Bristol F.2 Fighter

Bristol Fighter  F.2b - 1917
Bristol F.2 Fighter

The versatile Bristol Fighter was a maneuverable, heavily armed two-seater biplane designed by Frank S. Barnwell. One of the most successful fighters of the war, it got off to a poor start during "Bloody April" when it was introduced to the Western Front by the inexperienced pilots and observers of 48 Squadron.

The Bristol Fighter was a rugged and dangerous adversery for any German plane that came in contact with it. Some were fitted with twin 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns on a swivel mount, as well as a well protected 0.303 in (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers machine gun. This plane's career lasted many years after the conclusion of world war.
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Bristol F.2 Fighter
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: British & Colonial Aeroplane Co. Ltd.
  • Entered Service: Early 1917
  • Powerplant: Rolls-Royce Falcon-III, water cooled in-line 275 hp. (205 kW)
  • Wingspan: 39 ft 3 in (11.96 m)
  • Length: 25 ft 10 in (7.87 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 9 in (2.97 m)
  • Empty Weight: 2,145 lb (975 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,243 lb (1,474 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 123 mph (107 kn, 198 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,500 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 18,000 ft (5,500 m)
  • Range: 369 mi (593 km)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers machine gun in the upper fuselage
    • 1 or 2× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns in the observer's cockpit
    • Bombs: 240 lb (110 kg)

References

  1. From Wikipedia Bristol F.2 Fighter, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_F.2_Fighter"
  2. Barnes, C.H. "Bristol Aircraft since 1910". London: Putnam, 1964.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The Bristol Fighter". Flight, 7 November 1952, pp. 587-591.
  4. Bruce, J.M. "Warplanes of the First World War, Vol. 1". London: Macdonald, 1965.
  5. Cheesman, E.F., ed. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Letchworth, Harleyford, UK: Aero Publishers, Inc., 1960.
  6. Gutman, J. "Bristol F2 Fighter Aces of World War 1". London: Osprey Publishing, 2007. ISBN 978-1-84603-201-1.
  7. Kopan'ski, Tomasz Jan. "Samoloty Brytyjskie w Lotnictwie Polskim 1918-1930" (British Aircraft in the Polish Air Force 1918-1930) (in Polish). Bellona, Warsaw: 2001. ISBN 83-11-09315-6.

Airco D.H.4

Airco D.H.4 - 1917
Airco D.H.4

Designed in 1916 by Geoffrey de Havilland, the D.H.4 was the only British design manufactured by the Americans. It was easily identified by its rectangular fuselage and deep frontal radiator. Versatile, heavily armed and equipped with a powerful twelve cylinder engine, this biplane daylight bomber was fast.

Sometimes called the "Flaming Coffin," its huge fuel tank was dangerously positioned between the pilot and observer, hindering communication. Produced in vast numbers, 6295, of which 4846 were built in the United States, many D.H.4s were modified for civilian air service after the war.
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Airco D.H.4
  • Type:Reconaissance/Tactical Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Aircraft Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
  • Entered Service: March 1917
  • Number Built: 6,295
  • Engine(s):
    • Rolls-Royce Eagle VII, water cooled 12 cylinder, 375 hp
    • Liberty 12, water cooled 12 cylinder, 395 to 421 hp (USA)
    • Wing Span: 42 ft 4.5 in 12.92 m
  • Length: 30 ft 8 in (9.35 m)
  • Height: 11 ft (3.35 m)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,472 lb (1,575 kg)
  • Speed: 143 mph {230 km/h) sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 23,500 ft (7,163 m)
  • Endurance: 6 hr 45 min
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2-4 machine guns
    • Bombs: 460 lb (208.7 kg) of bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Airco DH.4, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airco_DH.4"
  2. Angelucci, Enzo, (editor). "World Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft". London: Jane's, 1991. ISBN 0-7106-0148-4.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The De Havilland D.H.4." Flight, 17 October 1952, pp. 506-510.
  4. Bowers, Peter M. "Boeing Aircraft since 1916. London: Putnam, Second edition, 1989. ISBN 0-85177-804-6.
  5. Jackson, A.J. British "Civil Aircraft since 1919: Volume 2". London:Putnam, Second edition, 1973. ISBN 0-370-10010-7.
  6. Jackson, A.J. "De Havilland Aircraft since 1909". London: Putnam, Third edition, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-802-X.
  7. Mason, Francis K. "The British Bomber since 1914". London: Putnam Aeronautical Books, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.
  8. Maurer, Maurer (editor). "The U.S. Air Service in World War I: Volume IV" Postwar Review. Washington, DC: The Office of Air Force History Headquarters USAF, 1979.
  9. Sturtivant, Ray and Gordon Page. "The D.H.4/D.H.9 File". Tunbridge Wells, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd., 2000. ISBN 0-85130-274-2.
  10. Swanborough, F.G. and Peter M. Bowers." United States Military Aircraft since 1909". London: Putnam, 1963.
  11. Swanborough Gordon and Peter M. Bowers. "United States Naval Aircraft since 1911". London: Putnam, Second edition, 1976. ISBN 0-370-10054-9.
  12. Thetford, Owen. "British Naval Aircraft since 1912". London: Putnam, Fourth edition, 1978. ISBN 0-370-30021-1.
  13. "United States Air Force Museum. Wright-Patterson AFB", Ohio: Air Force Museum Foundation, 1975.
  14. Williams, George K. "Biplanes and Bombsights: British Bombing in World War I". Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Air University Press, 1999. ISBN 1-41020-012-4.

Airco DH.9

Airco D.H.9 - 1917
Airco DH.9

The Airco DH.9 (from de Havilland 9) - also known after 1920 as the de Havilland DH.9 - was a British bomber used in the First World War. A single-engined biplane, it was a development of Airco's earlier, highly successful DH.4 and was ordered in very large numbers for Britain's Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force.

Its engine was unreliable, and failed to provide the expected power, giving the DH.9 poorer performance than the aircraft it was meant to replace, and resulting in heavy losses, particularly over the Western Front. The subsequently-developed DH.9A had a more powerful and reliable American Liberty L-12 engine.

The DH.9 was designed by de Havilland for the Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 1916 as a successor to the DH.4. It used the wings and tail unit of the DH.4 but had a new fuselage. This enabled the pilot to sit closer to the gunner/observer and away from the engine and fuel tank. The other major change from the DH.4 was the choice of the promising new BHP/Galloway Adriatic engine, which was predicted to produce 300 hp (224 kW) and so give the new aircraft an adequate performance to match enemy fighters.
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Airco D.H.9
  • Type: Reconaissance/Tactical Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Airco
  • Designed by: Geoffrey de Havilland
  • First flight: July 1917
  • Introduced: 1917
  • Retired: 1920
  • Primary users: Royal Air Force, RNAS, RFC.
  • Number Built: 4091
  • Variants: DH.9A, DH.9C, Westland Walrus
  • Length: 30 ft 5 in (9.27 m)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft 4½ in (19.92 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 3½ in (3.44 m)
  • Wing area: 434 ft² (40.3 m²)
  • Empty weight: 2,360 lb (1,014 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 3,790 lb (1,723 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Armstrong Siddeley Puma piston engine, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • Maximum speed: 98 kn (113 mph, 182 km/h)
  • Endurance: 4½ hours
  • Service ceiling: 15,500 ft (4,730 m)
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft 18 min 30 sec
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns:
    • 1 × Forward firing Vickers machine gun
    • 1 or 2 × Rear Lewis guns on scarff ring
    • Bombs: Up to 460 lb (209 kg) bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Airco DH.9, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airco_DH.9"
  2. Barnes, C.H. "Handley Page Aircraft since 1907". London:Putnam, 1976. ISBN 0 370 00030 7.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The De Havilland D.H.9 Historic Military Aircraft No. 12, Part I". Flight, 6 April 1956. Pages 385-388, 392.
  4. Bruce, J.M. "The De Havilland D.H.9 Historic Military Aircraft No. 12, Part II". Flight, 13 April 1956. Pages 422-426.
  5. Gerdessen, F. "Estonian Air Power 1918 - 1945". Air Enthusiast No 18, April - July 1982. Pages 61-76. ISSN 0143-5450.
  6. Jackson, A.J. "British Civil Aircraft since 1919 Volume 2". London:Putnam, Second edition 1973. ISBN 0 370 10010 7.
  7. Jackson, A.J. "De Havilland Aircraft since 1909". London Putnam, Third edition 1987. ISBN 0 85177 802 X.
  8. Mason, Francis K. "The British Bomber Since 1914". London Putnam Aeronautical Books, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.
  9. Winchester, Jim, ed. "Bombers of the 20th Century". London Airlife Publishing Ltd., 2003. ISBN 1-84037-386-5.