France

Breguet Br.XIV

Breguet Br.14B2 - 1917
Breguet Br.14B2 - 1917

Used throughout the war, the innovative Breguet Br.14 was a highly successful biplane used by the French, Belgian and American air services. Designed by Louis Breguet in 1916, it was one of the first aircraft constructed with duralumin in the airframe.

Rugged and versatile, it was mass produced in several variations, including a seaplane model. Before the end of the war, the Br.14 saw service as a reconnaissance aircraft, a day/night bomber and an air ambulance. This was one of the best bombers the French used. It was produced up until 1926.

Breguet Br.14B2
  • Type: Bomber (B2) and Reconnaissance (A2)
  • Country: France
  • Entered Service: Summer of 1917
  • Number Built: About 5,500 during World War I
  • Powerplant: Renault 12 Fox, water cooled 12 cylinder, 300 hp
  • Wing Span: 47 ft 1.25 in (14.36 m)
  • Length: 29 ft (8.87 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 10 in (3.3 m)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,892 lb (1,765 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 110 mph (177 km/h) at 6,560 ft (2,000 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 19,030 ft (5,800 m)
  • Endurance: 2 ¾ hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2-3 machine guns
    • Bombs: 661 lb (300 kg) of bombs

Caudron G.4

Caudron G.IV
Caudron G.IV - 1915

The Caudron G.4 was a French biplane with twin engines, widely used during World War I as a bomber aircraft. It was designed by René and Gaston Caudron as an improvement over their Caudron G.3. The aircraft was no delight for the eye with its massive, open construction. The aircraft employed wing warping for banking. The first G.4 was manufactured in 1915, both in France, England and in Italy.

The Caudron G.4 was used as a reconnaissance bomber into the heart of Germany. Later, when Germany developed a fighter force, the aircraft had to be used for night bombings.
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Caudron G.4
  • Type: Reconnaissance/Bomber
  • Country: France
  • Manufacturer: Caudron
  • Designed by: Caudron Frères
  • Number Built: 1,421
  • Entered Service: 1915
  • Engine(s):
    • 2 × Le Rhône air cooled rotariy, 9 cylinder, 80 hp (60 kW)
    • 2 × Anzani air cooled radial, 10 cylinder, 100 hp
  • Wing Span: 56 ft 5 in (17.2 m)
  • Length: 23 ft 6 in (7.16 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 5 in (2.6 m)
  • Wing Area: 409 ft² (38.00 m²)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,932 lb (1,330 kg)
  • Speed: 82 mph (132 km/h) at 6,560 ft (2,000 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 14,110 ft (4,300 m)
  • Endurance: 3 ½ hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 machine gun
    • Bombs: 249 lb 113 kg of bombs

Caudron R.11

Caudron R 11 - 1917
Caudron R 11 - 1917

The Caudron R.11 was first used as a bomber and then used as an escort at the end of the war. This was the last bomber the French built during the war.

The R.11 was originally intended to fulfill the French Corps d'Armee reconnaissance category. Its design was similar to the Caudron R.4, but with a more pointed nose, two bracing bays outboard the engines rather than three, no nose-wheel, and a much larger tail. The engines were housed in streamlined nacelles just above the lower wing.

The French army ordered 1000 R.11s. Production began in 1917, with the first aircraft completed late in that year. In February 1918 the first Escadrille (squadron) R.26 was equipped. The last escadrille to form before the Armistice (and production ended abruptly) was R.246, at which point 370 planes had been completed.

Caudron R.11
  • Type: Fighter
  • Country: France
  • Manufacturer: Caudron
  • Designed by: Paul Deville
  • First flight: 1917
  • Number Built: 370
  • Powerplant: 2 × Hispano-Suiza 8Bba water cooled inline piston, 215 hp (160 kW) each each
  • Wingspan: 58 ft 9.5 in (17.92 m)
  • Length: 36 ft 11 in (8.5 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 2.25 in (2.8 m)
  • Wing Area: 5583.96 ft² (84.25 m²)
  • Empty weight: 3135 lb (1422 kg)
  • Loaded Weight 4777 lb (2167 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 114 mph (183 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Service Ceiling: 19520 ft (5950 m)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 5 machine guns
    • Bombs: 265 lb of bombs

Italy

Caproni Ca.36

Caproni Ca.3 - 1914
Caproni Ca.3 - 1914
Caproni Ca.3

The Caproni three-engined bomber appeared in 1914, powered by three Gnome rotary engines. The production version, equipped with three 100 hp fixed in-line Fiat A 10 engines entered service in the summer of 1915, and it was the most effective bomber of any air force, except for the Russian Sikorsky.Ilya Mourometz.

The Caproni Ca.3 was an Italian heavy bomber of World War I and the post-war era. It was the definitive version of the series of aircraft that began with the Caproni Ca.1 in 1914.
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Caproni Ca.36
  • Type: Bomber
  • Country: Italy
  • Manufacturer: Caproni
  • Entered service: summer of 1915
  • Engines: 3 × Isotta Fraschini water cooled V.4B 180 hp (134 kW)
  • Length: (11.05 m )
  • Height: (3.85 m)
  • Empty Weight: (2,650 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: (3,650 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: (37 km/h)
  • Wing Span: (22.74 m)
  • Service Ceiling: (4,100 m)
  • Endurance: 4 hr 45 min.
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament: 3-6 machineguns

Caproni Ca.4

Caproni Ca.4 - 1918
Caproni Ca.4 - 1918

Caproni Ca.4 Series was patterned along the lines of the Caproni Ca.3 series of biplane bombers, the larger triplanes of the Ca.4 series were designed to be more effective in combat. Sometimes armed with up to eight machine guns, these cumbersome bombers were capable of accurately delivering large payloads of bombs to distant enemy targets. Although mainly used at night, they took part in daylight raids towards the end of the war. Of thirty-two Ca.42s manufactured in 1918, six of them were used by the Royal Naval Air Service.
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Caproni Ca.42
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Country: Italy
  • Manufacturer: Caproni
  • First Introduced: 1918
  • Number Built: 32
  • Engines: 3 × Isotta-Fraschini, water cooled V-6, 270 hp
  • Wing Span: 98 ft 1 in (29.9 m)
  • Length: 42 ft 11.75 in (13.1 m)
  • Height: 20 ft 8 in (6.3 m)
  • Loaded Weight: 14,793 lb (6,710 kg)
  • Speed: 78 mph (126 kmh)
  • Service Ceiling: 9,842 ft (3000 m)
  • Endurance: 7 hours
  • Crew: 4
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 4 to 8 machine guns
    • Bombs: 3,197 lb (1,450 kg) of bombs

Russia

Sikorsky Ilya Mouromets V

Sikorsky Ilya  Mouromets V
Sikorsky Ilya Mouromets V

Sikorsky's Ilya Mourometz was the world's first four-engine bomber. Construction started in August, 1913 and first flight was in January, 1914. The cockpit had space for several persons. Openings on both sides of the fuselage permitted mechanics to climb out on the wings to service the engines during flight. A hatch on the left side provided an exit to the front bridge. Behind the cockpit was a large passenger cabin. In the rear was a stairway to the upper bridge and a washroom. Further back was a private cabin including a berth, small table and cabinet. During World War I over 75 ILia Mourometz were deployed in a special squadron at the front for bombing and reconnaissance missions.

The Ilya Muromets (Sikorsky S-22) was designed and constructed by Igor Sikorsky at the Russo-Baltic Carriage Factory (RBVZ) in Riga in 1913. It was based on his earlier S-21 Russky Vityaz or Le Grand which had played an important role in the development of Russian aviation and the multi-engine aircraft industries of the world.

Russia had a chance to become the birthplace of the first multi-passenger and multi-engine airliner. The Ilya Muromets was first conceived and built as a luxurious aircraft. For the first time in aviation history, it had an insulated passenger saloon, comfortable wicker chairs, a bedroom, a lounge and even the first airborne toilet. The aircraft also had heating and electrical lighting.

On 10 December 1913, the Ilya Muromets was tested in the air for the first time, and on 25 February 1914, took off for its first demonstration flight with 16 passengers aboard. From 21 to 23 June (one source gives 30 June - 12 July interval), it set a world record by making a trip from St Petersburg to Kiev, a distance of some 1200 km, and back. The first leg took 14 hours and 38 minutes with one landing for fuel - at Orsha, and the return one, with a fuel stop at Novosokolniki, took even less time, some 13 hours. If it had not been for World War I, the Ilya Muromets would probably have started passenger flights that same year.
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Sikorsky Ilya Muromets Type S-23 V
  • Role: Heavy Bomber
  • Country: Russia
  • Manufacturer: Russo-Baltic Wagon Company
  • Designed by: Igor Sikorsky
  • First Flight: 1913
  • Entered Service: 1913
  • Number Built: 80+
  • Length: 57 ft 5 in (17.5 m)
  • Wingspan:
    • Top Wing: 97 ft 9 in (29.8 m)
    • Bottom Wing: 68 ft 11 in (21 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 1 in (4 m)
  • Wing Area: 1,350 ft² (125 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 6,930 lb (3,150 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 12,000lb (4,600 kg)
  • Powerplant: 4 × Sunbeam Crusader V8 engines, 148 hp (110 kW) each
  • Fuel and Oil: 1,320 lb (600 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 110 km/h (68 mph)
  • Wing Loading: 7.5 lb/ft² (36.8 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 16.9 lb/hp (7.7 kg/hp)
  • Endurance: 5 hours with 660 lb (300 kg) of bombs & armament, 10 hours with extra fuel.
  • Crew: four to eight (up to twelve)
  • Armament:
    • Guns: Various numbers and combinations of guns at different points during the war, including 12.7 mm, 15.3 mm, 25 mm, 37 mm, and 76.2 mm guns, Maxim guns, Lewis guns, Madsen guns, Colt machine guns and Leonid Kurchevsky's experimental recoilless guns among them.
    • BombsVarious loads of 50 kg, 100 kg and 656 kg bombs or 6 x 127 mm rockets (under the wings) depending on fuel, armament and crew carried. With three crew and two defensive machine-guns, a V type Ilya Muromets could carry 1,100 lb (500 kg) of bombs.

United Kingdom

Airco D.H.4

Airco D.H.4 - 1917
Airco D.H.4 - 1917
Airco D.H.4

Designed in 1916 by Geoffrey de Havilland, the D.H.4 was the only British design manufactured by the Americans. It was easily identified by its rectangular fuselage and deep frontal radiator. Versatile, heavily armed and equipped with a powerful twelve cylinder engine, this biplane daylight bomber was fast.

Sometimes called the "Flaming Coffin," its huge fuel tank was dangerously positioned between the pilot and observer, hindering communication. Produced in vast numbers, 6295, of which 4846 were built in the United States, many D.H.4s were modified for civilian air service after the war.
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Airco D.H.4
  • Type: Tactical Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Aircraft Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
  • Entered Service: March 1917
  • Number Built: 6,295
  • Engine(s):
    • Rolls-Royce Eagle VII, water cooled 12 cylinder, 375 hp
    • Liberty 12, water cooled 12 cylinder, 395 to 421 hp (USA)
    • Wing Span: 42 ft 4.5 in 12.92 m
  • Length: 30 ft 8 in (9.35 m)
  • Height: 11 ft (3.35 m)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,472 lb (1,575 kg)
  • Speed: 143 mph {230 km/h) sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 23,500 ft (7,163 m)
  • Endurance: 6 hr 45 min
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2-4 machine guns
    • Bombs: 460 lb (208.7 kg) of bombs

Airco DH.9

Airco DH.9
Airco DH.9 - 1917

The Airco DH.9 (from de Havilland 9) - also known after 1920 as the de Havilland DH.9 - was a British bomber used in the First World War. A single-engined biplane, it was a development of Airco's earlier, highly successful DH.4 and was ordered in very large numbers for Britain's Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force.

Its engine was unreliable, and failed to provide the expected power, giving the DH.9 poorer performance than the aircraft it was meant to replace, and resulting in heavy losses, particularly over the Western Front. The subsequently-developed DH.9A had a more powerful and reliable American Liberty L-12 engine.

The DH.9 was designed by de Havilland for the Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 1916 as a successor to the DH.4. It used the wings and tail unit of the DH.4 but had a new fuselage. This enabled the pilot to sit closer to the gunner/observer and away from the engine and fuel tank. The other major change from the DH.4 was the choice of the promising new BHP/Galloway Adriatic engine, which was predicted to produce 300 hp (224 kW) and so give the new aircraft an adequate performance to match enemy fighters.
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Airco D.H.9
  • Type: Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Airco
  • Designed by: Geoffrey de Havilland
  • First flight: July 1917
  • Introduced: 1917
  • Retired: 1920
  • Primary users: Royal Air Force, RNAS, RFC.
  • Number Built: 4091
  • Variants: DH.9A, DH.9C, Westland Walrus
  • Length: 30 ft 5 in (9.27 m)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft 4½ in (19.92 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 3½ in (3.44 m)
  • Wing area: 434 ft² (40.3 m²)
  • Empty weight: 2,360 lb (1,014 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 3,790 lb (1,723 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Armstrong Siddeley Puma piston engine, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • Maximum speed: 98 kn (113 mph, 182 km/h)
  • Endurance: 4½ hours
  • Service ceiling: 15,500 ft (4,730 m)
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft 18 min 30 sec
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns:
    • 1 × Forward firing Vickers machine gun
    • 1 or 2 × Rear Lewis guns on scarff ring
    • Bombs: Up to 460 lb (209 kg) bombs

Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo

Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo
Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo

The Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo was a British twin-engine reconnaissance torpedo biplane built by Blackburn Aircraft of the First World War.

In 1916, the Blackburn Aircraft Company designed and built two prototypes of an anti-submarine floatplane designated the Blackburn G.P. or Blackburn General Purpose. It was not ordered but Blackburn developed a landplane version as the Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo (Reconnaissance Torpedo Type 1). The first aircraft was delivered to Martlesham Heath in January 1918. Test results were disappointing, with the rear fuselage being prone to twisting and the aircraft suffering control problems, which lead to the existing order for 50 aircraft being cut back to 20, most of which were already part built.
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Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo
  • Type: Reconnaissance Torpedo Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Blackburn Aeroplane & Motor Co Ltd
  • First Flight: 1918
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Retired: 1929
  • Number Built : 20
  • Engines: 2× Rolls-Royce Falcon II liquid-cooled V12 engine, 250 hp (120 kW) each
  • Length: 44 ft 2 in (13.46 m)
  • Wingspan: 74 ft 10 in (22.82 m)
  • Height: 16 ft 10 in (5.13 m)
  • Wing Area: 868 ft² (80.64 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 5,284 lb (2,397 kg)
  • Maximum Takeoff Weight: 8,017 lb (3,636 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 98 mph at 6,500 ft (1980 m) (158 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 13,000 ft (3,960 m)
  • Rate of Climb: (initial) 480 ft/min (2.44 m/s)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine gun
    • Bombs: Up to 920 lb (417 kg) of bombs

Handley Page HP.12 (O/400)

Handley Page
Handley Page HP.12 (O/400)

The Handley Page Type O was an early biplane bomber used by Britain during the First World War. At the time, it was the largest aircraft that had been built in the UK and one of the largest in the world. It was built in two major versions, the Handley Page O/100 (H.P.11) and Handley Page O/400 (H.P.12).

As early as December 1914 during the First World War the Royal Navy's Director of the Air Department, Captain Murray Sueter requested “a bloody paralyser” of an aircraft from Frederick Handley Page for long-range bombing. The phrase had originated from a Commander Samson who had returned from the front

Handley Page responded to the Navy's requirements with a biplane with a wingspan of 100 ft/30 m (the original source of the O/100 designation). The first prototype flew on 7 December 1915 and featured a glazed cockpit and armor sufficient to protect from rifle fire around the crew compartment and engines. The aircraft proved somewhat underpowered, so the glazing and armor were deleted on the second prototype that flew the following April and formed the basis for series production of the machine. A total of 46 of the O/100s were built.

Handley Page Type O
  • Type: Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Handley Page
  • First Flight: December 1915
  • Introduced: 1916
  • Number Built: 600
  • Wingspan: 100 ft (30.48 m)
  • Length: 62 ft 10¼ in (19.16 m)
  • Height: 22 ft (6.71 m)
  • Wing Area: 1,648 ft² (153.1 m²)
  • Empty weight: 8,502 lb (3,856 kg)
  • Maximum Takeoff Weight: 13,360 lb (6,060 kg)
  • Engines: 2× Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII water cooled in line piston, 360 hp (268 kW) each
  • Maximum Speed: 97 ½ mph (84.7 kn, 157 km/h)
  • Range: 608 nmi 700 mi, ( 1,120 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 8,500 ft (2,600 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 23 min to 5,000 ft
  • Endurance: 8 hours
  • Crew: 4 or 5
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 5 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns (2 on nose Scarff ring, 2 on dorsal position and 1 at ventral hatch)
    • Bombs: Up to 2,000 lb (907 kg) of bombs
  • Avionics: Drift Sight Mark IA, an early mechanical bombsight

Handley Page V/1500

Handley Page V/1500
Handley Page V/1500

The Handley Page V/1500 was a British night-flying heavy bomber built by Handley Page towards the end of the First World War. It was a large four-engined biplane, which resembled a larger version of Handley Page's earlier O/100 and O/400 bombers, intended to bomb Berlin from East Anglian airfields. The end of the war stopped the V/1500 being used against Germany, but a single aircraft was used to carry out the first flight from England to India, and later carried out a bombing raid on Kabul during the Third Anglo-Afghan War. It was colloquially known within the fledgling Royal Air Force as the “Super Handley”.

While the V/1500 had a similar fuselage to that of the O/100, it had longer-span, four-bay biplane wings and was powered by four 375 hp (280 kW) Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII engines mounted in two nacelles, so two engines were pulling in the conventional manner and two pushing, rather than the two Eagles of the smaller bomber. Construction was of wood and fabric materials. A relatively novel design feature was the gunner's position at the extreme rear of the fuselage, between the four fins.

Handley Page V/1500
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Handley Page
  • Designed by: George Rudolph Volkert
  • First Flight: 22 May 1918
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Number Built; 63
  • Length: 64 ft 0 in (19.51 m)
  • Wingspan: 126 ft 0 in (38.41 m)
  • Height: 23 ft 0 in (7.01 m)
  • Wing Area: 2,800 ft² (260 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 17,600 lb (8,000 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 30,000 lb (14,000 kg)
  • Engines: 4× Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII V-12 water cooled, 375 hp (280 kW) each
  • Maximum Speed: 99 mph (159 km/h) at sea level
  • Range: 1,300 mi (2,090 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 11,000 ft (3,350 m)
  • Endurance: 17 hours
  • Climb: to 10,000 ft (3,000 m): 41 min 25 sec
  • Crew: Eight or nine
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 3 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis guns each in nose, dorsal and tail positions
    • Bombs: Up to 7,500 lb (3,400 kg) of bombs (30 × 250 lb/113 kg carried internally)

Short Bomber

Short Bomber
Short Bomber

The Short Bomber was a British two-seat long-range reconnaissance, bombing and torpedo carrying aircraft designed by Short Brothers as a land-based development of the very successful Short Type 184 (of which more than 900 were built and many exported).

The Bomber was a three-bay biplane of wooden structure with fabric covering, originally developed from the Short 184 seaplane's fuselage combined with wings developed from those on the Short Admiralty Type 166 seaplane. The fuselage was of box section with curved upper decking mounted on the lower wing. The tailplane included a split elevator with a single fin and rudder. The undercarriage consisted of a four-wheeled assembly under the nose and a skid under the tail.
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Short Bomber
  • Type: Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Short Brothers
  • First Flight: 1915
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Retired: April 1917
  • Number Built: 83
  • Powerplant: 1times; Rolls-Royce Eagle liquid-cooled V12 engine, 250 hp (187 kW)
  • Wingspan: 84 ft 0 in (25.61 m)
  • Length: 45 ft 0 in (13.72 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 0 in (4.57 m)
  • Wing Area: 870 ft² (80.9 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 5,000 lb (2,273 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 6,800 lb (3,090 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 67 knots 77 mph, (124 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 10,600 ft (3,200 m)
  • Endurance: 6 hours
  • Climb: to 10,000 ft 93,050 m): 45 min
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament
    • Guns: 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine gun
    • Bombs: 8x 112 lb (51 kg) bombs

Vickers Vimy

 Vickers Vimy
Vickers Vimy

The Vickers Vimy was a British heavy bomber aircraft of the First World War and post-First World War era. By October 1918, only three aircraft had been delivered to the Royal Air Force, one of which had been deployed to France for use by the Independent Air Force. The war ended, however, before it could be used on operations.

Reginald Kirshaw "Rex" Pierson, chief designer of Vickers Limited Aviation Department designed a twin-engine biplane bomber, the Vickers F.B.27 to meet a requirement for a night bomber capable of attacking targets in Germany, a contract being placed for three prototypes on August 14, 1917. Design and production of the prototypes was extremely rapid, with the first flying on November 30, 1917, powered by two 200 hp (150 kW) Hispano Suiza engines. It was named after the Battle of Vimy Ridge.
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Vickers Vimy
  • Type: Heavy bomber
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed by: Reginald Kirshaw Pierson
  • First flight: 30 November 1917
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Retired: 1933
  • Primary User: Royal Air Force
  • Variants: Vickers Vernon
  • Powerplant: 2 × Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII piston engines, 360 hp (268 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 68 ft 1 in (20.75 m)
  • Wing Area: 1,330 ft² (123.56 m²)
  • Length: 43 ft 7 in (13.28 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 8 in (4.77 m)
  • Empty Weight: 7,104 lb (3,222 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 10,884 lb (4,937 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 100 mph (161 km/h)
  • Range: 900 mi (1,448 km)
  • Service ceiling: 7,000 ft (2,134 m)
  • Power/mass: 0.07 hp/lb (0.11 kW/kg)
  • Crew: 4
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun in Scarff ring in nose and 1 × in Scarff ring in mid-fuselage
    • Bombs: 2,476 lb (1,123 kg) of bombs