Bristol M1C

Bristol M1c
Bristol M1C

The Bristol M1C was a well designed and effective aircraft that was not given a real chance to show it's true potential. The M1C had a maximum speed aproximately 30-50 mph (50-80 km/h) faster than any of the contemporary German Fokker Eindecker monoplanes.

The M.1A prototype was designed by Frank Barnwell in 1916 and built as a private venture by the Bristol Aeroplane Corporation. The War Office ordered four aircraft for evaluation - designated M.1B - which had a single 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun mounted on the port wing and a clear-view cut-out in the starboard wing to give the pilot more downward visibility.
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Bristol M.1C Bullet
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Bristol Aeroplane Company
  • Designed by: Frank Barnwell
  • First Flight: 14 July 1916
  • Entered Service: 1917
  • Number Built: 130
  • Powerplant: 1× Le Rhône 9J rotary engine, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 9 in (9.37 m)
  • Wing Area: 145 ft² (13.6 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 5 in (6.24 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 9 in (2.37 m)
  • Empty Weight: 900 lb (409 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,348 lb (611 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 113 knots (130 mph, 209 km/h) at sea level
  • Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,096 m)
  • Endurance: 1 hr 45 mins
  • Crew: one, pilot
  • Armament: 1 × fixed-forward firing 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Bristol M.1C Bullet, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_M.1"
  2. Barnes, C.H. (1964). "Bristol Aircraft Since 1910" (First Edition ed.). London: Putnam.
  3. Jackson, Robert, "The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft", Paragon, 2002. ISBN 0-75258-130-9

Martinsyde G.100/G.102 "Elephant"

Martinsyde G.100
Martinsyde G.100
Martinsyde RG - 1916
Martinsyde RG - 1916

The G100 was built originally as a long range, single-seat fighter and escort machine but on the basis of its size and weight was reclassified as a day bomber. It successfully performed this role from the summer of 1916 through to the closing weeks of 1917. It was also used for long-range photo reconnaissance, where stability and endurance were required (the type was capable of a five and a half hour flight) .
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Martinsyde G.100/G.102 "Elephant"
  • Type: Biplane fighter/Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Martinsyde
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Number Built: 271
  • Powerplant: 1 × Beardmore straight 6-cylinder engine, 120 hp (90 kW)
  • Wingspan: 38 ft 0 in (11.59 m)
  • Wing Area: 410 ft² (38.1 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 6 in (8.07 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 8 in (2.95 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,795 lb (816 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,424 lb (1,102 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 83 knots (96 mph, 155 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 14,000 ft (4270 m)
  • Crew: One, pilot
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun mounted above upper wing centre section
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun mounted fixed aft of the cockpit pointing rearwards
    • Bombs: 260 lb (120 kg) bomb load

References

  1. From Wikipedia Martinsyde G.100, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martinsyde_G.100"
  2. "http://www.theaerodrome.com/aircraft/gbritain/martinsyde_g100.php"
  3. "http://www.britishaircraft.co.uk/aircraftpage.phpID=721"
  4. Mason, Francis K (1992). "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. pp. Pages 44–45. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  5. Cutlack, F.M. (1941) [1923]. "Appendix 1 Types of Fighting Aeroplanes". "The Official History of Australia in the War of 1914 - 1918: Volume VIII: The Australian Flying Corps in the Western and Eastern Theatres of War 1914-1918" (11th Edition ed.). Sydney: Angus and Robertson. pp. Page 404.
  6. Mason, Francis K (1994). "The British Bomber since 1914". London: Putnam Aeronautical Books. p. Pages74-75. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.
  7. "Aircraft of World War I", Kenneth Munson, 1967 Ian Allan ISBN 0-7110-0356-4

Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8

RAF FE.8 - 1916
Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8

The Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8 was one of the final pusher type aircraft developed for the war. It was considered a slow and not a particularly nimble aircraft design. There were not many in active service, and was superceded by more modern fighter/scouts.

Like the D.H.2, the F.E.8 was designed as a pusher in order to provide a forward firing machine gun mount at a time when no synchronization gear was available to the Allies to safely arm a tractor aircraft in the same way. Although a clean and well designed little aeroplane, for a pusher – it could not escape the drag penalty imposed by its tail structure and was no match for the Halberstadt and Albatros fighters of late 1916.

The new fighter was not a great improvement on the D.H.2 – although a little faster it did not handle quite so well. It was nonetheless ordered into production from Darracq Motors and Vickers. Neither manufacturer delivered their F.E.8s particularly quickly, so that the type ended up reaching the front in numbers six months later than the D.H.2.
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Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8
  • Type: Pusher biplane fighter
  • Manufacturer: Royal Aircraft Factory, Darracq Motors, Vickers
  • Designed By: J. Kenworthy
  • First Flight: September 1915
  • Introduced: August 2, 1916
  • Primary User: Royal Flying Corps
  • Number Built: 295
  • Powerplant: 1× Le Rhône nine-cylinder air-cooled rotary engine, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 31 ft 6 in (9.6 m)
  • Wing Area: 218 ft² (20.25 m²)
  • Length: 23ft 8 in (7.21 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 2 in (2.8 m)
  • Empty Weight: 960 lb (406 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,470 lb (668 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 93.6 mph (151 km/h, 81 knots)
  • Service Ceiling: 14,500 ft (4,420 m)
  • Climb to 6,000 ft: (1,830 m)8 min 20 sec
  • Endurance: 2.5 hours (Monosoupape engine)
  • Crew: One
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun
    • Bombs: Light bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Aircraft_Factory_F.E.8"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "Warplanes of the First World War: Volume 2 Fighters". London: Macdonald, 1968. ISBN 0-356-01473-8.
  3. Cheesman, E.F. (ed.) "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War" Letchworth: Harleyford, 1960
  4. Taylor, John W.R. "F.E.8. Combat Aircraft of the World from 1909 to the Present". New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1969. ISBN 0-425-03633-2.

Sopwith Pup

Sopwith Pup
Sopwith Pup

The Sopwith Pup quickly became a favorite with pilots of the Royal Naval Air Service. It was superior to the Fokker D.III and more than a match for any of the new Halberstadt and Albatros scouts. Armed with a single synchronous machine gun, it was lighter and less dangerous than it's successor, the Sopwith Camel.

Although underpowered, pilots liked the plane because it was maneuverable and fast. It could climb and hold its altitude better than any other fighter. In August 1917, the Sopwith Pup was the first aircraft to land aboard a moving ship, the Royal Navy's H.M.S. Furious.

In 1915, Sopwith produced the SLTBP, a personal aircraft for the company's test pilot, Harry Hawker. The SLTBP was a single-seat, tractor biplane powered by a 50 hp Gnome rotary engine. Sopwith next developed a larger fighter that was heavily influenced by the SLTBP.
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Sopwith Pup
  • Type: Biplane fighter
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • Designed By: Herbert Smith
  • First Flight: February 1916
  • Introduced: October 1916
  • Primary Users:
    • Royal Flying Corps
    • Royal Air Force
    • Royal Naval Air Service
  • Produced: 1916-1918
  • Number built: 1,770
  • Variants:
    • Alcock Scout
    • Beardmore W.B.III
  • Powerplant: 1× Le Rhône air-cooled rotary engine, 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m)
  • Wing Area: 254 ft² (23.6 m²)
  • Length: 19 ft 3¾ in (5.89 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 5 in (2.87 m)
  • Empty Weight: 787 lb (358 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,225 lb (557 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 97 knots (111½ mph, 180 km/h) at sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 17,500 feet (5,600 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft (3,050 m) 14 min
  • Climb to: 16,100 ft (4,910 m) 35 min
  • Crew: one
  • Armament: 1× 0.303 (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers gun

References

  1. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Pup: Historic Military Aircraft No 6". Flight, 1 January 1954, pp. 8-12.
  2. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Pup". Aircraft in Profile, Volume 1/Part 2. Windsor, Berkshire, UK: Profile Publications Ltd., 1965 (4th revised edition 1976). ISBN 0-85383-411-3.
  3. Bruce, J.M., Gordon Page and Ray Sturtivant. "The Sopwith Pup". Tunbridge Wells, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd., 2002. ISBN 0-85130-310-2.
  4. Franks, Norman and Harry Dempsey. "Sopwith Pup Aces of World War I" (Aircraft of the Aces). London: Osprey Publishing, 2005. ISBN 1-84176-886-3.
  5. Robertson, Bruce. "Sopwith – The Man and His Aircraft". London: Harleyford, 1970. ISBN 0-90043-515-1.
  6. Thetford, Owen. "British Naval Aircraft since 1912". London: Putnam, Fourth edition 1978. ISBN 0-370-30021-1.
  7. Winchester, Jim, ed. "Sopwith Pup Naval Fighter". Biplanes, Triplanes and Seaplanes (Aviation Factfile). London: Grange Books plc, 2004. ISBN 1-84013-641-3.

Sopwith Triplane

Sopwith Triplane
Sopwith Triplane

The Sopwith Triplane was used in combat by the Royal Naval Air Service. The stack of three wings reduced wingspan and increased wing area making it handle and climb better than biplanes. Visibility from the cockpit was outstanding but it was slower and less heavily armed than it's German opponents.
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Sopwith Triplane
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • Entered Service:28 May 1916
  • Number Built:147
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône 9B, air-cooled 9 cylinder rotary 130 hp. (97 kW)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft 6 in (8 m)
  • Length: 18 ft 10 in (5.73 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 6 in (3.2 m)
  • Empty Weight: 993 lb (450 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,415 lb (642 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 117 mph (187 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,830 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 20,500 ft (6,250 m)
  • Range: 280 mi (450 km)
  • Endurance: 2 hrs 45 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1× 0.303 (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Sopwith Triplane, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Triplane"
  2. Bowers, Peter M. and Ernest R. McDowell. "Triplanes: A Pictorial History of the World's Triplanes and Multiplanes". St. Paul, Minnesota: Motorbooks International, 1993. ISBN 0-87938-614-2.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "Sopwith Triplane" (Windsock Datafile 22). Berkhamsted, Herts, UK: Albatros Productions, 1990. ISBN 0-94841-426-X.
  4. Connors, John F. "Sopwith's Flying Staircase." Wings, Volume 5, No. 3, June 1975.
  5. Cooksley, Peter. "Sopwith Fighters in Action" (Aircraft No. 110). Carrollton, Texas: Squadron/Signal Publications, 1991. ISBN 0-89747-256-X.
  6. Davis, Mick. "Sopwith Aircraft. Ramsbury", Marlborough, Wiltshire: Crowood Press, 1999. ISBN 1-86126-217-5.
  7. Franks, Norman. "Sopwith Triplane Aces of World War I" (Aircraft of the Aces No. 62). Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2004. ISBN 1-84176-728-X.
  8. Hiscock, Melvyn. "Classic Aircraft of World War I" (Osprey Classic Aircraft). Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1994. ISBN 1-85532-407-5.
  9. Kennett, Lee. "The First Air War: 1914-1918". New York: The Free Press, 1991. ISBN 0-02917-301-9.
  10. Lamberton, W.M., and E.F. Cheesman. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Letchworth: Harleyford, 1960. ISBN 0-90043-501-1.
  11. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter Since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  12. Robertson, Bruce. "Sopwith – The Man and His Aircraft". London: Harleyford, 1970. ISBN 0-90043-515-1.
  13. Thetford, Owen. "British Naval Aircraft Since 1912". London: Putnam, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.

Vickers F.B.12

Vickers F.B.12
Vickers F.B.12

The slow, low flying and fragile Vickers F.B.12 marks the last gasp for British pusher-type fightercraft development. The introduction of the Sopwith Pup, and Triplane, which were both far superior aircraft in terms of handling characteristics, maximum speed, and operational celings killed chances for the F.B.12 before it could enter into production.

At the start of the First World War, Vickers entered into a partnership with the Hart Engine Company to develop a 150 hp (110 kW) nine-cyliner radial engine designed by Hart. This engine was planned to power a number of new designs by Vickers, the first of which was a small single-engine pusher biplane fighter, the F.B.12.
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Vickers F.B.12
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • First Flight: July 1916
  • Number Built: 22
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome Monosoupape nine-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft in (7.93 m)
  • Wing area: 204 ft² (19.0 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 6 in (6.55 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 8 in (2.64 m)
  • Empty weight: 845 lb (384 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,275 lb (580 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 86 mph (138 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Service ceiling: 11,500 ft (3,500 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 - 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers F.B.12, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.12"
  2. Bruce, J.M. (1969)." War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three Fighters". london: Macdonald. ISBN 356 01490 8. .
  3. Lamberton, W.M. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Herts: Harleyford Publications Ltd..
.

Vickers F.B.19

Vickers F.B.19
Vickers F.B.19

The Vickers F.B.19 was an aircraft with several design flaws that prevented it from becoming popular, or widely used aircraft. It was relatively slow, underpowered, and not at all capable of reaching higher altitudes.
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Vickers F.B.19
  • Type: Fighter
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône 9J air-cooled 9 cylinder rotary, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 24 ft 0 in (7.31 m)
  • Length: 18 ft 2 in (5.54 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 3 in (2.51 m)
  • Empty Weight: 893 lb (405 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,477 lb (670 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 98 mph, 85 knots (158 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 16,995 ft (5,180 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1× 0.303 (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Vickers_FB-19, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.19"
  2. "Virtual Aircraft Museum". avia.russian.ee. http://avia.russian.ee/air/england/vickers_fb-19.php.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes Of The First World War: Volume Three Fighters". London: Macdonald, 1969. ISBN 0 356 01490 8.