Airco D.H.5

Airco D.H.5
Airco D.H.5

Unlike other biplane fighters of its day, the Airco D.H.5 featured an unusual wing configuration. By positioning the upper wing toward the rear of the cockpit, designer Geoffrey de Havilland was able to improve the pilot's field of vision. Despite this improvement, at high altitude the D.H.5 was a poor performer due to its underpowered engine. By the end of 1917, it was removed from combat and used as a trainer.

Airco D.H.5
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Aircraft Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
  • Entered Service: May 1917
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône, Reciprocating air cooled rotary, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wing Span: 25 ft 8 in (7.82 m)
  • Length: 22 ft 9 in (6.94 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 1 in (2.77 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,010 lb (458 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,492 lb (677 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 102 mph/10,000 ft (164 km/h at 3,000 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 16,000 ft (4,877 m)
  • Endurance: 2 hr 45 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Airco DH-5, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airco_DH.5"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "Warplanes of the First World War Vol. 1". London: MacDonald, 1965, p. 128-132.
  3. Jackson, A.J. "De Havilland Aircraft since 1915". London: Putnam, 1962.
  4. Lamberton, W.M. et al. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Lethworth, Herts, UK: Harleyford, 1960, p. 42-43.
  5. Taylor, John W.R. "D.H.5;. Combat Aircraft of the World from 1909 to the Present". New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1969. ISBN 0-425-03633-2.

RAF S.E.5a

RAF SE.5a
RAF S.E.5a

Shortly after the development of the Scout Experimental 5, the improved S.E.5a was introduced. When it entered the war in 1917, it was superior to all its German opponents. Many pilots preferred it to the Sopwith Camel. It was easier to fly, it performed better at high altitude and its in-line engine produced less noise. It was also faster than the Sopwith Camel, allowing a pilot to break off combat at will. Disdained by Albert Ball, in the hands of airmen like William Bishop and Edward Mannock, the S.E.5a developed a reputation as a formidable fighter. With 54 victories, South African Anthony Beauchamp Proctor downed more enemy aircraft with this plane than any other ace.
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RAF S.E.5a
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Royal Aircraft Factory
  • Entered Service: June 1917 (S.E.5a)
  • Number Built: 5,205
  • Powerplant: Wolseley W4a Viper, water cooled in-line, 200 hp
  • Wing Span: 26 ft 7 in (8.11 m)
  • Length: 20 ft 11 in (6.38 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 6 in (2.89 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,410 lb (639 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,935 lb (880 kg)
  • Max Speed: 138 mph (222 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 17,000 ft (5,185 m)
  • Range: 300 miles (483 km)
  • Endurance: 2.5 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers machine gun
    • 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun on upper wing
    • Bombs: 4 × 18kg Cooper bombs, two under each lower wing

References

  1. From Wikipedia Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.5, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Aircraft_Factory_S.E.5"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "The S.E.5: Historic Military Aircraft No. 5". Flight, 17 July 1953. pp. 85–89, 93.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The S.E.5A". Aircraft in Profile", Volume 1/Part1. Windsor, Berkshire, UK: Profile Publications Ltd., 1965 (Revised 4th edition 1975). ISBN 0-85383-410-5.
  4. Franks, Norman L.R. "SE 5/5a Aces of World War 1". Botley, Oxford, UK: Osprey Publications, 2007. ISBN 1-846031-80-X.
  5. Kopan'ski, Tomasz Jan. "Samoloty brytyjskie w lotnictwie polskim 1918-1930" (British Aircraft in the Polish Air Force 1918-1930)(in Polish). Warsaw: Bellona, 2001. ISBN 83-11-09315-6.
  6. Sturtivant, Ray ISO and Gordon Page. "The SE5 File". Tunbridge Wells, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd., 1996. ISBN 0-85130-246-7.

Sopwith Camel

Sopwith Camel - 1917
Sopwith Camel

An agile, highly maneuverable biplane, the Sopwith Camel accounted for more aerial victories than any other Allied aircraft during World War I. Credited with destroying 1,294 enemy aircraft, it was called the Camel due to the humped fairing over its twin machine guns. Much like a real camel, this aircraft could turn and bite you. Noted for its tendency to kill inexperienced flyers, many pilots feared its vicious spin characteristics.

Until sufficient speed was developed during takeoff, Camel pilots maintained full right rudder to counteract the torque the rotary engine. Failure to do so often resulted in a ground loop with the Camel crashing on its starboard wingtip. During World War I, 413 pilots died in combat and 385 pilots died from non-combat related causes while flying the Sopwith Camel.

The type entered squadron service in June 1917 with No. 4 Squadron of the Royal Naval Air Service, near Dunkirk. The following month, it became operational with No. 70 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps. By February 1918, 13 squadrons were fully equipped with the Camel.
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Sopwith Camel
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • First Entered Service: May 1917
  • Number Built: 5,734
  • Powerplant:
    • Bentley BR.1, 150 hp (110 kW)
    • Le Rhône, Reciprocating 9 cylinder air cooled rotary, 110 hp. (82 kW)
    • Clerget 9B, 9 cylinder, air cooled rotary, 130 hp (97 kW)
    • Clerget 9Bf, 9 cylinder, air cooled rotary, 140 hp
  • Wing Span: 26 ft 11 in (8.53 m)
  • Length: 18 ft 9 in (5.71 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m)
  • Empty Weight: 930 lb (420 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,455 lb (660 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 115 mph (185 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 21,000 ft (6,400 m)
  • Range: 300 mi (485 km)
  • Endurance: 2.5 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • (F.1) 2 Vickers 0.303 machine guns
    • (2F.1) 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun & 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun
    • or 2 × Lewis 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Sopwith Camel, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Camel"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "Sopwith Camel: Historic Military Aircraft No 10: Part I." Flight, 22 April 1955, pp. 527-532.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "Sopwith Camel: Historic Military Aircraft No 10: Part II." Flight, 29 April 1955. pp. 560-563.
  4. Clark, Alan. Aces High: The War In The Air Over The Western Front 1914 - 1918. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1973. ISBN 0-29799-464-6.
  5. Ellis, Ken. "Wrecks & Relics", 21st edition. Manchester: Crecy Publishing, 2008. ISBN 9 780859 791342
  6. Jackson, A.J. "British Civil Aircraft 1919-1972: Volume III". London: Putnam, 1988. ISBN 0-85177-818-6.
  7. Robertson, Bruce. "Sopwith: The Man and His Aircraft". London: Harleyford, 1970. ISBN 0-90043-515-1.
  8. Sturtivant, Ray and Gordon Page. "The Camel File". Tunbridge Wells, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd., 1993. ISBN 0-85130-212-2.
  9. "United States Air Force Museum Guidebook". Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio: Air Force Museum Foundation, , 1975.
  10. Winchester, Jim, ed. "Sopwith Camel." Biplanes, Triplanes and Seaplanes (Aviation Factfile). London: Grange Books plc, 2004. ISBN 1-84013-641-3.

Sopwith Dolphin

Sopwith Dolphin
Sopwith Dolphin

The Dolphin was an unorthidox design with a reverse stagger to it's upper wing that was not received well in spite of it's performance in the field. Many pilots did not trust the design. With 20 victories, American Frederick Gillet scored more victories with the Sopwith Dolphin than any other ace

The Sopwith 5F.1 Dolphin was a British fighter aircraft manufactured by the Sopwith Aviation Company. It was used by the Royal Flying Corps and its successor, the Royal Air Force, during the First World War. The Dolphin entered service on the Western Front in early 1918 and proved to be a formidable fighter. The aircraft was not retained in the postwar inventory, however, and was retired shortly after the war.
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Sopwith Dolphin
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • First Introduced: February 1918
  • Number Built: 1532
  • Powerplant: Hispano-Suiza 8E, water cooled, V-8, 200 hp
  • Wing Span: 32 ft 6 in m (9.91)
  • Length: 22 ft 3 in (6.78 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,410 lb (641 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,959 lb (890 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 131 mph (211 km/h ) at sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,100 m)
  • Range: 315 km (195 mi )
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns
    • up to 2× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun
    • Bombs: Up to four 25 lb bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Sopwith Dolphin, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Dolphin"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Dolphin." Aircraft in Profile, Volume 8. New York: Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1970. ISBN 0-85383-016-9.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith 5F.1 Dolphin." Air Pictorial. Vol. 23, No. 5, May 1961.
  4. Bruce, J,M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three: Fighters". London: Macdonald, 1969, ISBN 0-35601-490-8.
  5. Connors, John F. "The 11th Hour Sopwiths." Wings, Volume 6, No. 1, February 1976.
  6. Cooksley, Peter. "Sopwith Fighters in Action" (Aircraft No. 110). Carrollton, Texas: Squadron/Signal Publications, 1991. ISBN 0-89747-256-X.
  7. Davis, Mick. Sopwith Aircraft". Ramsbury, Marlborough, Wiltshire: Crowood Press, 1999. ISBN 1-86126-217-5.
  8. Franks, Norman. "Dolphin and Snipe Aces of World War I" (Aircraft of the Aces No. 48). Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2002. ISBN 1-84176-317-9.
  9. Green, William and Gordon Swanborough. "The Complete Book of Fighters". London: Salamander Books, 1994. ISBN 0-83173-939-8.
  10. Kopañski, Tomasz Jan. "Samoloty brytyjskie w lotnictwie polskim 1918-1930" (British Aircraft in the Polish Air Force 1918-1930) (in Polish). Warsaw: Bellona, 2001. ISBN 8-31109-315-6.
  11. Lamberton, W.M., and E.F. Cheesman. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Letchworth, UK: Harleyford, 1960. ISBN 0-90043-501-1.
  12. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter Since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  13. Milberry, Larry. "Aviation in Canada: The Pioneer Decades". Toronto: CANAV Books, 2008. ISBN 0-921022-19-0.
  14. Milberry, Larry. "Sixty Years: The RCAF and Air Command 1924-1984". Toronto: CANAV Books, 1984. ISBN 0-9690703-4-9.
  15. Payne, Stephen, ed. "Canadian Wings: A Remarkable Century of Flight". Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre, 2006. ISBN 1-55365-167-7.
  16. Robertson, Bruce. "Sopwith – The Man and His Aircraft". London: Harleyford, 1970. ISBN 0-90043-515-1.