Port Victoria P.V.2

Port Victoria PV.2 - 1916
Port Victoria P.V.2

The Port Victoria P.V.2 was a British prototype floatplane fighter of the First World War, designed and built at the Royal Naval Air Service's Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot on the Isle of Grain. Only a single aircraft was built, with the type not being chosen for production.

The Port Victoria Depot's second design, designated Port Victoria P.V.2 was a floatplane fighter intended to intercept German Zeppelins. The P.V.2 was a small single engined biplane, powered by a Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine driving a four blage propellor. It was of wood and fabric construction, and of sesquiplane configuration, i.e. with its lower wing much smaller than its upper wing (both of which used the high-lift wing sections pioneered by the P.V.1). Unusually, the aircraft's wing bracing struts also carried the aircraft's floats, forming a "W" shape when viewed from the front. The upper wing was attached directly to the top of the fuselage, giving a good field of fire for the intended armament of a single 2-lb Davis gun recoiless gun.
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Port Victoria P.V.2
  • Role: Floatplane Fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot
  • First Flight: 16 June 1916
  • Status: Prototype only
  • Number Bbuilt: 1
  • Powerplant: 1× Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 0 in (8.84 m)
  • Wing Area: 180 ft² (16.7 m²)
  • Length: 22 ft 0 in (6.71 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 4 in (2.85 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,211 lb (550 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,702 lb (774 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 81 knots (93 mph, 150 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Climb to 3,000 ft (915 m): 6 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis guns above upper wing.

References

  1. "Port Victoria P.V.2". (2010, September 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 23:34, November 8, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Port_Victoria_P.V.2&oldid=385055205
  2. "Port Victoria P.V.2 1916" Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 23:33, November 8, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/portvictoria_pv-2.php
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Tabloid,Schneider and Baby: Historic Military Aircraft No.17 Part IV". Flight, 29 November 1957. pp. 845848.
  4. Collyer, David. "Babies Kittens and Griffons". Air Enthusiast, Number 43, 1991. Stamford, UK:Key Publishing. ISSN 0143 5450. pp. 5055.
  5. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Port Victoria PV.5

Port Victoria PV.5 - 1917
Port Victoria PV.5

Shortly after the Depot initiated work on the P.V.4, it was asked to develop a single-seat fighter seaplane also capable of performing light bombing tasks with two internally-stowed 30kg bombs. To meet this requirement, two different aircraft were designed and built, the P.V.5 and the P.V.5a. The former was developed from the P.V.2bis and employed a similar sesquiplane wing cellule devoid of flying wires and braced by struts to the float undercarriage. The wings employed a high-lift aerofoil section, the armament comprised a single synchronised 7.7mm machine gun plus the two 30kg bombs specified and power was provided by a 150hp Hispano- Suiza engine. Fitted with pontoon-type floats rather than the Linton Hope floats for which it had been designed, the P.V.5 was flight tested in mid-1917 with promising results, but the original requirement had been overtaken and development was discontinued.

Port Victoria PV.5
  • Type: Single seat floatplane
  • National Origin: Britian
  • First Flight: 1917
  • Manufacturer: RNAS Marine Experimental Depot, Port Victoria
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Hispano- Suiza engine 150hp
  • Wingspan: 32 ft 0 in (9.75 m)
  • Wing Area: 244.99 ft² (22.76 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 6 in (7.77 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 9 in (2.97 m)
  • Take-off Weight: 2456 lb (1114 kg)
  • Empty Weight: 1788 lb (811 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 94 mph (151 km/h)
  • Crew: one
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers gun
    • Bombs: 2 × internally-stowed 30kg bombs

References

  1. "Port Victoria P.V.5 1917" Virtual Aircraft Museum Retreived from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/portvictoria_pv-5.php
  2. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  3. Green, William and Gordon Swanborough. "The Complete Book of Fighters". London: Salamander Books, 1994. ISBN 0-83173-939-8.
  4. Bruce, J.M. British "Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957.

Port Victoria P.V.7

Port Victoria PV.7 - Grain Kitten - 1917
Port Victoria PV.7 - Grain Kitten - 1917

The Port Victoria P.V.7 Grain Kitten was a prototype British Fighter aircraft of the First World War designed and built by the Port Victoria Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot on the Isle of Grain. A very small and light biplane intended to fly off platforms on Royal Navy Destroyers, it was unsuccessful, only a single prototype being built.

Following Royal Navy experience in operating land planes from platforms on ships, in late 1916, the British Admiralty came up with the idea of a lightweight fighter aircraft, capable of flying off short platforms on the forecastle of Destroyers in order to provide large numbers of aircraft at sea capable of intercepting and destroying German Airships. It therefore instructed the Marine Aircraft Experimental Department at Port Victoria on the Isle of Grain, and the RNAS Experimental Flight at Eastchurch to each produce a design to meet this requirement.
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P.V.7/ Grain Kitten
  • Role: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: RNAS Marine Experimental Depot, Port Victoria
  • Designed by: W H Sayers
  • First flight: 22 June 1917
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1× ABC Gnat two-cylinder horizontally-opposed air-cooled, 35 hp (26 kW)
  • Wingspan: 18 ft 0 in (5.49 m)
  • Wing area: 85 ft² (7.9 m²)
  • Length: 14 ft 11 in (4.55 m)
  • Height: 5 ft 3 in (1.60 m)
  • Empty weight: 284 lb (129 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 491 lb (223 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 74 knots (85 mph, 137 km/h) at 6,500 ft (1,980 m)
  • Service ceiling: 11,900 ft (3,630 m)
  • Wing loading: 5.77 lb/ft² (28.2 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 0.071 hp/lb (0.12 kW/kg)
  • Climb to: 6,500 ft (1,980 m) 10 min 50 s
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × .303 in Lewis gun above upper wing.

References

  1. "Port Victoria PV7 Grain Kitten - airship interceptor" Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 01:03, November 9, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/portvictoria_pv-7.php
  2. "Port Victoria PV7 Grain Kitten (1917) (England)" The-Blueprints.com, Retrieved 12:03, October 19, 2010, from http://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww1planes/ww1-english/36145/view/port_victoria_p_v_7_grain_kitten_%281917%29_%28england%29/
  3. "Port Victoria P.V.7". (2010, September 18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 00:35, November 10, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Port_Victoria_P.V.7&oldid=385587956
  4. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume One Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1965.
  5. Collyer, David. "Babies Kittens and Griffons". Air Enthusiast, Number 43, 1991. Stamford, UK:Key Publishing. ISSN 0143 5450. pp. 50–55.
  6. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Port Victoria P.V.9

Port Victoria PV.9 - 1917
Port Victoria PV.9

The Port Victoria P.V.9 was a British single-seat biplane floatplane fighter of the First World War. Although claimed to be the best aircraft of its type yet to be tested, only a single prototype was built.

In mid-1917, the RNAS Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot at Port Victoria on the Isle of Grain was instructed to build a new single-seat floatplane fighter as a possible replacement for the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS)'s Sopwith Babys. The new aircraft was to combine the good manoeuvrability and pilot view of Port Victoria's earlier P.V.2 floatplane with superior speed.

Like the P.V.2, the new design, the Port Victoria P.V.9 was a single-engined sesquiplane (i.e. a biplane with its lower wing much smaller than its upper wing) braced with faired steel tubes. The fuselage, wider than that of the P.V.2, was mounted between the upper and lower wings, almost filling the inter-wing gap, giving an excellent view for the pilot. Armament was a Vickers machine gun synchronised to fire through the propeller disc, with a Lewis gun mounted above the upper wing firing over the propeller. Power was provided by a Bentley BR1 rotary engine. While the designers had hoped to use the same high-lift aerofoil section as used in the P.V.2, this was rejected by the Admiralty, who demanded the use of the more conventional RAF 15 aerofoil, which resulted in a larger aircraft with a reduced climb rate and ceiling.
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Port Victoria P.V.9
  • Role: Floatplane fighter
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: RNAS Marine Experimental Aircraft Depot
  • First flight: December 1917
  • Number built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Bentley BR1 9-cylinder air-cooled rotary engine, 150 hp (110 kW)
  • Upper wingspan: 30 ft 11 in (9.42 m)
  • Lower wingspan: 20 ft 1 in (6.12 m)
  • Wing area: 227 ft² (21.1 m²)
  • Airfoil: RAF 15
  • Length: 25 ft 2 in (7.67 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 0 in (2.74 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,404 lb (637 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,965 lb (891 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 34.5 Imp Gallons
  • Maximum speed: 110.5 mph (177.8 km/h; 96.0 kn) at 2,000 ft (610 m)
  • Service ceiling: 11,500 ft (3,505 m)
  • Time to altitude: 3 min 10 s to 2,000 ft (610 m), 27 min 20 s to 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Endurance: 2.5 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7mm) synchronised Vickers machine gun and 1× 0.303 in (7.7mm) Lewis gun above upper wing

References

  1. "Port Victoria P.V.9". (2010, September 18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 00:02, November 9, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Port_Victoria_P.V.9&oldid=385587893
  2. "Port Victoria P.V.9 1917" Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 00:03, November 9, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/portvictoria_pv-9.php
  3. "Port Victoria PV.9" (in Russian) http://www.airwar.ru/enc/fww1/pv9.html
  4. Bruce, J.M. British "Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957.
  5. Collyer, David. "Babies Kittens and Griffons". Air Enthusiast, Number 43, 1991. Stamford, UK:Key Publishing. ISSN 0143 5450. pp. 50-55.
  6. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.