British Bombers 1915

Handley Page HP.12 (O/400)

Handley Page
Handley Page HP.12 (O/400)

The Handley Page Type O was an early biplane bomber used by Britain during the First World War. At the time, it was the largest aircraft that had been built in the UK and one of the largest in the world. It was built in two major versions, the Handley Page O/100 (H.P.11) and Handley Page O/400 (H.P.12).

As early as December 1914 during the First World War the Royal Navy's Director of the Air Department, Captain Murray Sueter requested “a bloody paralyser” of an aircraft from Frederick Handley Page for long-range bombing. The phrase had originated from a Commander Samson who had returned from the front

Handley Page responded to the Navy's requirements with a biplane with a wingspan of 100 ft/30 m (the original source of the O/100 designation). The first prototype flew on 7 December 1915 and featured a glazed cockpit and armor sufficient to protect from rifle fire around the crew compartment and engines. The aircraft proved somewhat underpowered, so the glazing and armor were deleted on the second prototype that flew the following April and formed the basis for series production of the machine. A total of 46 of the O/100s were built.

Handley Page Type O
  • Type: Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Handley Page
  • First Flight: December 1915
  • Introduced: 1916
  • Number Built: 600
  • Wingspan: 100 ft (30.48 m)
  • Length: 62 ft 10¼ in (19.16 m)
  • Height: 22 ft (6.71 m)
  • Wing Area: 1,648 ft² (153.1 m²)
  • Empty weight: 8,502 lb (3,856 kg)
  • Maximum Takeoff Weight: 13,360 lb (6,060 kg)
  • Engines: 2× Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII water cooled in line piston, 360 hp (268 kW) each
  • Maximum Speed: 97 ½ mph (84.7 kn, 157 km/h)
  • Range: 608 nmi 700 mi, ( 1,120 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 8,500 ft (2,600 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 23 min to 5,000 ft
  • Endurance: 8 hours
  • Crew: 4 or 5
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 5 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Guns (2 on nose Scarff ring, 2 on dorsal position and 1 at ventral hatch)
    • Bombs: Up to 2,000 lb (907 kg) of bombs
  • Avionics: Drift Sight Mark IA, an early mechanical bombsight

References

  1. From Wikipedia Handley Page Type O, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handley_Page_Type_O"
  2. "The Birth of the Big Aeroplane: Sir Fredrick Handley Page Looks Back". Flight (9 November 1961): p.722.
  3. Bruce, J. M.. "Handley Page 0/100 and 0/400: Historic Military Aircraft No.4". Flight (27 February 1953): pp. 254-259. Retrieved 2009-05-10.
  4. Bowyer, Chaz (1992). Handley Page Bombers. Bourne End, Bucks: Aston Publications. ISBN 0-946627-68-1.
  5. Barnes, Charles Henry (1987). Handley Page Aircraft Since 1907. London: Putnam & Company, Ltd.. ISBN 0-85177-803-8.
  6. Jackson, A. J. (1974). British Civil Aircraft since 1919 Volume 2. Putnam & Company. ISBN 370-10010-7.
  7. Jackson, Robert (2006). The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft. Bath: Parragon Books Ltd.. ISBN 1-40542-465-6.
  8. Mason, Francis K. (1994). The British Bomber since 1914. London: Putnam Aeronautical Books. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.
  9. Thetford, Owen (1991). British Naval Aircraft Since 1912. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1557500762.
  10. Walls, John (1977). Clayton & Shuttleworth and Marshall Aircraft Production. Lincoln: Control Column.

Short Bomber

Short Bomber - 1915
Short Bomber - 1915

The Short Bomber was a British two-seat long-range reconnaissance, bombing and torpedo carrying aircraft designed by Short Brothers as a land-based development of the very successful Short Type 184 (of which more than 900 were built and many exported).

The Bomber was a three-bay biplane of wooden structure with fabric covering, originally developed from the Short 184 seaplane's fuselage combined with wings developed from those on the Short Admiralty Type 166 seaplane. The fuselage was of box section with curved upper decking mounted on the lower wing. The tailplane included a split elevator with a single fin and rudder. The undercarriage consisted of a four-wheeled assembly under the nose and a skid under the tail.
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Short Bomber
  • Type: Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Short Brothers
  • First Flight: 1915
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Retired: April 1917
  • Number Built: 83
  • Powerplant: 1times; Rolls-Royce Eagle liquid-cooled V12 engine, 250 hp (187 kW)
  • Wingspan: 84 ft 0 in (25.61 m)
  • Length: 45 ft 0 in (13.72 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 0 in (4.57 m)
  • Wing Area: 870 ft² (80.9 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 5,000 lb (2,273 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 6,800 lb (3,090 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 67 knots 77 mph, (124 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 10,600 ft (3,200 m)
  • Endurance: 6 hours
  • Climb: to 10,000 ft 93,050 m): 45 min
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament
    • Guns: 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine gun
    • Bombs: 8x 112 lb (51 kg) bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Short Bomber, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short_Bomber"
  2. Barnes, C.H.; James D.N. (1989). Shorts Aircraft since 1900. London: Putnam. ISBN 0-85177-819-4.
  3. Mason, Francis K. (1994). The British Bomber since 1914. London: Putnam Aeronautical Books. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.
  4. Thetford, Owen (1978). British Naval Aircraft since 1912 (Fourth ed.). London: Putnam. ISBN 0 370 30021 1.

British Bombers 1916

Airco DH.3

Airco D.H.3 - 1916
Airco D.H.3 - 1916

The Airco DH.3 was a British bomber aircraft of the First World War. The DH.3 was designed by Geoffrey de Havilland, Chief Designer at the Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 1916 as a long range day bomber. It was a large biplane with wide-span three-bay wings, slender fuselage, and a curved rudder. It was powered by two 120 hp (89 kW) Beardmore engines mounted as pushers between the wings. In addition to tail skid landing gear, two wheels were placed beneath the nose to prevent bumping.

A second prototype, designated D.H.3A was built with more powerful (160 hp/119 kW) Beardmore engines, and a production order for 50 placed by the War Office. This order was cancelled however before any could be completed, because Strategic bombing was not thought to be worthwhile and twin engined bombers were claimed to be impracticable. The two prototypes were scrapped in 1917.

The DH.10 was a development of the DH.3 which first flew in March 1918 but was too late to see squadron service during the war.

Airco DH.3
  • Role: Biplane bomber
  • Manufacturer: Airco
  • Designed by: Geoffrey de Havilland
  • Introduced: 1916
  • Retired: 1917
  • Status: Prototype only
  • Number built: 2
  • Powerplant: 2 × Beardmore 120 hp inline piston engine, 120 hp (89 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 60 ft 10 in (18.54 m)
  • Wing area: 793 ft² (73.67 m²)
  • Length: 36 ft 10 in (11.23 m)
  • Height: 14 ft 6 in (4.42 m)
  • Empty weight: 3,980 lb (1,805 kg)
  • Gross weight: 5,810 lb (2,635 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 95 mph (153 km/h)
  • Range: 700 miles (1,130 km)
  • Endurance: 8 hours
  • Rate of climb: 550 ft/min (2.8 m/s)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 × flexibly mounted .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis guns
    • Bombs: up to 680 lb (308 kg) bombs

References

  1. Airco DH.3. (2011, January 22). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:29, February 13, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Airco_DH.3&oldid=409267462
  2. Donald, David, ed. The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft. Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada: Prospero Books, 1997, p. 118. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.
  3. Jackson, A.J. De Havilland Aircraft since 1909. London:Putnam, Third edition, 1987. ISBN 0 85177 802 X.
  4. Mason, Francis K. The British Bomber since 1914. London:Putnam, 1994. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.

British Bombers 1917

Airco D.H.4

Airco D.H.4 - 1917
Airco D.H.4 - 1917

Designed in 1916 by Geoffrey de Havilland, the D.H.4 was the only British design manufactured by the Americans. It was easily identified by its rectangular fuselage and deep frontal radiator. Versatile, heavily armed and equipped with a powerful twelve cylinder engine, this biplane daylight bomber was fast.

Sometimes called the "Flaming Coffin," its huge fuel tank was dangerously positioned between the pilot and observer, hindering communication. Produced in vast numbers, 6295, of which 4846 were built in the United States, many D.H.4s were modified for civilian air service after the war.
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Airco D.H.4
  • Type: Tactical Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Aircraft Manufacturing Co. Ltd.
  • Entered Service: March 1917
  • Number Built: 6,295
  • Engine(s):
    • Rolls-Royce Eagle VII, water cooled 12 cylinder, 375 hp
    • Liberty 12, water cooled 12 cylinder, 395 to 421 hp (USA)
    • Wing Span: 42 ft 4.5 in 12.92 m
  • Length: 30 ft 8 in (9.35 m)
  • Height: 11 ft (3.35 m)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,472 lb (1,575 kg)
  • Speed: 143 mph {230 km/h) sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 23,500 ft (7,163 m)
  • Endurance: 6 hr 45 min
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2-4 machine guns
    • Bombs: 460 lb (208.7 kg) of bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Airco DH.4, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airco_DH.4"
  2. Angelucci, Enzo, (editor). World Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft. London: Jane's, 1991. ISBN 0-7106-0148-4.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The De Havilland D.H.4." Flight, 17 October 1952, pp. 506-510.
  4. Bowers, Peter M. Boeing Aircraft since 1916. London: Putnam, Second edition, 1989. ISBN 0-85177-804-6.
  5. Jackson, A.J. British Civil Aircraft since 1919: Volume 2. London:Putnam, Second edition, 1973. ISBN 0-370-10010-7.
  6. Jackson, A.J. De Havilland Aircraft since 1909. London: Putnam, Third edition, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-802-X.
  7. Mason, Francis K. The British Bomber since 1914. London: Putnam Aeronautical Books, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.
  8. Maurer, Maurer (editor). The U.S. Air Service in World War I: Volume IV Postwar Review. Washington, DC: The Office of Air Force History Headquarters USAF, 1979.
  9. Sturtivant, Ray and Gordon Page. The D.H.4/D.H.9 File. Tunbridge Wells, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd., 2000. ISBN 0-85130-274-2.
  10. Swanborough, F.G. and Peter M. Bowers. United States Military Aircraft since 1909. London: Putnam, 1963.
  11. Swanborough Gordon and Peter M. Bowers. United States Naval Aircraft since 1911. London: Putnam, Second edition, 1976. ISBN 0-370-10054-9.
  12. Thetford, Owen. British Naval Aircraft since 1912. London: Putnam, Fourth edition, 1978. ISBN 0-370-30021-1.
  13. United States Air Force Museum. Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio: Air Force Museum Foundation, 1975.
  14. Williams, George K. Biplanes and Bombsights: British Bombing in World War I. Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Air University Press, 1999. ISBN 1-41020-012-4.

Airco DH.9

Airco D.H.9 - 1917
Airco D.H.9 - 1917

The Airco DH.9 (from de Havilland 9) - also known after 1920 as the de Havilland DH.9 - was a British bomber used in the First World War. A single-engined biplane, it was a development of Airco's earlier, highly successful DH.4 and was ordered in very large numbers for Britain's Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force.

Its engine was unreliable, and failed to provide the expected power, giving the DH.9 poorer performance than the aircraft it was meant to replace, and resulting in heavy losses, particularly over the Western Front. The subsequently-developed DH.9A had a more powerful and reliable American Liberty L-12 engine.

The DH.9 was designed by de Havilland for the Aircraft Manufacturing Company in 1916 as a successor to the DH.4. It used the wings and tail unit of the DH.4 but had a new fuselage. This enabled the pilot to sit closer to the gunner/observer and away from the engine and fuel tank. The other major change from the DH.4 was the choice of the promising new BHP/Galloway Adriatic engine, which was predicted to produce 300 hp (224 kW) and so give the new aircraft an adequate performance to match enemy fighters.
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Airco D.H.9
  • Type:Tactical Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Airco
  • Designed by: Geoffrey de Havilland
  • First flight: July 1917
  • Introduced: 1917
  • Retired: 1920
  • Primary users: Royal Air Force, RNAS, RFC.
  • Number Built: 4091
  • Variants: DH.9A, DH.9C, Westland Walrus
  • Length: 30 ft 5 in (9.27 m)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft 4½ in (19.92 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 3½ in (3.44 m)
  • Wing area: 434 ft² (40.3 m²)
  • Empty weight: 2,360 lb (1,014 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 3,790 lb (1,723 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Armstrong Siddeley Puma piston engine, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • Maximum speed: 98 kn (113 mph, 182 km/h)
  • Endurance: 4½ hours
  • Service ceiling: 15,500 ft (4,730 m)
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft 18 min 30 sec
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns:
    • 1 × Forward firing Vickers machine gun
    • 1 or 2 × Rear Lewis guns on scarff ring
    • Bombs: Up to 460 lb (209 kg) bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Airco DH.9, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airco_DH.9"
  2. Barnes, C.H. Handley Page Aircraft since 1907. London:Putnam, 1976. ISBN 0 370 00030 7.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The De Havilland D.H.9 Historic Military Aircraft No. 12, Part I". Flight, 6 April 1956. Pages 385-388, 392.
  4. Bruce, J.M. "The De Havilland D.H.9 Historic Military Aircraft No. 12, Part II". Flight, 13 April 1956. Pages 422-426.
  5. Gerdessen, F. "Estonian Air Power 1918 - 1945". Air Enthusiast No 18, April - July 1982. Pages 61-76. ISSN 0143-5450.
  6. Jackson, A.J. British Civil Aircraft since 1919 Volume 2. London:Putnam, Second edition 1973. ISBN 0 370 10010 7.
  7. Jackson, A.J. De Havilland Aircraft since 1909. London Putnam, Third edition 1987. ISBN 0 85177 802 X.
  8. Mason, Francis K. The British Bomber Since 1914. London Putnam Aeronautical Books, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.
  9. Winchester, Jim, ed. Bombers of the 20th Century. London Airlife Publishing Ltd., 2003. ISBN 1-84037-386-5.

Avro 529

Avro 529 - 1917
Avro 529 - 1917

The Avro 529 was a twin-engined biplane long-range bomber of the First World War. Two prototypes were built but no production ensued.

The Avro 529 was Avro's second twin-engined aircraft and their second attempt at a heavy bomber. Their first in both categories was the Pike, developed in early 1916 to Royal Flying Corps (RFC) guidelines for a short-range bomber. The Pike arrived too late to secure orders from the RFC who would order the Handley-Page O/100 and for the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) who had ordered the Short Bomber. Nonetheless, after trials of the Pike, the Admiralty ordered two prototypes of an enlarged Pike for a long range bomber role. This was the Type 529.

Like the Pike, it was a large twin-engined biplane of the then-standard wood and canvas construction. It had three-bay wings without sweepback, dihedral or stagger, partly to facilitate wing folding. The vertical tail was different to that of the Pike: it had a small, roughly triangular fin and a rudder with a round balance surface above the fin, a reminder of Avro's "comma" rudder form.
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Avro 529A
  • Role: Long range bomber
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: A.V. Roe & Co.
  • First flight: April 1917
  • Number built: 2
  • Developed from: Avro Pike
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 2 × B.H.P. (Galloway built), 230 hp (170 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 64 ft 1 in (19.53 m)
  • Wing area: 910 ft² (84.54 m²)
  • Length: 39 ft 8 in (12.09 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 0 in (3.96 m)
  • Empty weight: 4,361 lb (1,978 kg)
  • Gross weight: 7,135 lb (3,236 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 116 mph (187 km/h)
  • Endurance: 5.25 hours
  • Service ceiling: 17,500 ft (5,335 m)
  • Rate of climb: to 5,000 ft (1525 m) 715 ft/min (3.6 m/s)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • 20 × 50 lb (23 kg) bombs
    • 1 × trainable 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun on Scarff ring in nose
    • 1 × trainable 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun on Scarff ring in dorsal position

References

  1. Avro 529. (2011, January 21). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 06:09, January 28, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_529&oldid=409163298
  2. Jackson, A.J. "Avro Aircraft since 1908". 1965, pp. 92-94. London: Putnam Publishing.

British Bombers 1918

Airco DH.10

Airco D.H.10 Amiens - 1918
Airco D.H.10 Amiens - 1918

The Airco DH.10 Amiens was a British twin-engined medium bomber designed and built towards the end of the First World War. It served briefly with the RAF postwar.

The DH.10 was designed by Geoffrey de Havilland to meet the requirements of Air Board Specification A.2.b for a single- or twin-engined day bomber. It was a development of the earlier Airco DH.3 bomber, which had flown in 1916, but had been rejected by the War Office because of a belief that strategic bombing would be ineffective and that twin engines were impracticable.

The first prototype flew on 4 March 1918, powered by two 230 hp (186 kW) Siddeley Puma engines mounted as pushers. When evaluated by the RAF, the performance of this prototype was well below expectation, reaching only 90 mph (145 km/h) at 15,000 ft (4,572 m) with the required bomb load. Owing to this poor performance, the DH.10 was redesigned with more powerful engines in a tractor installation.

The second prototype, known as the Amiens Mark II was powered by two 360 hp (268 kW) Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII engines and first flew in April 1918, showing greatly superior performance and proving to be faster than the DH.9A while carrying twice the bomb load. While shortages of the Eagle meant that the Amiens Mark II could not be put into production, it proved the design for the definitive aircraft, the Amiens Mark III, which was powered by the more readily available 395 hp (295 kW) Liberty 12 from America, as was the DH.9A. Following successful evaluation, large orders were placed, with a total of 1,291 ordered.
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DH.10 Amiens IIIA
  • Role: Medium Bomber
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Airco
  • Designed by: Geoffrey de Havilland
  • First flight: 4 March 1918
  • Introduced: November 1918
  • Retired: 1923
  • Primary user: Royal Air Force
  • Number built: 258
  • Powerplant: 2 × Liberty 12A V-12 piston, 400 hp (298 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 65 ft 6 in (19.97 m)
  • Wing area: 837 ft² (77.8 m²)
  • Length: 39 ft 7.33 in (12.08 m)
  • Height: 14 ft 6 in (4.42 m)
  • Empty weight: 5,750 lb (2,614 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 8,500 lb (3,863 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 9,060 lb (4,118 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 114 kn (131 mph, 211 km/h) at sea level
  • Service ceiling: 19,000 ft (5,800 m)
  • Wing loading: 10.2 lb/ft² (49.7 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.094 hp/lb (0.15 kW/kg)
  • Climb to 10,000 ft: 11 min
  • Endurance: 6 hours
  • Crew: Three
  • Armament:
  • Guns: 1 or 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis guns on Scarff rings at both nose and midships gunners cockpits
  • Bombs: Up to 920 lb (417 kg) bombs carried internally

References

  1. Airco DH.10. (2011, February 5). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 20:58, February 12, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Airco_DH.10&oldid=412210736
  2. Airco DH.10. Virtual Aircraft Museum http://www.luftfahrtmuseum.com/htmi/itf/dh10a.htm
  3. British Aircraft Directory http://www.britishaircraft.co.uk/aircraftpage.php?ID=669
  4. Jackson, A. J. British Civil Aircraft Since 1919, Volume 2. London: Putnam, Second Edition, 1973. ISBN 0 370 10010 7.
  5. Jackson A. J. De Havilland Aircraft since 1909. London:Putnam, 1987. ISBN 0 85177 802 X.
  6. Mason, Francis K. The British Bomber since 1914. London: Putnam Aeronautical Books, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.
  7. Thetford, Owen. Aircraft of the Royal Air Force 1918-57, 1st edition. London: Putnam, 1957.

Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo

Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo
Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo

The Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo was a British twin-engine reconnaissance torpedo biplane built the First World War by Blackburn Aircraft.

In 1916, the Blackburn Aircraft Company designed and built two prototypes of an anti-submarine floatplane designated the Blackburn G.P. or Blackburn General Purpose. It was not ordered but Blackburn developed a landplane version as the Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo (Reconnaissance Torpedo Type 1).

The first aircraft was delivered to Martlesham Heath in January 1918. Test results were disappointing, with the rear fuselage being prone to twisting and the aircraft suffering control problems, which lead to the existing order for 50 aircraft being cut back to 20, most of which were already part built.

From the sixth aircraft onwards, they were powered by the more powerful Rolls-Royce Falcon III engine replacing the 250 hp (120 kW) Rolls-Royce Falcon II.
[Read more]

Blackburn R.T.1 Kangaroo
  • Type: Reconnaissance Torpedo Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Blackburn Aeroplane & Motor Co Ltd
  • First Flight: 1918
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Retired: 1929
  • Number Built : 20
  • Engines: 2× Rolls-Royce Falcon II liquid-cooled V12 engine, 250 hp (120 kW) each
  • Length: 44 ft 2 in (13.46 m)
  • Wingspan: 74 ft 10 in (22.82 m)
  • Height: 16 ft 10 in (5.13 m)
  • Wing Area: 868 ft² (80.64 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 5,284 lb (2,397 kg)
  • Maximum Takeoff Weight: 8,017 lb (3,636 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 98 mph at 6,500 ft (1980 m) (158 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 13,000 ft (3,960 m)
  • Rate of Climb: (initial) 480 ft/min (2.44 m/s)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine gun
    • Bombs: Up to 920 lb (417 kg) of bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Blackburn Kangaroo, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackburn_Kangaroo"
  2. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.
  3. Jackson, A.J. (1968). Blackburn Aircraft since 1909. London: Putnam. ISBN 0 370 00053 6.
  4. Jackson, A.J. (1974). British Civil Aircraft since 1919. London: Putnam. ISBN 0 370 10014 X.
  5. Jackson, A.J. (August 1979). "Blackburn's Marsupial". Aeroplane Monthly (London: IPC) 7 (8): pp. 396-402.

Bristol Braemar

Bristol Braemar Mk.II - 1918
Bristol Braemar Mk.II - 1918

The Bristol Braemar was a British heavy bomber aircraft developed at the end of the First World War for the Royal Air Force. Only two prototypes were constructed.

The prototype Braemar was developed in response to the establishment of the Independent Air Force in October 1917, as a bomber capable of the long-range bombing of Berlin if necessary. A large triplane, it had internal stowage for up to six 250 lb (110 kg) bombs.

The initial design featured a unique engine installation with a central engine room housing all four engines. The engines were to be geared in pairs and power taken from the engines to the four propellers by power shafts. This design was abandoned early in development, and both the completed Braemars had a conventional engine installation, with the engines in inline tandem pairs, driving pusher and tractor propellers. However, the engine-room design was resurrected later in the Braemar's development life, for the proposed steam-powered Tramp.
[Read more]

Braemar Mk.II
  • Role: Heavy bomber
  • National Origin: Great Britian
  • Manufacturer: Bristol Aeroplane Company
  • Designed by: Frank Barnwell
  • First flight: August 13, 1918
  • Number built: 2
  • Developed into: Bristol Pullman
  • Powerplant: 4 × Liberty L-12 inline engine, 400 hp (300 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 81 ft 8 in (24.89 m)
  • Wing area: 1,905 ft² (177 m²)
  • Length: 51 ft 6 in (15.73 m)
  • Height: 20 ft (6.10 m)
  • Empty weight: 10,650 lb (4,840 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 18,000 lb (8,170 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 109 kn (125 mph, 200 km/h) at sea level
  • Range: more than 1,000 mi ()
  • Service ceiling: 17,000 ft (5,100 m)
  • Wing loading: 9.45 lb/ft² (46.2 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.08 hp/lb (150 W/kg)
  • Crew: 6 - two pilots, wireless operator, engineer and two gunners
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis machine guns
    • Bombs: up to six 250 lb (110 kg) bombs total: 1,500 lb (680 kg)

References

  1. Bristol Braemar. (2010, November 10). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 06:38, March 8, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bristol_Braemar&oldid=395872431
  2. Barnes C.H. (1964). Bristol Aircraft Since 1910. Putnam & Company Ltd. ISBN 0-370-00015-3

Handley Page V/1500

Handley Page V/1500
Handley Page V/1500

The Handley Page V/1500 was a British night-flying heavy bomber built by Handley Page towards the end of the First World War. It was a large four-engined biplane, which resembled a larger version of Handley Page's earlier O/100 and O/400 bombers, intended to bomb Berlin from East Anglian airfields. The end of the war stopped the V/1500 being used against Germany, but a single aircraft was used to carry out the first flight from England to India, and later carried out a bombing raid on Kabul during the Third Anglo-Afghan War. It was colloquially known within the fledgling Royal Air Force as the “Super Handley”.

While the V/1500 had a similar fuselage to that of the O/100, it had longer-span, four-bay biplane wings and was powered by four 375 hp (280 kW) Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII engines mounted in two nacelles, so two engines were pulling in the conventional manner and two pushing, rather than the two Eagles of the smaller bomber. Construction was of wood and fabric materials. A relatively novel design feature was the gunner's position at the extreme rear of the fuselage, between the four fins.

Handley Page V/1500
  • Type: Heavy Bomber
  • Country: Great Britain
  • Manufacturer: Handley Page
  • Designed by: George Rudolph Volkert
  • First Flight: 22 May 1918
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Number Built; 63
  • Length: 64 ft 0 in (19.51 m)
  • Wingspan: 126 ft 0 in (38.41 m)
  • Height: 23 ft 0 in (7.01 m)
  • Wing Area: 2,800 ft² (260 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 17,600 lb (8,000 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 30,000 lb (14,000 kg)
  • Engines: 4× Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII V-12 water cooled, 375 hp (280 kW) each
  • Maximum Speed: 99 mph (159 km/h) at sea level
  • Range: 1,300 mi (2,090 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 11,000 ft (3,350 m)
  • Endurance: 17 hours
  • Climb: to 10,000 ft (3,000 m): 41 min 25 sec
  • Crew: Eight or nine
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 3 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis guns each in nose, dorsal and tail positions
    • Bombs: Up to 7,500 lb (3,400 kg) of bombs (30 × 250 lb/113 kg carried internally)

References

  1. From Wikipedia Handley Page V/1500, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handley_Page_V/1500"
  2. Barnes, C. H. Handley Page Aircraft Since 1907. London: Putnam & Company, Ltd., 1987. ISBN 0-85177-803-8.
  3. Bowyer, Chaz. Handley Page Bombers of the First World War. Bourne End, Bucks, UK:Aston Publications, 1992. ISBN 0-946627-68-1.
  4. Clayton, Donald C. Handley Page, an Aircraft Album. Shepperton, Surrey, UK: Ian Allan Ltd., 1969. ISBN 0-7110-0094-8.
  5. Mason, Francis K. The British Bomber since 1914. London:Putnam, 1994. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.

Vickers Vimy

 Vickers Vimy
Vickers Vimy

The Vickers Vimy was a British heavy bomber aircraft of the First World War and post-First World War era. By October 1918, only three aircraft had been delivered to the Royal Air Force, one of which had been deployed to France for use by the Independent Air Force. The war ended, however, before it could be used on operations.

Reginald Kirshaw "Rex" Pierson, chief designer of Vickers Limited Aviation Department designed a twin-engine biplane bomber, the Vickers F.B.27 to meet a requirement for a night bomber capable of attacking targets in Germany, a contract being placed for three prototypes on August 14, 1917. Design and production of the prototypes was extremely rapid, with the first flying on November 30, 1917, powered by two 200 hp (150 kW) Hispano Suiza engines. It was named after the Battle of Vimy Ridge.
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Vickers Vimy
  • Type: Heavy bomber
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Limited
  • Designed by: Reginald Kirshaw Pierson
  • First flight: 30 November 1917
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Retired: 1933
  • Primary User: Royal Air Force
  • Variants: Vickers Vernon
  • Powerplant: 2 × Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII piston engines, 360 hp (268 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 68 ft 1 in (20.75 m)
  • Wing Area: 1,330 ft² (123.56 m²)
  • Length: 43 ft 7 in (13.28 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 8 in (4.77 m)
  • Empty Weight: 7,104 lb (3,222 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 10,884 lb (4,937 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 100 mph (161 km/h)
  • Range: 900 mi (1,448 km)
  • Service ceiling: 7,000 ft (2,134 m)
  • Power/mass: 0.07 hp/lb (0.11 kW/kg)
  • Crew: 4
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun in Scarff ring in nose and 1 × in Scarff ring in mid-fuselage
    • Bombs: 2,476 lb (1,123 kg) of bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia, Vickers Vimy, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_Vimy"
  2. Andrews, C.F. and Eric B. Morgan. Vickers Aircraft since 1908, Second edition. London: Putnam, 1988. ISBN 0-85177-815-1.
  3. Jackson, A.J. British Civil Aircraft 1919-1972: Volume III. London: Putnam, revised second edition, 1988. ISBN 0-85177-818-6.
  4. Jarrett, Philip. "By Day and By Night: Part Six." Aeroplane Monthly Volume 20, No. 11, November 1992. London: IPC. pp. 8-14.
  5. Mason, Francis K. The British Bomber Since 1914. London: Putnam Aeronautical Books, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.
  6. McMillan, Peter. "The Vimy Flies Again" National Geographic Volume 187, No. 5, May 1995. Washington. pp. 4-43.
  7. Thetford, Owen. "By Day and By Night: Part Seven." Aeroplane Monthly Volume 20, No. 12, December 1992. London: IPC. pp. 30-38.
  8. Winchester, Jim, ed. "Vickers Vimy." Biplanes, Triplanes and Seaplanes (Aviation Factfile). London: Grange Books plc, 2004. ISBN 1-84013-641-3.