Caudron Aircraft 1914

Caudron G.III

Caudron G.III - 1914
Caudron G.III - 1914

The French Caudron G.III was a two seat, single-engined tractor biplane, with a twin-boom tail. The end of the lower booms was used as a landing skid. It was initially built in May of 1913. Its wing spars were of ash and spruce with reinforcing strips of metal. The wings had no dihedral. The design used wing warping, rather than ailerons, for controlling movement of the aircraft. Initially, the horizontal stabilizer also used warping, but later a hinged stabilizer was added. The aircraft was used as an Army cooperation and reconnaissance machine.

Caudron G.III
  • Type: Reconnaissance
  • Manufacturer: Caudron
  • Designed by: René and Gaston Caudron
  • Entered Service: 1914
  • Powerplant: Anzani 10 cylinder air cooled radial, 90 hp (67 kW)
  • Wing Span: 13.40 m
  • Length: 6.40 m
  • Height: 2.5 m
  • Wing Area: 290 ft² (27.00 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 420 kg
  • Loaded Weight: 710 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 112 mph
  • Service Ceiling: 14,110 ft (4,300 m)
  • Endurance: 4 hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: none

References

  1. From Wikipedia Caudron G.3, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caudron_G.III"
  2. Donald, David (Editor) (1997). "The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft". Aerospace Publishing, p.233. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.
  3. Holmes, Tony (2005). "Jane's Vintage Aircraft Recognition Guide". London: Harper Collins, p 26. ISBN 0 0071 9292 4.
  4. Kalevi Keskinen, Kyösti Partonen, Kari Stenman: "Suomen Ilmavoimat I 1918-27", 2005. ISBN 952-99432-2-9.
  5. Kalevi Keskinen, Kari Stenman, Klaus Niska: "Suomen ilmavoimien lentokoneet 1918-1939", Tietoteos, 1976.

Caudron Aircraft 1915

Caudron G.4

Caudron G.4 - 1915
Caudron G.4 - 1915

The Caudron G.4 was a French biplane with twin engines, widely used during World War I as a bomber aircraft. It was designed by René and Gaston Caudron as an improvement over their Caudron G.3. The aircraft was no delight for the eye with its massive, open construction. The aircraft employed wing warping for banking. The first G.4 was manufactured in 1915, both in France, England and in Italy.

The Caudron G.4 was used as a reconnaissance bomber into the heart of Germany. Later, when Germany developed a fighter force, the aircraft had to be used for night bombings.
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Caudron G.4
  • Type: Reconnaissance/Bomber
  • Country: France
  • Manufacturer: Caudron
  • Designed by: Caudron Frères
  • Number Built: 1,421
  • Entered Service: 1915
  • Engine(s):
    • 2 × Le Rhône air cooled rotariy, 9 cylinder, 80 hp (60 kW)
    • 2 × Anzani air cooled radial, 10 cylinder, 100 hp
  • Wing Span: 56 ft 5 in (17.2 m)
  • Length: 23 ft 6 in (7.16 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 5 in (2.6 m)
  • Wing Area: 409 ft² (38.00 m²)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,932 lb (1,330 kg)
  • Speed: 82 mph (132 km/h) at 6,560 ft (2,000 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 14,110 ft (4,300 m)
  • Endurance: 3 ½ hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 machine gun
    • Bombs: 249 lb 113 kg of bombs

References

  1. Caudron G.4. (2010, December 30). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 20:43, January 26, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Caudron_G.4&oldid=405065472
  2. Donald, David (Editor). The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft. Leicester, UK: Blitz Editions, 1997. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.
  3. Kalevi Keskinen, Kyösti Partonen, Kari Stenman: Suomen Ilmavoimat I 1918-27, 2005. ISBN 952-99432-2-9.
  4. Kalevi Keskinen, Kari Stenman, Klaus Niska: Suomen ilmavoimien lentokoneet 1918-1939', Tietoteos, 1976.
  5. Thetford, Owen. British Naval Aircraft since 1912. London:Putnam, 1978. ISBN 0 370 30021 1.

Caudron Aircraft 1916

Caudron G.6

Caudron G.6 - 1916
Caudron G.6 - 1916

The first prototype flew in July 1916. A total of 512 aircraft were built.

The only feature distinguishing the Caudron G.6 from the G.4 was the former's conventional fuselage, which replaced the latter's apparently inadequate twin lattice booms for supporting the tailplane.

The Caudron G.6 was a French reconnaissance aircraft of World War I. It married the wings and engine layout of the unorthodox Caudron G.4 to an all-new fuselage of conventional design. Over 500 of these aircraft were used by the French military for reconnaissance and artillery-spotting duties in 1917 and 1918.

Caudron G.6
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Country of Origin: France
  • Manufacturer: Caudron
  • Designed By: Paul Deville
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Primary User: Aviation Militaire
  • Number Built: 512
  • Powerplant: 2 × Le Rhône 9, 130 hp (97 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 56 ft 6 in (17.22 m)
  • Length: 28 ft 3 in (8.60 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 8 in (2.95 m)
  • Empty Weight: 2,072 lb (940 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 3,164 lb (1,435 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 196 mph (50 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 15,500 ft (4,725 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 866 ft/min (4.4 m/s)
  • Range: 224 miles (360 km)
  • Endurance: 2 hours 30 min
  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer
  • Armament:
  • Guns: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7mm) Lewis machine guns in flexible mount for observer
  • Bombs: up to 100 kg (220 lb) of bombs carried externally

References

  1. Caudron G.6. (2009, March 17). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 14:45, August 8, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Caudron_G.6&oldid=277927029
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. pp. 240.
  3. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 891 Sheet 17.

Caudron Aircraft 1917

Caudron R 11

Caudron R 11 - 1917
Caudron R 11 - 1917

The Caudron R.11 was first used as a bomber and then used as an escort at the end of the war. This was the last bomber the French built during the war.

The R.11 was originally intended to fulfill the French Corps d'Armee reconnaissance category. Its design was similar to the Caudron R.4, but with a more pointed nose, two bracing bays outboard the engines rather than three, no nose-wheel, and a much larger tail. The engines were housed in streamlined nacelles just above the lower wing.

The French army ordered 1000 R.11s. Production began in 1917, with the first aircraft completed late in that year. In February 1918 the first Escadrille (squadron) R.26 was equipped. The last escadrille to form before the Armistice (and production ended abruptly) was R.246, at which point 370 planes had been completed.

Caudron R 11
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Caudron
  • Designed by: Paul Deville
  • First flight: 1917
  • Number Built: 370
  • Wingspan: 58 ft 9.5 in (17.92 m)
  • Length: 36 ft 11 in (8.5 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 2.25 in (2.8 m)
  • Wing Area: 5583.96 ft² (84.25 m²)
  • Empty weight: 3135 lb (1422 kg)
  • Loaded Weight 4777 lb (2167 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Hispano-Suiza 8Bba water cooled inline piston, 215 hp (160 kW) each each
  • Maximum speed: 114 mph (183 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Service Ceiling: 19520 ft (5950 m)
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 5 machine guns
    • Bombs: 265 lb of bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Caudron R.11, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caudron_R.11"
  2. Donald, David, ed (1997). "The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft". Prospero Books. pp. pg 235. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.
  3. Green, W; Swanborough, G (1994). "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York: Smithmark. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.