Bristol Aircraft 1914

Bristol TB.8

Bristol TB 8H
Bristol TB 8H - 1914

The Bristol T.B.8 was an early (1913-14) British biplane built by the Bristol Aeroplane Company, which was produced in significant numbers (54 were built) for the time. While mainly used as a trainer, T.B.8s were briefly used as bombers at the start of the First World War by the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS).

Henri Coanda, chief designer of the Bristol Aeroplane Company, developed the T.B.8 as a biplane development of his earlier Bristol-Coanda Monoplane to meet an order from the British Admiralty, the first aircraft, a conversion of a Bristol-Coanda monoplane, flying on 12 August 1913 . This aircraft was tested with both wheeled undercarriage and floats.

The T.B.8 was a single engined, two seat biplane, with two bay wings and a slender fuselage. While early T.B.8s used wing warping, later production aircraft were fitted with ailerons. They were normally fitted with a distinctive four wheel undercarriage. T.B.8s were powered by a variety of rotary engines, including Gnome and Le Rhône engines with power ranging from 50 hp Gnomes to 100 hp Gnome Monosoupape engines . T.B.8s were produced both by conversion of Coanda Monoplanes, and by new production.
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Bristol TB.8
  • Type: Trainer
  • Manufacturer: Bristol Aeroplane Company
  • Designed By: Henri Coanda
  • First Flight: 1913
  • Introduced: 1913
  • Retired: 1916
  • Primary Users:
    • Royal Naval Air Service
    • Royal Flying Corps
    • Romanian Air Force
  • Number Built: 54
  • Developed From: Bristol-Coanda Monoplanes
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome Rotary engine, 80hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 8 in (11.48 m)
  • Wing Area: 450 ft² (41.8 m²)
  • Length: 29 ft 3 in (8.92 m)
  • Empty weight: 970lb (441 kg)
  • Maxium Takeoff Weight: 1,665 lb (757 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 56-61 knots (65-70 mph, 105-113 km/h)
  • Climb to 3000 ft (915 m): 11 min
  • Endurance: 5 hours
  • Crew: Two
  • Armament: Light bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Bristol TB.8, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_TB.8"
  2. Mason, Francis K (1994). "The British Bomber since 1914". London: Putnam Aeronautical Books. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.
  3. Barnes, C.H. (1964). "Bristol Aircraft Since 1910" (First Edition ed.). London: Putnam.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions. pp. 204.
  5. Thetford, Owen (1994). "British Naval Aircraft since 1912" (Fourth Edition ed.). London: Putnam. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.
  6. Barnes, C.H. (1964). "Bristol Aircraft Since 1910" (First Edition ed.). London: Putnam. p.81-2, 85

Bristol Aircraft 1915

Bristol Scout D

Bristol Scout D - 1915
Bristol Scout D - 1915
Bristol Scout D

One of the first aircraft produced in large numbers for Britain was the Bristol Scout. Based upon Frank Barnwell's pre-war racing plane, it was considered fast and maneuverable when it entered service.

The Scout was the first attempt by the Royal Flying Corps to develop a true fighter. Initially unarmed, Lanoe Hawker devised a method for mounting a Lewis gun to the side of the aircraft. In March 1916, the Scout D became the first British fighter to be armed with a synchronized machine gun. Soon outdated by more efficient designs, it was withdrawn from service in the summer of 1916 and used as a trainer.

Bristol Scout D
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: British & Colonial Aeroplane Company, Ltd.
  • Entered Service: November 1915
  • Number Built: 210
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône9C rotary 80 hp
  • Wing Span: 24 ft 7 in (7.49 m)
  • Length: 20 ft 8 in (6.3 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 6 in (2.6 m)
  • Empty Weight: 760 lbs (345 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,250 lb (567 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 100 mph {161 km/h at sea level)
  • Service Ceiling: 16,000 ft (4,877 m)
  • Endurance: 2 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 Vickers or Lewis machine gun

References

  1. From WikipediaBristol Scout, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_Scout"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "The Bristol Scouts" (Windsock Datafile No.44). Berkhamsted, Herts, UK: Albatros Publications, 1994. ISBN 0-948414-59-6.

Bristol Aircraft 1916

Bristol M1C

Bristol M1c
Bristol M1C - 1916

The Bristol M1C was a well designed and effective aircraft that was not given a real chance to show it's true potential. The M1C had a maximum speed aproximately 30-50 mph (50-80 km/h) faster than any of the contemporary German Fokker Eindecker monoplanes.

The M.1A prototype was designed by Frank Barnwell in 1916 and built as a private venture by the Bristol Aeroplane Corporation. The War Office ordered four aircraft for evaluation - designated M.1B - which had a single 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun mounted on the port wing and a clear-view cut-out in the starboard wing to give the pilot more downward visibility.
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Bristol M.1C Bullet
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Bristol Aeroplane Company
  • Designed by: Frank Barnwell
  • First Flight: 14 July 1916
  • Entered Service: 1917
  • Number Built: 130
  • Powerplant: 1× Le Rhône 9J rotary engine, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 9 in (9.37 m)
  • Wing Area: 145 ft² (13.6 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 5 in (6.24 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 9 in (2.37 m)
  • Empty Weight: 900 lb (409 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,348 lb (611 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 113 knots (130 mph, 209 km/h) at sea level
  • Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,096 m)
  • Endurance: 1 hr 45 mins
  • Crew: one, pilot
  • Armament: 1 × fixed-forward firing 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Bristol M.1C Bullet, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_M.1"
  2. Barnes, C.H. (1964). "Bristol Aircraft Since 1910" (First Edition ed.). London: Putnam.
  3. Jackson, Robert, "The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft", Paragon, 2002. ISBN 0-75258-130-9

Bristol Aircraft 1917

Bristol F.2 Fighter

Bristol Fighter  F.2b - 1917
Bristol F.2 Fighter - 1917

The versatile Bristol Fighter was a maneuverable, heavily armed two-seater biplane designed by Frank S. Barnwell. One of the most successful fighters of the war, it got off to a poor start during "Bloody April" when it was introduced to the Western Front by the inexperienced pilots and observers of 48 Squadron.

The Bristol Fighter was a rugged and dangerous adversery for any German plane that came in contact with it. Some were fitted with twin 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns on a swivel mount, as well as a well protected 0.303 in (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers machine gun. This plane's career lasted many years after the conclusion of world war.
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Bristol F.2 Fighter
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: British & Colonial Aeroplane Co. Ltd.
  • Entered Service: Early 1917
  • Powerplant: Rolls-Royce Falcon-III, water cooled in-line 275 hp. (205 kW)
  • Wingspan: 39 ft 3 in (11.96 m)
  • Length: 25 ft 10 in (7.87 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 9 in (2.97 m)
  • Empty Weight: 2,145 lb (975 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,243 lb (1,474 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 123 mph (107 kn, 198 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,500 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 18,000 ft (5,500 m)
  • Range: 369 mi (593 km)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers machine gun in the upper fuselage
    • 1 or 2× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns in the observer's cockpit
    • Bombs: 240 lb (110 kg)

References

  1. From Wikipedia Bristol F.2 Fighter, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_F.2_Fighter"
  2. Barnes, C.H. "Bristol Aircraft since 1910". London: Putnam, 1964.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The Bristol Fighter". Flight, 7 November 1952, pp. 587-591.
  4. Bruce, J.M. "Warplanes of the First World War, Vol. 1". London: Macdonald, 1965.
  5. Cheesman, E.F., ed. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Letchworth, Harleyford, UK: Aero Publishers, Inc., 1960.
  6. Gutman, J. "Bristol F2 Fighter Aces of World War 1". London: Osprey Publishing, 2007. ISBN 978-1-84603-201-1.
  7. Kopan'ski, Tomasz Jan. "Samoloty Brytyjskie w Lotnictwie Polskim 1918-1930" (British Aircraft in the Polish Air Force 1918-1930) (in Polish). Bellona, Warsaw: 2001. ISBN 83-11-09315-6.

Bristol Aircraft 1918

Bristol Braemar

Bristol Braemar Mk.II - 1918
Bristol Braemar Mk.II - 1918

The Bristol Braemar was a British heavy bomber aircraft developed at the end of the First World War for the Royal Air Force. Only two prototypes were constructed.

The prototype Braemar was developed in response to the establishment of the Independent Air Force in October 1917, as a bomber capable of the long-range bombing of Berlin if necessary. A large triplane, it had internal stowage for up to six 250 lb (110 kg) bombs.

The initial design featured a unique engine installation with a central engine room housing all four engines. The engines were to be geared in pairs and power taken from the engines to the four propellers by power shafts. This design was abandoned early in development, and both the completed Braemars had a conventional engine installation, with the engines in inline tandem pairs, driving pusher and tractor propellers. However, the engine-room design was resurrected later in the Braemar's development life, for the proposed steam-powered Tramp.
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Braemar Mk.II
  • Role: Heavy bomber
  • National Origin: Great Britian
  • Manufacturer: Bristol Aeroplane Company
  • Designed by: Frank Barnwell
  • First flight: August 13, 1918
  • Number built: 2
  • Developed into: Bristol Pullman
  • Powerplant: 4 × Liberty L-12 inline engine, 400 hp (300 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 81 ft 8 in (24.89 m)
  • Wing area: 1,905 ft² (177 m²)
  • Length: 51 ft 6 in (15.73 m)
  • Height: 20 ft (6.10 m)
  • Empty weight: 10,650 lb (4,840 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 18,000 lb (8,170 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 109 kn (125 mph, 200 km/h) at sea level
  • Range: more than 1,000 mi ()
  • Service ceiling: 17,000 ft (5,100 m)
  • Wing loading: 9.45 lb/ft² (46.2 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.08 hp/lb (150 W/kg)
  • Crew: 6 - two pilots, wireless operator, engineer and two gunners
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine guns
    • Bombs: up to six 250 lb (110 kg) bombs total: 1,500 lb (680 kg)

References

  1. Bristol Braemar. (2010, November 10). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 06:38, March 8, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bristol_Braemar&oldid=395872431
  2. Barnes C.H. (1964). Bristol Aircraft Since 1910. Putnam & Company Ltd. ISBN 0-370-00015-3