × Liberty L-12 liquid-cooled V12 engine, 425 hp (317 kW)
  • Wingspan: 41 ft 7 in (12.67 m)
  • Wing area: 415.6 ft² (68.60 m²)
  • Length: 25 ft 3 in (7.69 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 7 in (3.22 m)
  • Empty weight: 2,561 lb (1,162 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 3,745 lb (1,669 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 133 mph (116 knots, 214 km/h) at sea level
  • Cruise speed: 118 mph
  • Range: 320 mi (278 nmi, 515 km)
  • Service ceiling: 20,200 ft (6,157 m)
  • Climb to 6,500 ft (1,980 m): 6 min
  • Crew: 2 (pilot and observer/gunner)
  • Armament:
  • Guns:
  • Pilot: 2 × 0.30 in (7.62mm) Marlin machine guns on the upper fuselage
  • Observer: 2 × 0.30 in (7.62mm) Lewis guns in the observer's cockpit

References

  1. "Packard-Le Peré LUSAC-11". (2010, December 12). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 23:54, January 15, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Packard-Le_Per%C3%A9_LUSAC-11&oldid=401930379
  2. "Factsheets: Packard-Le Peré LUSAC 11". National Museum of the US Air Force. Retrieved 5 December 2010 from http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=325
  3. "The Royal Aero Club of the U.K.: Official Notices to Members". Flight 16 December 1920. Retrieved 23:57, January 15, 2011, http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1920/1920%20-%200265.html
  4. Packard-Le Peré LUSAC-11 The-Blueprints.com Retrieved from http://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww1planes/ww1-usa/31365/view/le_pere_lusac_11/
  5. Angelucci, Enzo and Peter M. Bowers. The American Fighter. Sparkford, UK: Haynes Publishing Group, 1987, p. 195. ISBN 0-85429-635-2.
  6. "Eighteen Years of World's Records". Flight, 7 February 1924, pp. 73-75.
  7. Fitzsimons, Bernard, ed. "LUSAC-11, Packard-Le Peré". Illustrated Encyclopedia of 20th Century Weapons and Warfare. Volume 16, p.1782-3. London: Phoebus, 1978.
  8. Owers, Colin."Stop-Gap Fighter:The LUSAC Series". Air Enthusiast, Fifty, May to July 1993. pp. 49-51. Stamford, UK:Key Publishing. ISSN 0143-5450.

Austrian AviationAustrian Cross

Phöenix C.I

Phöenix C-1 - 1918
Phöenix C.I

The Phöenix C.I was an Austro-Hungarian First World War reconnaissance and general-purpose Biplane built by the Phöenix Flugzeug-Werke.

The Phöenix C.I was the first original design developed by the Phöenix Flugzeug-Werke It was based on the Hansa-Brandenburg C.II that Phöenix were building under licence. A conventional biplane with a rear fuselage/tailplane similar to aircraft designed by Ernst Heinkel. The C.I had a fixed trailskid landing gear and was powered by a Hiero 6-cylinder inline piston engine, it had two tandem open cockpits for the pilot and observer/gunner. The company built 110 C.Is and then entered service with the KuKLFT in early 1918. After the First World War 30 aircraft were built by the Swedish Army engineering department but they were fitted with a 220 hp (164 kW) Benz inline engine.

Phöenix C.I
  • Role: Reconnaissance and General-Purpose Biplane
  • National origin: Austria-Hungary
  • Manufacturer: Phöenix Flugzeug-Werke
  • Introduced: 1918
  • Retired: 1920s
  • Primary User: KuKLFT
  • Number Built: 140
  • Length: 24 ft 8 in (7.52 m)
  • Wingspan: 36 ft 1 in (11.00 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 8¼ in (2.95 m)
  • Gross Weight: 2436 lb (1105 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hiero 6-cylinder inline piston, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • Maximum Speed: 112 mph (180 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours 50 min
  • Service Ceiling: 17715 ft (5400 m)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 2 × 8 mm Schwarzlose machine guns (one synchronised forward-firing and one on a mount in rear cockpit)

References

  1. Phöenix C.I. (2010, September 19). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 13:40, March 25, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ph%C3%B6nix_C.I&oldid=385776342
  2. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.

Phöenix D.III

Phöenix D-III - 1918
Phöenix D-III

The Phöenix D.I was an Austro-Hungarian First World War biplane fighter built by the Phöenix Flugzeug-Werke and based on the Phöenix D-II

The Phöenix D.III was the third design developed by the Phöenix Flugzeug-Werke based on Hansa-Brandenburg designs which it has produced under licence. The D.III was a single-seat biplane fighter with improvements over the original Hansa-Brandenburg design which included more efficient wings, a more powerful 230hp (172kW) Hiero in-line engine. The Phöenix D.III kept the structural improvements,and balanced elevators and balanced ailerons on the upper wings, used in the D.II. The last of 158 aircraft of all three types was delivered on 4 November 1918.

PhÖenix D.I
  • Type: Biplane fighter
  • National Origin: Austria-Hungary
  • Manufacturer : Phöenix Flugzeug-Werke
  • First Flight: 19187
  • Primary user: KuKLFT
  • Number Built: 158
  • Powerplant:8 1 × Hiero 6-cylinder inline piston, 230hp (172kW)
  • Wingspan: 31 ft 11¾ in (9.75 m)
  • Length: 21 ft 9¾ in (6.65 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 2¼ in (2.80 m)
  • Gross Weight: 1775 lb (805 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 112 mph (180 km/h)
  • Endurance: 2 hours
  • Service ceiling: 19,685 ft (6000 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × Synchronised fixed forward-firing 0.315 in (8 mm) Schwarzlose machine guns

References

  1. Phöenix D.I. (2010, February 13). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:22, July 2, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ph%C3%B6nix_D.I&oldid=343856688
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions.
  3. "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft" (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.
  4. Lamberton, W.M. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Herts: Harleyford Publications Ltd.. pp. 22-23.

German AviationGerman Cross

Fokker D.VII

Fokker D.VII - 1918
Fokker D.VII

The Fokker D.VII is widely regarded as the best German aircraft of the war. Its development was championed by Manfred von Richthofen. In January 1918, Richthofen tested the D.VII in the trials at Adlershof but never had an opportunity to fly it in combat. He was killed just days before it entered service. When introduced, the D.VII was not without problems. On occasion its wing ribs would fracture in a dive or high temperatures would cause the gas tank to explode. Even so, the D.VII proved to be durable and easy to fly. As noted by one authority, it had “an apparant ability to to make a good pilot out of mediocre material.” When equipped with the BMW engine, the D.VII could outclimb any Allied opponent it encountered in combat. Highly maneuverable at all speeds and altitudes, it proved to be more than a match for any of the British or French fighter planes of 1918.

Fokker D.VII
  • Manufacturer: Fokker Flugzeug-Werke GmbH
  • Type: Fighter
  • First Introduced: End of April, 1918
  • Number Built: 840
  • Engines:
    • Mercedes D-III 6 cylinder in-line, 160 hp. (120 kW)
    • BMW IIIa in-line, 185 hp
  • Wing Span: 29 ft 3 in (8.93 m)
  • Length: 22 ft 9 in (6.93 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 2 in (2.80 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,540 lb (698 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,874 lb (850 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 116 mph (186 km/h) - Mercedes 124 mph - BMW
  • Service Ceiling: 19,600 ft (5,970 m) Mercedes 21,000 ft BMW
  • Endurance: 1.5 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × Spandau 7.92 mm machine guns

Fokker E.V - D.VIII

Fokker E.V - D.VII - 1918I
Fokker E.V - D.VIII

Winner of the April 1918 fighter competition, the Fokker D.VIII monoplane was delayed by production problems. Only thirty six of them entered service during the last weeks of the war. Equipped with an underpowered engine, the D.VIII was nevertheless an excellent fighter eagerly received by the German air service. Dubbed the “Flying Razor” by Allied pilots, it had the distinction of scoring the last aerial victory of the war.

Fokker E.V - D.VIII
  • Manufacturer: Fokker Flugzeug-Werke GmbH
  • Type: Fighter
  • First Introduced: 1918
  • Number Built: About 290
  • Engine: Oberursel UR-II, 9 cylinder rotary, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wing Span: 27 ft 6.75 in (8.40 m)
  • Length: 19 ft 4 in (5.86 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 3 in (2.82 m)
  • Empty Weight: 384 kg (848 lb)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,238 lb
  • Maximum Speed: 127 mph (204 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 20,670 ft (6,300 m)
  • Endurance: 1.5 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: × Spandau 7.92 mm machine guns

Junkers D.I

 Junkers D.I - 1918
Junkers D.I

What really set the Junker D.I apart from any previous aircraft was it's cantilevered low-wing design and corrugated duralumin skin. Duralumin, the same metal used for Zeppelin construction, was light yet strong. The Junkers monoplane was rugid, fast, and agile. The D.I was every fighter pilots' dream. The design was a decade ahead of its time appearing a year too late.

Junkers D.I
  • Manufacturer: Junkers-Fokker Flugzeugwerke AG.
  • Type: Fighter
  • First Introduced: 1918
  • Powerplant: BMW IIIa, 6 cylinder, in-line, 185 hp. (138 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 6.3 in (9.00 m
  • Length: 23 ft 9.4 in (7.25 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 6 in (2.60 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,438 lb (654 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,834 lb (834 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 140 mph (225 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 19,700 ft (6,000 m)
  • Endurance: 1.5 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: × Spandau 7.92 mm machine guns

Pfalz D.XII

Pfalz D.XII
Pfalz D.XII

The Pfalz D.XII was the successor to the Pfalz D.IIIa series fighter. They were received into service in late summer of 1918. It was a sturdy, agile, and well designed fighter that nearly rivaled the famed Fokker D.VII in performance. Though the D.XII was an effective fighter aircraft, it was overshadowed by the highly successful Fokker D.VII. It was not produced in great numbers due to the amount of time needed to form the plywood fuselage.

Pfalz D.XII
  • Manufacturer: Pfalz Flugzeug-Werke GmbH
  • Type: Fighter
  • First Introduced: 1918
  • Number Built: 800
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.IIIa 180 hp. (134 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 6 in (9 m)
  • Length: 21 ft (6.35 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 10 in (2.70 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,746 lb (792 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,989 lb (902 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 106 mph (170 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 18,500 ft (5,640 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × 7.92 mm LMG 08/15 Spandau machine guns

Roland D.VI

LFG Roland D.VIa - 1918
LFG Roland D.VIa - 1918

Roland D.VIa aircraft were received in the late Spring of 1918 and were still in use at the end of hostilities in November . The Roland D.VI was purported to have good handling qualities, but most pilots wanted the sensational Fokker D.VII. The clinker built body of the Roland D.VI was final refinement of all the shark-like designs that had come before it.

Roland D.VI
  • Manufacturer: Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft (L.F.G.)
  • Type: Fighter
  • First Introduced: 1918
  • Number Built: About 150
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.IIIa,6 cylinder in-line, 180 hp. (134 kW)
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 10.77 in (9.42 m)
  • Length: 20 ft 8.77 in (6.32 m)
  • Height: 2.80 m (9 ft 2.25 in)
  • Empty Weight: 656 kg (1,446 lb)
  • Loaded Weight: 846 kg (1,865 lb)
  • Maximum Speed: 108 knots, 124 mph (199 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 19,000 ft (5,790 m)
  • Endurance: 2 hr
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2× 7.92 mm LMG08/15 machine guns

Siemens-Schuckert D.IV

Siemens-Schuckert D.IV - 1918
Siemens-Schuckert D.IV - 1918

Modified wing construction and an improved rotary engine made the Siemens-Schuckert D.IV a better aircraft than its predecessor the D.III. Considered superior to the Fokker D.VII, it entered service in small numbers, too late to have much of an impact on the outcome of the air war.

The planes started reaching operational units in August, but of the 280 ordered only 123 were completed by the end of the war, about half of those reaching operational units. In October 1918 it was officially described as superior by far to all single-seaters in use.

Siemens-Schuckert D.IV
  • Manufacturer: Siemens-Schuckert Werke
  • Type: Fighter
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Number Built: 123
  • Powerplant: Siemens-Halske Sh.III, 11 cylinder rotary, 160hp. (120 kW)
  • Length: 18.70ft (5.70m)
  • Wiing Span: 27.40ft (8.35m)
  • Height: 8.92ft (2.72m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,190lbs (540kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,620lbs (735kg)
  • Max Speed: 118mph (190kmh)
  • Service Ceiling: 26,000 ft in 20 mins
  • Service Ceiling: 26,247ft (8,000m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2× 7.92mm LMG 08/15 machine guns