German Bombers 1915

Friedrichshafen G.III

Friedrichshafen G.III - 1915
Friedrichshafen G.III - 1915
Friedrichshafen G.IIIa - 1917
Friedrichshafen G.IIIa - 1917

In front-line service with the Luftstreitkräfte, the G.III series equipped a large portion of the bomber force until the end of the war. The G.III series bombers served mainly on the Western Front where they were used to great effect, mostly in nocturnal attacks, on both tactical targets behind the Allied front-lines as well as for strategic air raids on major urban centers such as Paris. As far as is known no Friedrichshafen bombers of any type ever participated in strategic air raids on Britain because they lacked the range needed. The attacks on Britain were conducted exclusively by Gotha G.IV and G.V medium bombers, Zeppelin Staaken R.IV heavy bombers and Zeppelin airships. The G.III was generally well liked by its military crews for its superior load carrying capability, reliability, robustness and relatively low accident rate.
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Friedrichshafen G.III
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen GmbH
  • Designed by: Karl Gehlen
  • First Flight: 1915
  • Production Run: 1915 to 1918
  • Powerplant: 2× Mercedes D.IVa, water cooled six-cylinder, in-line engine, 260 hp (194 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 77 ft 9.25 in (23.70 m)
  • Length: 42 ft (12.8 m)
  • Height: 12 ft (3.66 m)
  • Wing Area: 1,023 ft² (95 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 5,941 lb (2,695 kg)
  • Maximum Takeoff Weight: 8,664 lb (3,930 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 84 mph (135 km/h)
  • Range: 373 mi (600 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 14,764 ft (4,500 m)
  • Endurance: 5 hours
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: Usually 2-3 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine guns.
    • Bombs: Any combination of 7.5 lb (12.5 kg), 110 lb (50 kg), 220 lb (100 kg), 660 lb (300 kg) or 2,200 lb (1,000 kg) P.u.W bombs or air-mines up to a maximum warload of 2,200 lb (1000 kg).

References

  1. From Wikipedia Friedrichshafen G.III, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrichshafen_G.III;
  2. , John Batchelor and Lowe, Malcom V.. The Complete Encyclopedia of Flight 1848-1939
  3. Grosz, Peter M. Windsock Datafile 65 Friedrichshafen G.III / G.IIIa, Berkhamsted 1997, ISBN 0-948414-97-9

Gotha G.I

Gotha G.I - 1915
Gotha G.I - 1915

The Gotha G.I was a heavy bomber used by the Luftstreitkräfte (Imperial German Air Service) during World War I.

In mid-1914, Oskar Ursinus, the founder and editor of the German flying magazine Flugsport, began designing a large twin-engine seaplane of unconventional configuration. While most biplane designs have the fuselage attached to the lower wing, Ursinus had a snub-nosed fuselage attached to the upper wing, and twin engine nacelles mounted on the lower one. The purpose of this arrangement was to allow the engines to be kept close together thereby minimizing asymmetrical thrust in the event of an engine failure, although Ursinus later also claimed that this design balanced out the lowering of the centre of pressure as speed increased, and minimised the drag on the upper wing caused by turbulence from the fuselage.
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Gotha G.I
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Gothaer Waggonfabrik AG
  • Designed by: Oskar Ursinus and Helmut Friedel
  • First Flight: January 30, 1915
  • Number Built: 20
  • Length: 39 ft 4 in (12.00 m)
  • Wingspan: 66 ft 7 in (20.30 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 10 in (3.9 m)
  • Wing Area: 882 ft² (82.0 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 3,970 lb (1,800 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 6,539 lb (2,966 kg)
  • Engines: 2× Benz Bz.III inline engine, 150 hp (110 kW) each
  • Maximum Speed: 80 mph (130 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: 140 ft/min (0.7 m/s)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 3 × 7.92 mm (.312 in) Parabellum MG14 machine guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Gotha G.I, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gotha_G.I
  2. Grosz, Peter M. The Gotha GI - GV, 1966. Leatherhead, Surrey: Profile Publications.
  3. Grosz, Peter M. Gotha G.I, 2000. Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire: Albatros Productions.
  4. Cooksley, Peter. German Bombers of World War I in Action, 2000. Carrollton, Texas: Squadron/Signal. pp. 22.
  5. Chant, Chris. The World's Great Bombers: From 1914 to the Present Day, 2000. Wigston, Leicester: Silverdale Books. pp. 25.

Rumpler G.I, G.II and G.III

Rumpler G.I - 1915
Rumpler G.I - 1915

The Rumpler G.I was a bomber aircraft produced in Germany during World War I, together with refined versions known as the G.II and G.III. Based on a prototype with the factory designation 4A15, the G.I and its successors were built to a conventional bomber design for their time, two-bay biplanes with unstaggered wings of unequal span. The pilot sat in an open cockpit just forward of the wings, and open positions were provided the nose and amidships for a gunner and observer. The engines were mounted pusher-fashion in nacelles atop the lower wings and enclosed in streamlined cowlings. Fixed tricycle undercarriage was fitted, with dual wheels on each unit.

The G.II version was almost identical, but featured more powerful engines and carried a second 0.312 in (7.92 mm) machine gun and increased bombload. The G.III was again similar, but had engine nacelles that were now mounted on short struts clear of the lower wing.

Rumpler G.III
  • Type: Bomber aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Rumpler
  • First Flight: 1915
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Number Built: ca 220
  • Powerplant: 2 × Mercedes D.IV, 260 hp (190 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 63 ft 4 in (19.30 m)
  • Wing Area: 785 ft² (73.0 m²)
  • Length: 39 ft 4 in (12.00 m)
  • Height: 19 ft 2 in (4.50 m)
  • Empty Weight: 5,203 lb (2,365 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 7,964 lb (3,620 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 103 mph 165 km/h()
  • Service Ceiling: 16,000 ft (5,000 m)
  • Range: 440 mi (700 km)
  • Crew: Three
  • Armament:
    • Gun - Forward: 1 × trainable 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine gun in nose
    • Gun - Rear: 1 × trainable 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine gun in dorsal position
    • Bombs: 250 kg (550 lb) of bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Rumpler G.I, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumpler_G.I
  2. Gray, Peter; Owen Thetford (1962). German Aircraft of the First World War. London: Putnam.
  3. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft. London: Aerospace Publishing.
  4. Kroschel, Günter; Helmut Stützer (1994). Die Deutschen Militärflugzeuge 1910-1918. Herford: Verlag E.S. Mittler & Sohn.
  5. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions.

Siemens-Schuckert Steffen R - Series

Siemens-Schuckert Steffen R.I
Siemens-Schuckert Steffen R.I s/n R1/15-1915
Siemens-Schuckert Steffen R.III -1916
Siemens-Schuckert Steffen R.III s/n R3/15 -1916

In December of 1914 Siemens-Schuckert began the construction of a series of seven R aircraft, (Riesenflugzeug - giant aircraft) for the Imperial Military Aviation Service. These aircraft were essentially similar differing only in detail, engine installations and wing design.

All of the seven Steffen designed aircraft were powered by three engines mounted in the forward compartment of the fuselage driving two tractor propellers mounted between the mainplanes via clutches, shafts and gearboxes. The large forward compartment also housed the crew of between four and six in an enclosed cabin and open gun positions. Attached to the forward compartment were triangular section diverging booms, top and bottom, which supported the tail section, allowing the rear gunners, in positions between the boom attachments, a wide field of fire.

The R.I was used in non-operational roles at the eastern front and retained for training. R.II and R.III were used for training only, but R.IV, R.V, R.VI and R.VII were all used on operational missions by Rfa 501 (Riesenflugzeug abteilung) at Vilna on the eastern front.

Siemens-Schuckert Steffen R.V
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Siemens-Schuckert Werke G.m.b.H.
  • Designed By: Bruno & Franz Steffen
  • First Flight: May 1915
  • Number Built: 7
  • Powerplant: 3 × Benz Bz IV, 220 hp (164 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 34.33 m (112 ft 7.75 in)
  • Wing area: 177 m² (1,912 ft²)
  • Length: 17.7 m (58 ft 0.875 in)
  • Height: 4.6 m (15 ft 1.125 in)
  • Empty weight: 5,300 kg (11,600 lb)
  • Gross weight: 6,766 kg (14,885 lb)
  • Maximum speed: 132 km/h (82.5 mph)
  • Rate of climb: 0.93 m/s (183 ft/min)
  • Crew: 6
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 4 × machine guns in open gun positions.
    • Bombs: approx 500 kg of bombs.

Variants

References

  1. From Wikipedia Siemens-Schuckert Steffen R.I, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siemens-Schuckert_Steffen_R.I
  2. Haddow, G.W. & Grosz, Peter M. The German Giants, The Story of the R-planes 1914-1919 London. Putnam. 1963.
  3. Gray, Peter & Thetford, Owen. German Aircraft of the First World War. London, Putnam. ISBN 0 370 00103 6

German Bombers 1916

A.E.G. G.IV

A.E.G. G-IV - 1916
A.E.G. G-IV - 1916

The AEG G.IV was a biplane bomber aircraft used in the World War I by Germany. It was developed from the AEG G.III, with refinements to power, bomb-load, and dimensions. Serving late in the war, the AEG G.IV managed to achieve some operational success in reconnaissance and combat roles. Coming into service in late 1916, it featured a bomb capacity twice as large as that of the AEG G.II, but was still considered inadequate in terms of offensive capacity and performance. Further improvements led to the development of the G.V, but the Armistice came before the replacement could become operational.

Because of its relatively short range, the G.IV served mainly as a tactical bomber, and operated close to the front lines. The G.IV flew both day and night operations, but, as the war progressed, was restricted increasingly to night missions. A.E.G. units operated in France, Romania, Greece, and Italy.

The Allgemeine Elektricitäts-Gesellschaft (A.E.G.) G.IV was derived from the earlier G.III. Designed as a tactical bomber, the relatively modern technology included onboard radios and electrically heated suits for the crew. The AEG G.IV also had a quality that endeared it to the men who flew it -it was an extremely rugged aircraft. Unlike the other German bombers such as the Gotha and the Friedrichshafen, the AEG featured an all metal, welded tube frame. Well equipped with armament, although the rear gunner's cockpit was on the top of the fuselage, the position was equipped with a hinged window in the floor for viewing and fending off pursuing aircraft.
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A.E.G. G-IV
  • Type: Tactical Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Allgemeine Elektrizitäts Gesellschaft
  • First flight: 1916
  • Introduced: 1916
  • Retired: 1918
  • Engines: 2 × Mercedes D.IVa 6-cylinder water cooled inline engine, 260 hp (194 kW) each
  • Number Built: 320
  • Wing Span: 18.4 m (60 ft 4 in)
  • Wing area: 675 ft² (67 m²)
  • Length: 9.7 m(31 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 3.9 m (12 ft 8 in)
  • Empty Weight: 5,280 lb (2,400 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 7,986 lb (3,630 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 8,000 lb (3,628 kg)
  • Cruising Speed: 145 km/h (90 mph)
  • Max Speed: 90 kn, 103 mph (166 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: to 3,280 ft (1000 m): 5 min
  • Service Ceiling: 4,500 m (14,760 ft)
  • Wing Loading: 11.8 lb/ft² (54.2 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 98.6 W/kg (0.0601 hp/lb)
  • Range: 406 nmi, 467 mi (750 km)
  • Endurance: 4-5 hr cruise
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament
    • Guns: 2 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) machine guns
    • Bombs: 880 lb (400 kg) of bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia AEG G.IV, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AEG_G.IV
  2. Sharpe, Michael. Biplanes, Triplanes, and Seaplanes. London, England: Friedman/Fairfax Books , 2000. Page 15. ISBN 1-58663-300-7.
  3. Grey, Peter and Thetford, Owen. German Aircraft of the First World War. London: Putnam, 1962. ISBN 0-370-00103-6.
  4. Molson, Kenneth M. Canada's National Aviation Museum: Its History and Collections. Ottawa, Canada: National Museum of Science and Technology , 1988. ISBN 0-17596-248-1.

Albatros G.III

Albatros G.III - 1916
Albatros G.III - 1916

The Albatros Flugzeugwerke began experiments for developing a Großkampfflugzeug or large battle aircraft with the construction of the unsuccessful and underpowered Albatros G.I. The next stage of development was the prototype Albatros G.II, which was fitted with more powerful engines. Performance was still judged to be inadequate and development continued as the Albatros G.III

The Albatros G.III was a German medium bomber aircraft developed during World War I. It was a large, single-bay biplane of unequal span and unstaggered wings. Power was provided by two Benz Bz.IVa 220 hp (164 kW) pusher engines installed in nacelles carried between the wings. An unusual feature of the design was that the lower wing was provided with cutouts for the large propellers, allowing the engine nacelles to be mounted further forward than would have been otherwise possible.

Armament comprised two trainable .0312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine guns - one each in the nose and rear cockpits - plus 720 lb (325 kg) of bombs.

The G.II prototype first flew in mid-1916 and G.III entered service in Macedonia and elsewhere in 1917. The Albatros G.III only entered limited production, few examples of the aircraft were built.

Albatros G.III
  • Role: Bomber
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Albatros Flugzeugwerke
  • First flight: mid 1916
  • Introduced: 1917
  • Primary user: German Empire Luftstreitkräfte
  • Powerplant: 2 × Benz Bz.IVa, 220 hp (164 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 59 ft 0 in1 (8.0 m)
  • Wing area: 850 ft² (79.0 m²)
  • Length: 39 ft 0 in (11.9 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 9 in (4.2 m)
  • Empty weight: 4,550 lb (2,064 kg)
  • Gross weight: 6,945 lb (3,150 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 94 mph (150 km/h)
  • Range: 370 miles (600 km)
  • Service ceiling: 16,400 ft (5,000 m)
  • Rate of climb: 260 ft/min (1.3 m/s)
  • Crew: three, pilot, observer, and engineer
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 × .0312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine guns
    • Bombs: 720 lb (325 kg) of bombs

References

  1. Albatros G.II. (2010, August 1). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 12:22, March 18, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Albatros_G.II&oldid=376610297
  2. Albatros G.III. (2011, February 20). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 12:30, March 18, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Albatros_G.III&oldid=414942204
  3. Albatros G III 1916 the Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 12:22, March 18, 2011, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/germany/albatros_g3.php
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. pp. 53-59.
  5. Chant, Chris (2000). The World's Great Bombers: 1914 to the Present Day. Rochester: Grange Books.

DFW R.I

DFW R.I - 1916
DFW R.I - 1916

The DFW R.I was a prototype German bomber aircraft of World War I. Developed as a private venture by DFW, it was a large biplane of conventional configuration with four engines mounted inside the fuselage, powering propellers on the wings via transmission shafts - two mounted tractor-fashion on the leading edge of the upper wing, and two mounted pusher-fashion on the trailing edge of the lower wing.
[Read more]

DFW R.I
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Deutsche Flugzeugwerke GmbH (DFW)
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 4 × Mercedes D.IV inline piston engine, 220 hp (164 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 100 ft (30.5 m)
  • Length: 57 ft 9 in (17.6 m)
  • Empty weight: 15,000 lb (6800 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 20,700 lb (9400 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 81 mph (130 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: 330 ft/min (1.7 m/s)

References

  1. From Wikipedia DFW R.I, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DFW_R.I
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation, 1989. London: Studio Editions. pp. 325.
  3. Haddow, G.W. & Peter M. Grosz, The German Giants, The Story of the R-planes 1914-1919, First Published July 1962, Putnam & Company Limited, 42 Great Russell Street, London
  4. The German D.F.W. Four-Engined Commercial Biplane Flight 25 September 1919, pp. 1274-78

Gotha G.II

Gotha G.II - 1918
Gotha G.II - 1916

The Gotha G.II series was a heavy bomber used by the Luftstreitkräfte (Imperial German Air Service) during World War I.

The Gotha G.II was an entirely new biplane designed by Hans Burkhard, who had previously reworked Oskar Ursinus's design for the G.I to make it suitable for mass-production. Burkhard abandoned the G.I's unorthodox configuration in favor of a more conventional design with the fuselage mounted on the bottom wing rather than the top.
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Gotha G.II
  • Role: Bomber
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Gothaer Waggonfabrik AG
  • Designed by: Hans Burkhard
  • First flight: March 1916
  • Primary user: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Number built: 11
  • Powerplant: 2 × Mercedes D.IV inline engine, 220 hp (164 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 77 ft 9 in (23.70 m)
  • Wing area: 963 ft² (89.5 m²)
  • Empty weight: 4,810 lb (2,182 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 7,037 lb (3,192 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 92 mph (148 km/h)
  • Rate of climb: 350 ft/min (1.8 m/s)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament: 2 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine guns

References

  1. Gotha G.II. (2011, January 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 10:05, March 3, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gotha_G.II&oldid=405859079
  2. Grosz, Peter M. (1966). The Gotha GI - GV. Leatherhead, Surrey: Profile Publications.
  3. Grosz, Peter M. (1994). Gotha!. Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire: Albatros Productions.
  4. Cooksley, Peter (2000). German Bombers of World War I in Action. Carrollton, Texas: Squadron/Signal.
  5. Chant, Chris (2000). The World's Great Bombers: From 1914 to the Present Day. Wigston, Leicester: Silverdale Books.

Gotha G.III

Gotha G.III - 1916
Gotha G.III - 1916

The Gotha G.III was a heavy bomber used by the Luftstreitkräfte (Imperial German Air Service) during World War I. It succeeded the G.II in production and differed primarily in the choice of powerplant. The eight-cylinder Mercedes D.IV, which had proven highly susceptible to crankshaft failure, was replaced by the new six-cylinder 260 hp (190 kW) Mercedes D.IVa engine. The G.III also featured a reinforced fuselage with an extra 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine gun firing through a ventral trapdoor. The G.III was also the first bomber to have a tail gun with a potential 360° arc of fire.

Most of the 25 G.III aircraft produced were delivered to Kagohl 1, operating in the Balkans out of Hudova. Combat service of the G.III was limited but effective. Its most notable accomplishment came in September 1916, when a formation of G.III aircraft destroyed the railway bridge over the Danube River at Cernavoda(, Romania. It also saw use by Kagohl 2 on the Western Front, operating from Freiburg. Following the delivery of the G.IIIs to this unit, its commander complained to Berlin about the performance of the aircraft, not because they were too slow, but because they were outrunning their escort fighters. In September 1917, all surviving aircraft were withdrawn from combat and relegated to training units.

Gotha G.III
  • Role: Bomber
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Gothaer Waggonfabrik AG
  • Designed by: Hans Burkhard
  • First flight: 1916
  • Primary user: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Produced: 1916
  • Number built: 25
  • Length: 40 ft 0 in (12.2 m)
  • Wingspan: 77 ft 9 in 23.7 m()
  • Height: 12 ft 10 in (3.9 m)
  • Wing area: 563 ft² (89.5 m²)
  • Empty weight: 5,253 lb (2,383 kg)
  • Gross weight: 7,976 lb (3,618 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Mercedes D.IVa, 260 hp (193 kW) each
  • Maximum speed: 83 mph (135 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours 45 min
  • Crew: Three
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 to 3 × 7.92 mm (.312 in) Parabellum MG14 machine guns
    • Bombs: 500 kg (1,100 lb) of bombs

References

  1. Gotha G.III. (2011, February 20). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 10:11, March 3, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gotha_G.III&oldid=414938163
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. pp. 426.
  3. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 895 Sheet 08.
  4. Grosz, Peter M. (1966). The Gotha GI - GV. Leatherhead, Surrey: Profile Publications.
  5. Grosz, Peter M. (1994). Gotha!. Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire: Albatros Productions.
  6. Murphy, Justin: Military Aircraft, Origins to 1918: An Illustrated History of Their Impact. Published by ABC-CLIO, 2005. Page 175. ISBN 1851094881

German Bombers 1917

Gotha G.IV

Gotha G.IV - 1917
Gotha G.IV - 1917

The Gotha G.IV was a heavy bomber used by the Luftstreitkräfte (Imperial German Air Service) during World War I. Experience with the G.III showed that the rear gunner could not efficiently operate both the dorsal and ventral positions. Hans Burkhard's ultimate solution was the "Gotha tunnel," a trough connecting an aperture in the upper decking with a large opening extending across the bottom of the rear fuselage. The Gotha tunnel allowed a gunner at the dorsal position to depress his gun into the aperture and fire through the fuselage at targets below and behind the bomber. A ventral 0.312 in (7.92 mm) machine gun could still be mounted, and there was even a provision for a fourth machine gun on a post between the pilot's and bombardier's cockpits, although this was rarely carried due to the weight penalty it imposed on the bombload.

The G.IV introduced other changes. The fuselage was fully skinned in plywood, eliminating the partial fabric covering of the G.III. Although it was not the reason for this modification, it was noted at the time that the plywood skinning enabled the fuselage to float for some time in the event of a water landing. Furthermore, complaints of poor lateral control, particularly on landing, led to the addition of ailerons on the lower wing.
[Read more]

Gotha G.IV
  • Role: Bomber
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Gothaer Waggonfabrik, Siemens-Schuckert Werke, LVG
  • Designed by: Hans Burkhard
  • First flight: 1916
  • Introduced: February 1916
  • Operators:
    • Germany: Luftstreitkräfte
    • Austria-Hungary: KuKLFT
  • Produced: 1916 to 1917
  • Number built: 230
  • Powerplant: 2 × Mercedes D.IVa, 260 hp (193 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 77 ft 9 in (23.7 m)
  • Wing area: 563 ft² (89.5 m²)
  • Length: 40 ft 0 in (12.2 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 10 in (3.9 m)
  • Empty weight: 5,320 lb (2,413 kg)
  • Gross weight: 8,042 lb (3,648 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 83 mph (135 km/h)
  • Service ceiling: 16,400 ft (5,000 m)
  • Endurance: 6 hours
  • Range: 434 miles (700 km)
  • Crew: Three
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 or 3 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum LMG 14 machine guns
    • Bomb Load: 1100lbs (500kg)

References

  1. Gotha G.IV. (2010, July 16). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 10:14, March 3, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gotha_G.IV&oldid=373828448
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. pp. 426.
  3. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 895 Sheet 08.
  4. Grosz, Peter M. (1966). The Gotha GI - GV. Leatherhead, Surrey: Profile Publications.
  5. Grosz, Peter M. (1994). Gotha!. Berkhamstead, Hertfordshire: Albatros Productions.

Gotha G.V.

Gotha G.V - 1917
Gotha G.V - 1917

The Gotha Bomber was produced in the autumn of 1916 when the limitations of the Zeppelin as a raider had become obvious. The German High Command ordered that 30 Gotha bombers were to be ready for a daylight raid on London on February 1st, 1917, but the machines were not ready until May. The first daylight raid on London was carried out by 14 Gothas on June 13th, 1917. On July 7th, 22 Gothas raided London. Night raids began in August of 1917 and continued until May 1918 when they were abandoned because of the increasingly heavy losses. At peak employment, in April 1918, 36 G.Vs were in service.

Operational use of the G.IV demonstrated that the incorporation of the fuel tanks into the engine nacelles was a mistake. In a crash landing the tanks could rupture and spill fuel onto the hot engines. This posed a serious problem because landing accidents caused 75% of operational losses. Gothaer produced the G.V, which housed its fuel tanks in the center of the fuselage. The smaller engine nacelles were mounted on struts above the lower wing.
[Read more]

Gotha G.V.
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Gothaer Waggonfabrik AG
  • Designed by: Hans Burkhard
  • First flight: 1917
  • Introduced: August 1917
  • Produced: 1917 to 1918
  • Number Built: 36
  • Powerplant: 2× Mercedes D.IVa water cooled inline, 260 hp (191 kW) each
  • Length: 40 ft 8 in (12.42 m)
  • Height: 14 ft (4.5 m)
  • Wingspan: 77 ft 9 in (23.70 m)
  • Wing Area: 963.6 ft² (89.5 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 2,739 kg (6,039 lb)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 8,745 lb (3,967 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 87 mph (140 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 21,325 ft (6,500 m)
  • Range: 840 km (522 miles)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 or 3 × 7.92 mm (0.312 in) Parabellum MG14 machine guns
    • Bombs: 1,102 lb of bombs, 3 machine guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Gotha G.V, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gotha_G.V"
  2. Batchelor, John and. Lowe, Malcolm V.The Complete Encyclopedia of Flight 1848-1939
  3. Chant, Chris (2000). The World's Great Bombers: From 1914 to the Present Day. Wigston, Leicester: Silverdale
  4. Cooksley, Peter. German Bombers of World War I in Action No.1173 2000. Carrollton, Texas: Squadron/Signal Publication.
  5. Grosz, Peter M. (1966). The Gotha GI - GV. Leatherhead, Surrey: Profile Publications.

Zeppelin-Staaken R.VI

 Zeppelin-Staaken Type L s/n 1432 - 1917
Zeppelin-Staaken Type L s/n 1432 - 1917
Zeppelin-Staaken R.VI - 1917I
Zeppelin-Staaken R.VI - 1917

This aircraft was mainly used for night bombing raids on London. The plane had enclosed crew cabins and the engines could be worked on during flight.
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Zeppelin Staaken R.VI
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Gothaer Waggonfabrik AG
  • Designed by: Hans Burkhard
  • First flight: 1917
  • Introduced: August 1917
  • Produced: 1917 to 1918
  • Number Built: 36
  • Powerplant: 2× Mercedes D.IVa water cooled inline, 260 hp (191 kW) each
  • Length: 40 ft 8 in (12.42 m)
  • Height: 14 ft (4.5 m)
  • Wingspan: 77 ft 9 in (23.70 m)
  • Wing Area: 963.6 ft² (89.5 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 2,739 kg (6,039 lb)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 8,745 lb (3,967 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 87 mph (140 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 21,325 ft (6,500 m)
  • Range: 840 km (522 miles)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 or 3 × 7.92 mm (0.312 in) Parabellum MG14 machine guns
    • Bombs: 1,102 lb of bombs, 3 machine guns

References

  1. Zeppelin-Staaken R.VI. (2012, May 12). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 01:11, May 17, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Zeppelin-Staaken_R.VI&oldid=492276869
  2. Mark's Lists German Giants Retrieved 01:01, May 17, 2012, from http://www.markslists.net/history/germangiants/index.html
  3. The Aerodrome Forum Zeppelin Staaken R.vi/ Type L Seeflugzeug Bomber Camouflage Retrieved 01:01, May 17, 2012, from http://www.theaerodrome.com/forum/camouflage-markings/33768-zeppelin-staaken-r-vi-type-l-seeflugzeug-bomber-camouflage.html
  4. E. Offermann, W. G. Noack, and A. R. Weyl, "Riesenflugzeuge, in: Handbuch der Flugzeugkunde" (Richard Carl Schmidt & Co., 1927).
  5. Haddow, G.W. & Grosz, Peter M. "The German Giants, The Story of the R-planes 19141919". London. Putnam. (1962, 3rd ed. 1988).ISBN 0-85177-812-7
  6. Gray, Peter & Thetford, Owen. "German Aircraft of the First World War". London, Putnam. (2nd Ed.) 1970. ISBN 0-370-00103-6
  7. Wagner, Ray and Nowarra, Heinz, "German Combat Planes", Doubleday, 1971.

German Bombers 1918

Linke-Hofmann R.II

Linke-Hofmann R.II - 1918
Linke-Hofmann R.II - 1918

The Linke-Hofmann R.II (Riesenflugzeug - giant aircraft) was a heavy bomber aircraft designed by Paul Stumpf of Linke-Hofmann and built in Germany from 1917.

The Linke-Hofmann R.I had disappointing performance and handling, as well as structural weakness, both prototypes crashing. Linke-Hoffman took a radically different approach for their second Riese Flugzeug, the Linke-Hofmann R.II. Linke-Hofmann sought to realize the benefits of the internal placement of four engines in the design of a heavy aircraft which avoided the drag created by traditional nacelles and additional structural elements such as struts and braces.
[Read more]

Linke-Hofmann R.II
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Country: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Linke-Hofmann
  • Designed by: Paul Stumpf
  • Designed: 1917
  • First Flight: 1918
  • Number Built: 2
  • Powerplant: 4 × Mercedes D IVa, 260 hp (193.9 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 138 ft 4 in (42.16 m)
  • Wing Area: 3,443 ft² (320 m²)
  • Length: 66 ft 7.875 in (20.316 m)
  • Height: 23 ft 3.875 in (7.1 m)
  • Empty weight: 17,640 lb (8,000 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 26,460 lb (12,000 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 81.25 mph (130 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: 410.1 ft/min (2.08 m/s)
  • Crew: 6+
  • Armament: 3 ×x machine-guns in two dorsal and one ventral positions.

References

  1. From Wikipedia Linke-Hofmann R.II, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linke-Hofmann_R.II
  2. Haddow, G.W. & Grosz, Peter M. The German Giants, The Story of the R-planes 1914-1919, 1963. London. Putnam.
  3. Gray, Peter & Thetford, Owen. German Aircraft of the First World War. London, Putnam. ISBN 0 370 00103 6

Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII

Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII R23/16, 1918
Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII R23/16, 1918

The Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII was a bomber aircraft designed and built in Germany from 1916.

Armed with the experience gained in the development of the Steffen R series, Siemens-Schuckert felt confident in their ability to produce even larger bombers. Their next project was developing a new design that dwarfed anything they had previously built. Their plan was to produce a six engined Riesenflugzeug for the Military Air Service.As with many of the other contemporary R projects the R.VIII had all six engines inside the fuselage, where they were tended by mechanics, driving two tractor and two pusher propellers, mounted between the mainplanes, via leather cone clutches combining gearboxes, shafts and bevel gearboxes. Two aircraft were built but only the first, R23/16, was completed. Ground trials began in 1919, after the armistice. The trials were interrupted by a gearbox failure which resulted in a propeller breaking up and causing extensive damage to the aircraft.

The second airframe, R24/16 was never completed and the first not repaired after the ground running accident due to the Versaille Treaty restrictions. At the time of its completion the Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII was the largest complete aeroplane in the world, (the Mannesman-Poll triplane was to have been much bigger but was not completed before the Versaille Treaty restrictions were applied).

Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII
  • Role: Heavy Bomber
  • National origin: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Siemens-Schuckert Werke G.m.b.H., Siemensstadt. Berlin
  • Number built: 2 (one unfinished)
  • Wingspan: 48 m (157 ft 6 in)
  • Wing area: 440 m² (4,700 ft²)
  • Length: 21.6 m (70 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 7.4 m (24 ft 3 in)
  • Empty weight: 10,478 kg (23,100 lb)
  • Gross weight: 15,867 kg (34,980 lb)
  • Powerplant: 6 × Basse & Selve BuS.IVa 6-cyl. water-cooled in-line piston engines, 220 kW (300 hp) each
  • Propellers: tractor 900 rpm - 2 bladed , pusher 700 rpm - 4-bladed
  • Maximum speed: 125 km/h (78 mph; 67 kn) (estimated)
  • Range: 900 km (559 mi; 486 nmi) (estimated)
  • Service ceiling: 4,000 m (13,123 ft) (estimated)
  • Wing loading: 35 kg/m#179; (7.2 lb/sq ft)
  • Crew: 6+
  • Cost: 750,000 Marks

References

  1. Siemens-Schuckert R.VIII. (2012, May 12). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:23, May 21, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Siemens-Schuckert_R.VIII&oldid=492123582
  2. Haddow, G.W. & Grosz, Peter M. "The German Giants, The Story of the R-planes 1914-1919". London. Putnam. 1963.
  3. Gray, Peter & Thetford, Owen. "German Aircraft of the First World War". London, Putnam. ISBN 0-370-00103-6
  4. Sollinger, Guenther, "Villehad Forssman: Constructing German Bombers 1914-1918". Moscow, Rusavia, 2009.