The German aircraft industry responded to the need for reconnaissance aircraft by producing two seat unarmed aircraft designated as B-Type.

Albatros B.I

Albatros B.I - 1914
Albatros B.I

The Albatros B.I was a German military reconnaissance aircraft designed in 1913 and which saw service during World War I.

It was a two-seat biplane of conventional configuration which seated the observer and pilot in separate cockpits in tandem. The wings were originally of three-bay design, later changed to two-bay, unstaggered configuration. A floatplane version was developed as the W.I.

B.Is were withdrawn from front line service in 1915 but examples served as trainers for the remainder of the War.

Albatros B.I
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Albatros Flugzeugwerke
  • Primary User: Germany
  • First Flight: 1914
  • Entered Service: 1914
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.I, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 46 ft 11 in (14.30 m)
  • Wing area: 463 ft² (43 m²)
  • Length: 28 ft 1 in (8.55 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 6 in (3.5 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,300 lb (600 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 1,800 lb (800 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 60 mph 100 km/h()
  • Range: 400 mi (650 km)
  • Rate of climb: 200 ft/min (1 m/s)
  • Crew: two, pilot and observer
  • Armament: None

References

  1. Albatros B.I. (2010, May 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 22:15, August 29, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Albatros_B.I&oldid=360031337
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions. pp. 51.

Albatros B.II

Albatros B.II - 1914
Albatros B.II

The Albatros B.II was an unarmed German two-seat reconnaissance biplane of the First World War.

Designed by Ernst Heinkel based on his 1913 Albatros B.I, the B.II was the aircraft that brought the aircraft manufacturer Albatros Flugzeugwerke to the world's attention.
[Read more]

Albatros B.II
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Albatros Flugzeugwerke
  • First Flight: 1914
  • Entered Service: 1914
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.II 6-cylinder liquid-cooled inline engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft 0 in (12.80 m)
  • Wing area: 463 ft² (43 m²)
  • Length: 25 ft 0 in (7.63 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 4 in (3.15 m)
  • Loaded weight: 2,361 lb (1,071 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 57 kn, 66 mph (105 km/h)
  • Service ceiling: 9,840 ft (3,000 m)
  • Crew: two, pilot and observer
  • Armament: None

References

  1. From Wikipedia Albatros B.II "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albatros_B.II"
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions.

Aviatik B.I

Aviatik B.II - 1915
Aviatik B.I

The Aviatik B.I was a relatiely slow, unarmed, two-seater biplane, it entered into service in 1914, and was used for observation and reconnaissance in the early years of the war.

Aviatik B.I
  • Manufacturer: Automobil und Aviatikwerke AG
  • Type: Reconnaissance
  • Entered Service: 1914
  • Powerplant:1 × Mercedes, 6 cylinder, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wing Span: 45 ft 10 in (13.97 m)
  • Length: 26 ft 2 in (7.97 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 10 in (3.30 m)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,400 lb (1,088 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 62 mph (100 km/h)
  • Endurance: 4 hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: None

References

  1. From Wikipedia Aviatik B.I, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aviatik_B.I"
  2. Gunston, Bill (1993). "World Encyclopedia of Aircraft Manufacturers". Annapolis: Naval Institute Press.
  3. Jackson, Robert (2002). "The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft". Paragon.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation." London: Studio Editions.

LVG B.I

LVG B.II- 1914
LVG B.I

LVG had been involved in the operation of dirigibles before it started design, in 1912, of the company's first original design, the B.I. The B.I was an unequal-span two-seat biplane with a fixed tail-skid landing gear. It was powered by a nose-mounted 80 kW (100 hp) Mercedes D.I engine.
[Read more]

LVG B.I
  • Role: Two-seat reconnaissance biplane
  • National origin: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft
  • Primary user: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.I inline piston engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 39 ft 9.25in (12.12 m)
  • Wing Area: 381.05 ft² (35.40 m²)
  • Height: 9 ft 8.25 in (2.95 m)
  • Length: 27 ft 2.75 in (8.30 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,600 lb (726 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,370 lb (1,075 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 65 mph (105 km/h)
  • Endurance: 4 hours 0 min
  • Crew: 2 (pilot, observer)
  • Armament: None

References

  1. From Wikipedia LVG B.I, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LVG_B.I"
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation>". London: Studio Editions.
  3. "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft" (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.

Rumpler B.I

Rumpler B.I
Rumpler B.I

The Rumpler B.I (factory designation 4A) was a military reconnaissance aircraft produced in Germany during World War I. It was a conventional two-bay biplane with unstaggered wings of unequal span. It featured two open cockpits in tandem and fixed, tailskid undercarriage. Its upper wing reflected the wing design of the Etrich Taube that Rumpler was building at the time.

Rumpler built 198 of these aircraft for the Luftstreitkräfte, plus 26 seaplane versions for the Imperial German Navy.

Rumpler B.I
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Rumpler
  • First Flight: 1914
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Number Built: ca 225
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.I, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft 8 in (13.00 m)
  • Length: 27 ft 7 in (8.40 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 2 in (3.10 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,650 lb (750 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 2,100 lb (970 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 90 mph 145 km/h()
  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer

References

  1. Gray, Peter; Owen Thetford (1962). "German Aircraft of the First World War". London: Putnam.
  2. "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft". London: Aerospace Publishing.
  3. Kroschel, Günter; Helmut Stützer (1994). "Die Deutschen Militärflugzeuge 1910-1918". Herford: Verlag E.S. Mittler & Sohn.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions.